Chrysalis: The 21st Thacher Art + Architecture Annual

May 1-August 9, 2020

A sheltered state or stage of growth, a chrysalis may be a physical space or set of circumstances that allow for an individual to transform. Featuring 67 artworks by 53 junior and senior majors and minors from the University of San Francisco’s Department of Art + Architecture, Chrysalis is a representation of the artistry in vulnerability and struggle.

As viewers, we are often only privy to the end result of the artistic process. The 21st Thacher Art + Architecture Annual celebrates the labor associated with creating a piece of art, and the growth and transformation that can happen along the way. Reoccurring themes include the environment, identity, experimentation, consumerism, art history, and the city of San Francisco.

Chrysalis is presented by USF’s Thacher Gallery and Art History/Museum Studies Thacher Practicum Class led by Nell Herbert. This year’s jurors include artist Jonathan Anzalone; artist, curator and educator Kevin Chen; Matea Fish, Senior Director at Gallery Wendi Norris; and artist and curator Rio Yañez.

View the Chrysalis exhibition online now

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Awards

Congratulations to this year's Thacher Annual award recipients! 

Gloria Osuna Pérez Award : Aerin Cassano
Honorable Mentions: Yesenia Canales and Elizabeth Moore

Mary and Carter Thacher Prize: Lily Applegate and Rose Gluck
Honorable Mentions: Jen Brooks, Melissa Chang, Mikaela Nagy

Thacher Practicum Student Choice Award: Alyssa Little
Honorable Mention: Collette Golden

Artists

Student Curators

Next Up in Thacher Gallery

artwork incorporating mugshots and images of weapons

For the 2020-21 season, the Thacher Gallery will explore systems, from the natural to the human made, beginning with a collaboration with Prison Renaissance that poses the question, “What does liberation mean to you?” Curated by Antwan Williams the exhibition will feature original artwork and writing created by artists who are currently incarcerated or who have survived the US prison system.