Shannon Siegel

Associate Professor

Department Chair • Full-Time Faculty

Harney Science Center 126B

Biography

Shannon Siegel, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of San Francisco. She teaches courses in the areas of growth, maturation, motor development and measurement. Professor Siegel’s research interests are in the area of cross-cultural components of physical activity, particularly in youth. She also researches methods to get and keep youth physically active; much of her current research involves teaching inactive and/or overweight youth to rock climb. Dr Siegel is an active member of both ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) and NASPEM (North American Society for Pediatric Exercise Medicine). In addition, she is a section editor for the International Journal of Exercise Science.

Appointments
Co-Chair, Kinesiology Department
Education
Michigan State University, PhD, 1999
The University of Texas, Austin, MA, 1995
UC Santa Cruz, BA, 1989
Experience
Co-chair, Kinesiology Department
President-elect, North American Society for Pediatric Exercise Medicine
Fellow, American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
Chair, ACSM Youth Sports and Exercise Science Special Interest Group
Section Editor, Physiology, International Journal of Exercise Science
Expertise
Kinesiology
Growth, maturation, and motor development
Research
Cross-cultural components of physical activity in youth
Health disparities in youth
Youth Sports
Selected Publications

Siegel SR, True L, Pfeiffer KA, Wilson JD, Martin EM, Branta CF, Pacewicz CE & Battista RA (2021). Recalled age at menarche: A follow-up to the Michigan State University Motor Performance Study. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 25:1, 78-86, 

True L, Martin EM, Pfeiffer KA, Siegel SR, Branta CF, Haubenstricker J, Seefeldt V (2020). Tracking of physical fitness components from childhood to adolescence: A longitudinal study. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 25:1, 22-34, 

Siegel SR and Fryer SM (2015). Rock climbing for promoting physical activity in youth. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine.