All that you touch: art and ecology

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Nicole Dixon, The Axe Forgets But The Tree Re-members, acrylic, charcoal, wood, fabric, chalk pastel, and gold leaf on canvas, 36” x 36”, 2021

Sept. 7–Nov. 7, 2021

Byron Au Yong, Nicole Dixon, Katie Dorame, Alicia Escott, Felicitas Fischer, Barnali Ghosh, Conni McKenzie, Jaime Serra dos Santos, Linda Yamane, and Minoosh Zomorodinia

All that you touch: art and ecology presents artists whose creative practices are informed by their personal encounters with the natural world.

Using whiteroot sedge and willow, Linda Yamane’s traditional Ohlone baskets reveal the inextricable link between culture and place. Katie Dorame’s collage prints indigenize iconographic Los Angeles landscapes with layered images of abalone and acorns. The meditations of California wildflowers in Alicia Escott’s installations and Barnali Ghosh’s South Asian fabric and dance-infused mirrored portraits further explore the tensions between native and invasive, organic and human-made. Nicole Dixon’s mixed-media paintings use natural elements, such as wood and gold, to reflect the cultural and spiritual qualities of her figures in order to lift up Black wisdom, while Minoosh Zomorodinia’s paintings use gold leaf to map her walks through urban landscapes. The compositional sketches by Byron Au Yong and the dance film co-created by Felicitas Fischer, Conni McKenzie, and Jaime Serra dos Santos serve as lamentations for nature devastated by climate change and geopolitical factors.

Working across the disciplines, these artists ask what can nature teach us about adaptation, regeneration, and healing? What can nature teach us about ourselves?

The exhibition will include a series of online conversations with the artists, tours, and additional events.

  • Byron Au Yong
    Forest Requiem Sketch
    Including:

    Sheet Music
    2021

    Sculpture Scores
    2021
    Found paper: rice cooker manual, yellow pad, Bloomberg Businessweek, Money Magazine, Chinese church pamphlet, calendar page, envelope

    Hugging Trees
    2020
    Digital photograph

    Burnt Circle
    2020
    Digital photograph

    Forest Requiem Sketch
    2021
    Digital video, 2 minutes 29 seconds


    Nicole Dixon
    The Snake And The Raffia Tree
    2018
    Acrylic, charcoal, watercolor, and gold leaf on canvas

    Nicole Dixon
    The Secret of Joy
    2021
    Acrylic, charcoal, wood, watercolor, fabric, and gold leaf on canvas

    Nicole Dixon
    The Axe Forgets But The Tree Re-members
    2021
    Acrylic, charcoal, wood, fabric, watercolor, pen, chalk pastel, and gold leaf on canvas

    Nicole Dixon
    Stardust Permutation
    2021
    Acrylic, charcoal, wood, fabric, watercolor, and gold leaf on canvas

    Nicole Dixon
    When You Climb a Good Tree, You Are Given a Push
    2021
    Acrylic, charcoal, watercolor, and gold leaf on canvas


    Katie Dorame
    Grinding Acorns Over You
    2019
    Inkjet print: digitized collage
    (Commissioned by SF MOMA’s Open Space)

    Katie Dorame
    Abalone, the Rock & Standing
    2019
    Inkjet print: digitized collage
    (Commissioned by SF MOMA’s Open Space)

    Katie Dorame
    Catalina Arrowhead
    2020
    Inkjet print: digitized collage and watercolor painting

    Katie Dorame
    Deep Dive
    2020
    Inkjet print: digitized collage and watercolor painting

    Katie Dorame
    Abalone Over LA
    2020
    Inkjet print: digitized collage and watercolor painting

    Katie Dorame
    LA Overseer
    2020
    Inkjet print: digitized collage and watercolor painting

    Katie Dorame
    Hovering Basket
    2020
    Inkjet print: digitized collage and watercolor painting

    Katie Dorame
    Freefall
    2020
    Inkjet print: digitized collage and watercolor painting

    Katie Dorame
    Abalone in the Pool
    2020
    Inkjet print: digitized collage and watercolor painting

    Katie Dorame
    Fishing
    2020
    Inkjet print: digitized collage and watercolor painting


    Alicia Escott
    Disarticulated Production
    2021
    Handmade drawings on found industrial plastic shrink wrap used for construction and renovation of buildings melted to rejoin, burnt Apple phone charge, burnt pvc pipe found at the sight of a Sonoma wildfire, ibuds, Live Oak acorns, burnt electronics, used ipods, video, redwood and live oak branches

    Alicia Escott
    The Archive to Come: a letter to covid19 in a seed
    2020-2021
    Digital video, 3 minutes 58 seconds
    Wildflower seeds, local compost, found plastic packaging for rugs
    (Part of Metabolic Rifts and Domestic Interiors, a series of ongoing collaborations with local native wildflower seeds.)


    Felicitas Fischer, Conni McKenzie, and Jaime Serra dos Santos
    Lungs of the Earth
    2021
    Dance film, 8 minutes 22 seconds (loop)


    Barnali Ghosh
    Bleeding Heart...it's a Feeling
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    June 11: I saw them unexpectedly at Tilden Regional Park Botanic Garden. The native bleeding heart, Dicentra formosa, is more subtle than their more known counterpart, Dicentra spectabilis. The way they hang makes me feel as if they are at peace with the world, as if they feel safe. A feeling that we all long for. This sari was a gift to my mom-in-law from her father, and I love its retro style. The paisley motifs look to me like bleeding hearts multiplied.

    Barnali Ghosh
    Delicate Pink Delight
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    June 9: I've been waiting for the roses to bloom up here and keeping my eyes peeled for a native rose. I had no luck on the streets I walk on, but thanks to friends I finally found them at the Tilden Regional Park Botanic Garden. The photo captures my delight at seeing this blushing messy delicate beauty. The mudra/hand gesture is used to show flowers blooming.

    Barnali Ghosh
    This fairy has secrets
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    June 24: This mudra is called Samputa, and is found in both Odissi and Bharatanatyam dance. It indicates both treasures held carefully, and the holding of secrets. This re-creation would have gone more smoothly if they made clothes with plant prints, like they do with animal prints. How come this isn’t a thing?!
    (Photograph of the fairy slipper orchid in Butano State Park, San Mateo is by Amy Patten.)

    Barnali Ghosh
    Happy Poppy
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    April 15: Celebrating getting my first vaccine dose yesterday by embodying the beloved California poppy, our state flower.

    Barnali Ghosh
    For the love of the colors of lupin!
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    April 20: There’s a little patch of wildflowers in a parking lot near my home with poppies and lupin. I went out and took some photos this morning, and for the first time noticed the pink. My lupin is a little less shy about showing off its colors.

    Barnali Ghosh
    Wild Iris
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    April 21: I’ve been in a purple phase! And could not move on without re-creating Iris douglasiana, purple with a touch of gold. The saree is a cotton from South India, and the black and white patterned fabric is a raw silk with kantha embroidery from Bengal.

    Barnali Ghosh
    Making Eyes at Baby Blue Eyes.
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    April 22: These were found a few blocks from home while walking with friends. We marveled at the pretty blue petals and the pure white centers. I thought I might do an "earthier" color but our planet is mostly water, and water is life, so blue feels appropriate. Happy Earth Day!

    Barnali Ghosh
    Paean to the California Peony / Every Day is Earth Day
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    April 23: I was immediately drawn to the rich deep color of the California peony. The pose is inspired by the bhumi pranam that we do in Odissi dance right before we start a dance performance or practice, asking forgiveness from the Earth for stomping on it. I’m not a religious person, but I still find this ritual grounding, thoughtful, and love the intention of it. It’s a lesson I could use every day.
    (Peony photograph: Teddy Llovet • CC-BY 2.0 • flic.kr/p/4x56a9)

    Barnali Ghosh
    What’s for Brunch?
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    April 24: The Matilija poppy/Fried egg flower reminds me most of a dancer. This photo was taken on the nightly walks I took during the early days of the pandemic. I love the specks of gold/pollen on the petals, and have tried to evoke that here with the fabric choices. And sometimes dancers sit. This pose is inspired by Odissi, and also Kathak, another South Asian dance form.

    Barnali Ghosh
    Rare Beauty
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    May 14: I'm thrilled that I got to use one of my most favorite shawls for the re-creation of this striking flower, and wearing it will now always remind me of it. (Photograph of the endangered Springville clarkia (endemic to Kern & Tulare counties) is by Amy Patten.)

    Barnali Ghosh
    Drumming fairies
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    May 19: The white globe lily presents a still look, but I think these fairy lanterns dance and drum when we are not looking. The sari is the first one I ever bought for myself, back when I thought I liked subtle colors. It will always be special, but the color is not something I reach for often. The dancing drummer pose is inspired by Odissi dance.
    (Photograph of the white globe lily was taken in the Ventana Wilderness by Amy Patten.)

    Barnali Ghosh
    Fuzzy beauty
    2021
    Digital photograph and journal entry
    July 17: Who knew flowers could be so hairy!
    This flower is found only on one mountaintop in Marin.
    (Photograph of the Tiburon Mariposa Lily is by Amy Patten.)


    Linda Yamane
    Tiprin Tuupen (Basketry Ear Ornaments)
    2017
    Basket Disks: Three-rod willow foundation, whiteroot sedge weaving strands, and redwing blackbird/acorn woodpecker/ meadowlark feathers
    Neck: Brain-tanned deer hide, mallard duck scalp, dogbane hemp cordage Bone Tubes: Incised bird bone rubbed with pulverized wood charcoal from Soberanes fire in Carmel Valley, and filled with willow sticks
    Ornamentation: Abalone disk beads, abalone pendants, clam disk beads, olivella disk beads, glass trade beads

    Linda Yamane
    Ohlone Honoring Basket
    2012
    Three-rod willow foundation, whiteroot sedge weaving strands, olivella shell disk beads, and red-dyed chicken feathers (to simulate Acorn Woodpecker feathers used in the past), abalone pendants

    Linda Yamane
    Old-Style Ohlone Necklace
    2019
    Clam shell disk beads, abalone pendants, glass trade beads

    Linda Yamane
    Pechump Tiprin (Bottomless Hopper Basket)
    2015
    Willow foundation rods, whiteroot sedge weaving strands, bracken fern weaving strands for dark pattern, creek dogwood rim stick, tar at lower rim

    Bundled materials in Linda Yamane’s case included: Sandbar Willow (Salix Exigua), straight shoots (peeled) and Whiteroot Sedge Carex barbarae rhizomes (peeled)


    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    08/29/2018 16:29 0.45mi, 23’53.9 53’03/mi Headlands, CA
    2020
    Acrylic and gold leaf on paper 

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    06/16/2018 12:48 59’28:3 0.54 mi, Felicita County Park, CA
    2020
    Acrylic and gold leaf on paper

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    5/08/2018, 16:23, 0.31mi, 27'38.7, 90'20/mi
    2020
    Acrylic and gold leaf on paper

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    2/25/2020, 11:44, 1.18 mi, 1:41’45, 85’53/mi
    2020
    Acrylic on MDF board

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    2/18/2020, 11:36, 1.70 mi, 1:42’35, 60’16/mi, Recology SF, CA
    2020
    Acrylic on MDF board

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    2/28/2020, 10:46, 1.67 mi., 2:06’48, 76’03/mi
    2020
    Acrylic on MDF board

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    01/04/2018 00:20 0.44mi, 32'14.6 73'43/mi, Kashan, Iran
    2020
    Acrylic and gold leaf on paper

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    01/03/2018 03:25 0.51mi, 14'58.9 29'20/mi, Kashan, Iran
    2020
    Acrylic and gold leaf on paper

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    01/04/2018, 03:43 1.50mi, 1:13'59 49'29/mi, Kashan, Iran
    2020
    Acrylic and gold leaf on paper

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    12/26/2018, 04:58 0.69 mi, 1:03’05, 91’16/mi
    2020
    Acrylic on MDF board

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    12/24/2018, 00:43, 0/17 mi, 09’22.2, 55’50/mi, Hormuz Island, Iran
    2020
    Acrylic on MDF board

    Minoosh Zomorodinia
    My Ziggurat
    2021
    Birch wood, MDF, gold leaf, acrylic, wood glue, and digital print on sand

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    Byron Au Yong found paper art piece

    Artist Statement

    In his 1962 novel Island, philosopher Aldous Huxley wrote: “Western intellectuals are all sitting-addicts. That’s why most of you are so repulsively unwholesome.” My training as a composer included repulsively unwholesome years sitting with paper and pencils drawing circles and lines. My life as a musician awakens as I sketch Forest Requiem, where people listen to and sing with the trees. I encourage you to join me as I walk and fold, reach and discover.


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    Bryan Au Yong

    Byron Au Yong creates participatory events Variety calls “claustrophobic and expansive, intimate and existential, personal and political all at once.” Examples include Activist Songbook to counteract hate and energize movements, Kidnapping Water: Bottled Operas for hiking singers and percussionists, Turbine for the 200th anniversary of the Fairmount Waterworks, and Yíjū 移居 (to migrate) for the Jack Straw New Media Gallery. Honors include a Creative Capital Award and Time Warner Foundation Fellowship.

     

     

    Artist Recommended Resources

    • Read: Up in Flames: The Ephemeral Art of Pasted-Paper Sculpture in Taiwan, by Ellen Johnston Laing and Helen Hui-ling Liu (2004), Gleeson call no. NB1270.P3 L35 2004
    • Watch: Golden Venture, documentary directed by Peter Cohn (2006)
    • Visit: Rainforest Action Network
    • Visit: STAND.earth
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    Nicole Dixon, "The Snake And The Raffia Tree," acrylic, charcoal, watercolor, and gold leaf on canvas, 2018

    Artist Statement

    Art as ritual is a core element of my practice. Navigating this world as a Black woman, I use art to find the transcendent purpose of my experiences and create cathartic figures. Each mixed media material has its own resonance, and the layering reflects the complexity of the subject matter. The natural, cultural, and spiritual symbols reflect, embolden, and honor the figures. I hope viewers walk away associating unapologetic blackness with beauty, power, abundance, and spirit.


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    Nicole Dixon

    Nicole Dixon is an Oakland native, who in 2002 earned a BA in Studio Art from Spelman College in Atlanta. Since her first commission in 1995, her work has evolved into mixed-media pieces that center and pay homage to black experiences and identity. In addition to a robust exhibition history, she has been a Montessori preschool teacher for decades, and teaching art has taken her as far as the Kalahari as a guest art instructor.

     

     

    Artist Recommended Resources

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    Katie Dorame, "Grinding Acorns Over You,"  inkjet print: digitized collage, 25" x 36.5", 2019

    Artist Statement

    My work is filled with actors, film stills, costumes, artifacts, sea life, painted lines, and technicolor. I make pieces that build my own directorial vision: reclaiming, recasting, and re-working land, roles, and history. I use genres, both film and art historical, to question romanticized views of the past that have persisted.

    In the series CA Collages, scenes within scenes are overlapped, building compressed moments in time, looking to the future, overseeing the land, reclaiming a place real and often mythologized.


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    Katie Dorame

    Katie Dorame (Tongva) is a visual artist born in Los Angeles, currently living and working in Oakland. Dorame’s work has recently been exhibited at Shulamit Nazarian in Los Angeles, Guerrero Gallery in San Francisco, Form and Concept in Santa Fe and the de Saisset Museum in Santa Clara. She has attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe as an artist in residence, and contributed to SFMOMA’s Open Space project blog. She has also contributed to the Facebook Open Arts mural project.

     

     

    Artist Recommended Resources

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    Alicia Escott, still from "The Archive to Come: a letter to covid19 in a seed," Digital video, 3 minutes 58 seconds, 2020-2021

    Artist Statement

    My practice is in solidarity with thinkers across fields undoing the construct of “nature” as a thing separated from us and our world. This work is informed by how we are each negotiating our immediate day-to-day realities and responsibilities amid the specter of climate emergency, mass-extinction, subsequent social and political unrest, and unspoken individual and collective experiences of loss, heartbreak, and longing. I approach these issues with an interstitial practice encompassing writing, drawing, painting, photography, video, sculpture, social-practice, and activism.


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    Alicia Escott

    Alicia Escott’s work has been included in exhibitions at Berkeley Arts Center, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Headlands Center for the Arts, Berkeley Art Museum, and Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbra. She/they have been an Artist in Residence at Recology, The Growlery, Djerassi, Anderson Ranch, Irving Street Projects and The JB Blunk Residency. Escott is a founding member of 100 Days Action and The Bureau of Linguistical Reality. Her work has been featured in The Economist, The New Yorker, KQED, The San Francisco Chronicle, Momus and others.

     

     

    Artist Recommended Resources

    • Read: The mushroom at the end of the world: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins (2021), by Anna Tsing
    • Read: Capitalism in the Web of Life (2015), by Jason W Moore
    • Read: Braiding Sweetgrass (2013), by Robin Wall Kimmerer
    • Read: Being Ecological (2018), by Timothy Morton
    • Read: Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds, by adrienne maree brown
    • Listen: For The Wild (podcast)
    • Watch: Intelligent Trees
    • Watch: The Story of Plastic
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    Felicitas Fischer, Conni McKenzie, and Jaime Serra dos Santos, "Lungs of the Earth," dance film, 8 minutes 22 seconds, 2021

    Artist Statements

    Felicitas Fischer
    I am a contemporary dance artist working, teaching, and creating in the Bay Area. My artistic approach incorporates diverse dance practices from around the world and reflects my own polyethnic-cultural experience through the means of storytelling + reclamation + resistance. I recognize our bodies and kinesthetic presence as fundamentally political statements with the power to transmit unspoken truths, becoming self-evident through our authentic expression and movement.

    Conni McKenzie
    I am a dancer, filmmaker, and digital artist. My work focuses on dance film and cinematography, but also includes photography, documentary film, and interdisciplinary digital arts. Through my practice, I hope to increase the diversity in storytelling and use dance as a method for healing, creative expression, education, and advocating for social justice causes.

    Jaime Serra dos Santos
    I am on a mission to inspire millions of people around the world through my artist persona “saint hills” and make a positive impact on the planet. Through being myself and stopping at nothing to live out this purpose, I hope to inspire everyone who crosses paths with me to find their authenticity, purpose, and to live out their dreams as well.


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    Felicitas Fischer

    Originally from Seattle, Felicitas Fischer grew up classically trained in ballet and modern and has performed in various works by local and international choreographers throughout her career. Besides dancing and teaching in the Bay Area, she also works closely with movement therapist Jennifer Bury, contributes annually to the online dance journal Stance on Dance, and is the founder of Artists for Justice, an artistic collective dedicated to supporting diverse emerging artists and local social-justice initiatives.

     

     

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    Conni McKenzie

    Conni McKenzie has trained in a variety of dance styles and had the opportunity to study dance with several New York companies before relocating to San Francisco. During college, Conni began her relationship with film to learn how to capture dance on camera. Her work has been featured in film festivals all over the country and several places around the globe. In addition to her projects, Conni continues to train, perform, and teach dance in the Bay Area.

     

     

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    Jaime Serra dos Santos

    Jaime Serra dos Santos is a music producer, performer, sound designer, and audio engineer who works in the multi-disciplinary realms of sound and music. Born in Brasília, Brazil, he came to the Bay Area in 2015 to pursue a degree in Performing Arts & Social Justice as well as a life as an artist in California. His artist persona, "saint hills" can be described as an artist who creates worlds through music because he is an alien in his own planet. His original music embodies the unique experience of belonging everywhere and nowhere at the same time.

     

     

    Artist Recommended Resources

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    Barnali Ghosh, "Happy Poppy," photograph, 24” x 24”, 2021

    Artist Statement

    Some folks made sourdough. I took to taking photos of myself dressed like the flowers in my neighborhood. In these pandemic times of grief and isolation, the Unfaithful Recreation series has allowed me to feel joy, delight, and connection. For the floral version of the series, I use Odissi dance and South Asian saris to weave stories for myself about California’s native flowers, tinged with the pleasure and pain of recovering fabrics, dance, and indigenous landscapes that have been disrupted by colonialism.

    My creative work is rooted in the process of turning personal and systemic trauma into moments of joy, whether it’s in the form of street theater celebrating South Asian American resistance movements, or taking photos of plants at night after the loss of a parent.

    Share your reactions with me on instagram @berkeleywali.


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    Barnali Ghosh

    Barnali Ghosh is a designer and storyteller, and a public transit, walking, and biking advocate. She co-founded the award-winning Berkeley South Asian Radical History Walking Tour, which uses storytelling and theater to share narratives of local South Asian American resistance movements, from immigrant freedom fighters in the 1910’s to queer and feminist organizing a century later. She has curated two art shows, Our Name is Rebel and Rebel Legacy (with Kearny Street Workshop) based on these histories. Much of her work explores the connections between home and homeland.

     

     

    Artist Recommended Resources

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    Linda Yamane, "Ohlone Honoring Basket," willow, whiteroot sedge, olivella shell beads, feathers, and abalone, 9.75” x 5.75” x 4”, 2012

    Artist Statement

    My artwork is rooted in the traditions and cultural practices of my Ohlone ancestors. Using natural materials found on California’s central coast, I make utilitarian and ceremonial baskets, dance regalia, tule reed boats, and a variety of day-to-day items using ancient technologies not widely practiced today. I spend much of my life on the land—harvesting the necessary plants, digging for roots, foraging for certain shells and feathers, and bridging the past with the present.


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    Linda Yamane

    Linda Yamane is an Ohlone artist and tribal scholar who lives in the Monterey area, the homeland of her Rumsen Ohlone ancestors. She is most known for bringing back the lost art of Ohlone basketmaking, and her artworks can be seen at numerous Bay Area interpretive exhibits – including Land’s End, San Francisco Presidio’s Officers Club & Presidio Visitor Center, Oakland Museum of California, Sanchez Adobe Interpretive Center in Pacifica, and Santa Clara University’s deSaisset Museum.

     

     

    Artist Recommended Resources

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    Minoosh Zomorodinia, "08/29/2018 16:29 0.45mi, 23’53.9 53’03/mi Headlands, CA," acrylic and gold leaf on paper, 2.7” x 5.5”, 2020

    Artist Statement

    Informed by my cultural background, religion, and politics, my work investigates the concept of “Self,” specifically how it relates to the environment. Inspired by nature, utilizing walking and sometimes infusing humor, I integrate contradictory concepts into pieces that visualize struggles of the "self" by inserting my body into these moments of time and space. By tracking my paths using technology, I claim the ownership of the land, while representing a changed perception in the digital age.


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    Minoosh Zomorodinia

    Minoosh Zomorodinia is an Iranian-born interdisciplinary artist who makes visible the emotional and psychological reflections of her mind's eye inspired by her environment. Zomorodinia has received several awards, residences, grants and exhibited locally and internationally. She serves on Southern Exposures’s Curatorial Council, Berkeley Art Center Program Committee, and a Board Member of Women Eco Artists Dialog. She earned her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute, and MA and BA from Azad University in Tehran.

     

     

    Artist Recommended Resources

    • Read: Braiding Sweetgrass (2013), by Robin Wall Kimmerer
    • Read: Walking Art Practice (2018), by Ernesto Pujol
    • Visit: Eco Art Space
    • Listen: KQED

All that you touch: art and ecology Education Resources

Unmuted: The 22nd Thacher Art + Architecture Annual

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DJ Hoffman, "GMom," 2020, digital portrait, 11.7" x 8.8"

May 7 – July 30, 2021

Online exhibition and programs
Thacher Gallery, University of San Francisco

Following a year during which our collective interactions have primarily occurred virtually, the 22nd Thacher Annual playfully responds to the now ubiquitous phrase, “You’re on mute!” While the impacts of the pandemic have left many feeling disconnected and stifled, Unmuted provides a platform for University of San Francisco student artists to speak out, express themselves, and let their creative voices be heard.

The exhibition presents 64 works by junior and senior majors and minors from USF’s Department of Art + Architecture. With themes ranging from isolation to our dependence on the natural environment, the featured works represent an honest vocalization of emotions, experiences, and discoveries made during the silence of the pandemic. Through these artworks, viewers are invited to reflect on their own experiences during the past year.

Unmuted is presented by USF’s Thacher Gallery and Art History & Museum Studies Thacher Practicum class led by Nell Herbert. Student curators include Evan Carlson, Shannon Foley, Christina Gazi, Maria Ivanyuk, Julia Kea, Catherine Pluimer, Nora Robbins, Zoe Sun, and Quinna Xia. Exhibited artworks were selected by jurors Jenna Marie Blair, Eddie Herena, Cynthia Hooper, and Weston Teruya.

Featured Artists

  • Joshua Alas
  • Jazz Alcanices
  • Max Amido
  • Sonja Angst
  • Arantza Aramburu
  • Megan Babigian
  • Tessa Bartholio
  • Samanda Beeman
  • Nicole Belton
  • Valerie Bravo
  • Sam Cadenas-Arzate
  • Dana Capistrano
  • Angelica Carinugan
  • Brandi Chang
  • Joanne Chu
  • Courtney Crother
  • Louise de Oliveira
  • Natalie Ferrer
  • DJ Hoffman
  • Maria Ivanyuk
  • Gabrielle Kim
  • Nathan Lee
  • Danae Lenda
  • Margarita Lopez-Dale
  • Allyssa Mabute
  • Jenna Mansperger
  • Camilla Martinez
  • Natalie Morris
  • Tanvi Murugesh
  • My Nguyen
  • Lauren Nipper
  • Natalie Ortez-Arevalo
  • Milla Petrolino
  • Ariane Corrine Reyes
  • Eduardo Reyes
  • Paola Reyes Melendez
  • Lucas Ricci
  • Mary Lou Grace Robison
  • Tomas Rodriguez
  • Sebastian Rojas
  • Coco Romano Giordano
  • Emma Schwartz
  • Aneesha Solomon
  • Somer Taylor
  • Mai Ly Torres Baker
  • Josephine Tov
  • Brianna Vargas
  • Xingyi Wang
  • Halle Watson
  • Ryan Williams

Acknowledgements

The Thacher Practicum class would like to thank the following people for their contributions to the Unmuted exhibition project:

Jenna Marie Blair, Kevin B. Chen, Eddie Herena, Cynthia Hooper, Weston Teruya, Rio Yañez, USF’s Department of Web Services, and the Thacher Gallery team: Victoria Farlow, Andrea Gonzales (designer), Nell Herbert, Ariane Corinne Reyes, Glori Simmons, and Somer Taylor.

Pulled Apart

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Terry Berlier, Installation view of “Waiting for the Other Shoe to…,” 2020, shoes, motors, Arduino, pulleys, ethernet cable, electronics, wood, 30’ x 15’ x 20’, photo credit: Terry Berlier, installation photo from Stanford Art Gallery

March 1-April 25, 2021

Online exhibition and programs
Thacher Gallery, University of San Francisco

Terry Berlier, Adam Chin, Cynthia Hooper, Carrie Hott, and Gail Wight

In Pulled Apart, we experience works by artists examining the mechanisms of gadgets, scientific instruments, and computer technologies to reveal the internal and external systems that help shape society.

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Clockwise, starting at top left - Details of artworks by Cynthia Hooper, Terry Berlier, Adam Chin, Carrie Hott, and Gail Wight

Each artist approaches engineering in a unique way. Terry Berlier adapts mechanical systems, microcontrollers, and software to build kinetic sculptures and installations that explore the precarity of human relationships. Using Machine Learning neural networks trained on databases of actual photographs, Adam Chin creates portraits that exist between the real and the imitation. The detailed paintings and videos by Cynthia Hooper show human infrastructure intersecting with the environment, while Carrie Hott’s videos of an evolving miniature room bring us indoors to explore how constant connectivity and hidden networks inform our decisions. Finally, Gail Wight’s anatomical studies of mechanical toys we see the uncanny ways that nature and the human-made reflect each other.

Whether it be the use of the 16th century Cardan Gear or 21st century computer algorithms, each artist's approach reminds viewers of the possibilities of engineering as well as our complex relationship with the systems we've created.

A digital catalog with additional text from the artists is available upon request: thachergallery@usfca.edu.

Co-presented with USF’s Engineering Program

Pulled Apart brings USF Engineering professors in conversation with these artists to illuminate the elements of engineering in the artists’ practices. Join us for our opening event and public programs:

  • Monday, Mar. 1, 5-6:30 p.m.
    Opening celebration with the artists
    Followed by a conversation with engineer Lou Sassoubre and artist Cynthia Hooper
  • Monday, Mar. 22, 5-6 p.m.
    Engineer Genna Smith in conversation with artists Terry Berlier and Gail Wight
  • Monday, Apr. 5, 5-6 p.m.
    Engineer Chris Brooks in conversation with artists Adam Chin and Carrie Hott
  • Thursday, Apr. 8, 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
    Art + Architecture Lecture Series: Exhibition tour with gallery director Glori Simmons

Acknowledgments

Artists: Terry Berlier, Adam Chin, Cynthia Hooper, Carrie Hott, and Gail Wight
Curatorial Team: Liat Berdugo, Nell Herbert, Sean Olson, and Glori Simmons
Engineering Collaborators: Hana Böttger and N. Jeremy Kasdin with Christopher Brooks, Elizabeth Mickaily-Huber, William Riggs, Lauren Sassoubre, Gennifer Smith, and Julia Thompson
Design: Ashley Boney (web) and Andrea Gonzales (‘21) (print and publicity)
Programs and preparation: Victoria Farlow, Delaney Gibbons (‘20), and Somer Taylor (‘22)

  • Can the awareness of collapse pull us out of our collective trance of individualism?

    Remote video URL
    Installation video of Waiting for the Other Shoe to…, 2020, shoes, motors, Arduino, pulleys, ethernet cable, electronics, and wood, 30’ x 15’ x 20, 2 minutes, 56 seconds (Courtesy of Stanford Art Gallery) Note: Audio includes no text. Sounds include mechanical movements and shoes hitting the concrete floor.

    Artist Statement

    In my practice, I interweave movement and sound to investigate the evolution of human connections with queerness and ecologies. This results in kinetic and sound-based sculptures and multimedia installations that work as metaphors for both harmonious and dissonant interactions. Emphasizing the essential roles played by cultural memories and environmental conditions in the creation of our identities, I excavate material objects to challenge our understanding of progress and reveal how history is constructed within a cultural landscape. Orienting, disorienting, and reorienting, my work provides tools to recover and reanimate our faltering connections with self, queerness, nature, and society, often through humor. My collaborators include engineers, composers, architects, and natural scientists.

    Image
    Shoes dangling from the ceiling, hung up by wire

    “Our country moving closer to its own truth and dread, its own ways of making people disappear.” — Adrienne Rich

    Here, I have continued ongoing threads in kinetic and sound sculpture with humor and political critique, using the common American saying “waiting for the other shoe to drop” (referring to a sense of impending doom) as my departure point. The movement is controlled by an Arduino and a series of twenty mechanical motor and pulley systems. Shown in early 2020, the exhibition closed two weeks early and remained inaccessible for six months due to another shoe dropping — a worldwide pandemic and Stanford’s campus lockdown. The shoes originally referenced global political and social instability leading to mass migration, environmental decline, and the persistent stripping away of human rights for BIPOC, queer, and trans individuals — all tragically highlighted as COVID-19 ran unbound on the world.

    Project Team:
    20+ networked and programmed motor units, developed code, electronics, built, and tested the units: Eric Rawn
    Motor system: Tom Trzpit


    Engineering Insight

    Terry Berlier’s work first struck me as beautiful examples of combining art, physics, and engineering. Beyond being visually striking, her art provides inspiration for an engineer’s work. She focuses on collapse within our world — climate change in “Tipping Point” and the general idea of collapse in “Waiting for the Other Shoe to...” — and comments on our wastefulness by using reclaimed materials. Exposing these issues through art provides a new means of motivating all of us, engineers included, to try and prevent these collapses from happening. The solutions to these problems will undoubtedly be complex and will only be accomplished through interdisciplinary collaboration. We are reminded of this key fact when we realize that Terry’s thought-provoking art is also the result of collaboration between seemingly disparate areas including sculpture and computer programming.

    As I looked past the big concepts of her work I began to see more subtle lessons and was drawn in further. A key mantra to my teaching is “learn to be comfortable being uncomfortable.” Rarely do impactful ideas/inventions come from a place of comfort. They come from pushing oneself in directions that are new and unexplored and therefore, associated with a sense of discomfort. There is an uneasy feeling that comes with viewing Terry’s art. Whether it’s the fear of the “Tipping Point” going too far, the anticipation as you “Wait for the other shoe to…,” or the confusion of watching wheels move without making progress as in “Third Wheel,” there is a sense of disquietude. I can’t help but feel that through her art, Terry is teaching all of us to embrace discomfort. Her brilliant and playful weaving of art, technology, social commentary, and dissonance can educate and inspire all of us if we let it.

    —GENNIFER SMITH, PH.D., PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING

    Remote video URL
    Installation video of Self-Leveler (aka Tipping Point), 2009, wood, metal, computer, wii remote, monitors, cables, video, motor, aluminum axe, and MAX, 
6’ x 3’ x 20”
 (Courtesy of Center for Contemporary Art, Sacramento) Note: This video has no audio.

    In order to capture the moment of catastrophe, the human-made “tipping point,” this work creates an uncomfortable situation where the sculpture appears to almost fall over. I used MAX programming and a Wii remote’s potentiometer to keep the video water level while the sculpture rocks back and forth with the axe's counterbalancing force. Here, symbols of technical progress are also emblematic of environmental decline.

    MAX programming: Ricardo Rivera

    Image
    Self-Leveler (aka Tipping Point)
    Remote video URL
    Installation video of Third Wheel, 2013, wood, metal, motors, hardware, 36″ x 30″ x 28″, 31 seconds (Courtesy of Institute of Contemporary Art San José) Note: Audio includes room ambience and movement of gears, no text.

    Three vintage wagon wheels are rendered stationary while two kinetic movements perform. The Cardan Gear is a 16th century invention used to convert rotation motion to reciprocating linear motion without using linkages or slideways, while the four bar linkage on the opposite side draws an infinity symbol. This sculpture alludes to the felt sense of exclusion in intimate groupings, when you recognize that you are not moving in the same ways despite being closely connected.

    Remote video URL
    Model test of four-bar linkage (left) and Cardan Gear (right). 1 minute, 12 seconds. Note: Audio includes sound of mechanisms turning, no text.

    Artist Biography

    Terry Berlier is an interdisciplinary artist who investigates the evolution of human interaction with queerness and ecologies. She has exhibited in solo and group shows in North America, Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia including at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, The Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, and Contemporary Art and Spirits in Osaka, Japan. Berlier is an Associate Professor and Director of the Sculpture Lab in the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University.

  • What does a pixel know?

    Image
    Man #1, 2020, Machine Learning generated, archival pigment print, 22”x22"

    Artist Statement

    I use Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms to render images and make art. In practice, I train Machine Learning neural networks on databases of real photography and have them produce new “photographs.” To do this I either have to find a database of photographs to train on, or I have to make a database of photographs.

    Asking, “What does a pixel know?,” I treat photography on a metaphorical atomic level, which is the pixel level. Every pixel in a photograph has knowledge about the overall scene that was photographed, and I am trying to tease this information out of the pixel. For example, when you use a Photoshop or Instagram filter to alter a photograph, you are using math to manipulate the information contained in the pixels. By understanding what a pixel knows, I am trying to expand our understanding of how much information is contained in a given photograph. I am exploring what a photograph knows.

    Engineering Insight

    "What does a pixel know?" At its lowest level, a pixel is data — a set of ones and zeroes. When we view those bits as groups of 16, information emerges — representations of color and luminance. When we step back and look at groups of pixels, structure and features emerge — a nose, an eye, or a freckle. Another step back, and the features combine to form a face. But where does this knowledge reside? Is an arrangement of pixels a face because of their geometry, or because we as viewers impose this meaning on them?

    Adam Chin's work challenges us to think more carefully about this question by using algorithmic methods to generate new and unique images from a collection of "real" images. (And what is "real" in this setting?) When we see a new, synthetic image of President Obama, one that's distorted but still clearly recognizable, are we taking in knowledge captured by those pixels, or imposing our own previous understanding and experience? And when we turn to “Man #1,” does that question change? Unlike President Obama, we have never seen this person before, and yet we recognize him, and fill in those missing details. The “Evolution” video presses this point further as we see the algorithm generate progressively more “face-like” images, even though it works without any understanding of what a face is; that knowledge emerges from a combination of the relationship between pixels and our own expectations, hardwired into our visual cortex through millions of years of evolution.

    —CHRISTOPHER BROOKS, PH.D., PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENTS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    Remote video URL
    Evolution, 2020, Machine Learning generated, video, 3:12 minutes (Note: Audio includes no text. Music is “Satie Ladybug” by Daniel Lanark.)

    In this SAGAN series, I use the algorithm, Self-Attention Generative Adversarial Networks, to generate portraits. I take a database of roughly 800 photographs and task the neural net with producing an image that looks like one of the 800 photos. The image is not a “Xerox” copy of any one of the 800, but is instead trying to look indistinguishable from the set of 800. If you were to look at all of the images mixed together, the goal is to not be able to tell the difference between the real photographs and the fake.

    To me, these portraits are interesting precisely because they fail to reach that goal. The viewer can tell the difference between the real photographs and the fake. Yet on an artistic level, the Machine Learning generated images are still valid portraits of the subjects depicted. For this algorithm, the art is found in the distance between the real and the fake.

    Artist Biography

    Adam Chin is a fine art photographer who spent a career as a computer graphics artist for TV and film, working on such films as Shrek 2, Madagascar, and How to Train Your Dragon. He studied photography and printmaking under Barry Umstead at RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco. He currently practices using Machine Learning neural networks trained on databases of real photography to render images.

  • How can infrastructure serve the human and nonhuman with equal care?

    Image
    Tijuana: Diamond Home, 2008, oil on panel, 11” x 14”

    Artist Statement

    My interdisciplinary practice examines infrastructural landscapes and their myriad cultural and biological entanglements — sites that include altered watersheds, reconstructed wilderness, brownfields, power grids, and industrial farmland. My work patiently frames and makes sensible the incidental and emblematic activities that define these complex places, and also offers alliance with the laborers, activists, and researchers who operate within them. My videos, essays, and paintings deploy nuanced perceptual strategies scaffolded by disciplined, research-focused inquiry.

    The work in this exhibition includes a video and selections from three series of paintings. My “Tijuana” paintings describe the hand-made homes and domestic infrastructure of several informal border communities — sprawling settlements borne of NAFTA-fueled upheavals in the Mexican economy. The DIY engineering that comprises these communities embodies a modest yet courageous humility; these places are built entirely from scratch with compelling improvisation and the available materials at hand.

    Image
    East Mojave: Seismic Device, 2005, oil on panel, 8” x 10”

    My “East Mojave” paintings examine unassuming scientific instrumentation at a research facility in California’s Mojave National Preserve. Similarly, my “Landfills” paintings describe the monitoring and extraction devices of a vast retired landfill near my home in northern California. Gas wells siphon methane from beneath the landfill’s bucolic surface, while leachate wells pump noisome effluent from its subterranean strata.

    Image
    Landfills: Landfill Apparatus, 2004, oil on panel, 6” x 9”

    Engineering Insight

    Cynthia Hooper invites dialog on the social and environmental impacts of geopolitical and engineered systems. Her painting and landscape video pieces symbolically portray the highly complex and nuanced issues of our society that technology is often situated within. The unsaid request within her work is to create a new way of being. How might we, designers and engineers, create technology that supports environmental harmony rather than conflict?

    The Jefferson’s Monuments video is a compilation of short clips associated with the region’s controversial dams. It is named after a mythical fifty-first state imagined for rural northern California and Southern Oregon. The construction of multiple dams devastated salmon habitat, and with it, the foundations of the local Yurok, Karuk, and Klamath cultures. Salmon could no longer swim upstream to spawn because the dams blocked the river's flow and their spawning beds were flooded. Indigenous people could no longer count on the fish that impacted their physical and spiritual wellbeing. Through use of the buzzing of electrical wires, agriculture watering, and loud humming on still waters, Cynthia utilizes these combined aurals and visuals to denote the impacts of colonialism on the natural environment in this region.

    Subject to political changes in the United States, indigenous activists have shifted the fate of these dams, which will likely be removed in the coming decade. Deconstruction is a step towards decolonization, providing a path to bring salmon back to the region and the way of life for the Yurok, Karuk, and Klamath people. Yet, the natural environment will be forever changed and the cultural conflicts of the people on the land will remain. As engineers and designers, we are continuously creating technology with deep political implications that may be felt for generations to come. There is a responsibility to engage in such dialog and create technology that brings healing and harmony to the natural landscapes and people within.

    —JULIA THOMPSON, PH.D., ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AND FACULTY DIRECTOR OF THE INNOVATION HIVE AND ENGINEERING PARTNERSHIPS, DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING

    Remote video URL
    Jefferson's Monuments, 2010, digital video with sound, running time 7 minutes, 54 seconds Note: Video has no text. Sounds include birds, water, and wind.

    The video “Jefferson’s Monuments” patiently inventories four controversial dams that are slated for removal on California’s and Oregon’s mighty Klamath River. After more than 20 years of activism by tribal groups, scientists, activists, and fisherfolk, dismantling these dams will finally commence in 2023. “Jefferson’s Monuments” is a meditative moving image epitaph for these unexpectedly grand and undeniably problematic monuments in their dramatic Cascade Range environment.

    My creative practice is shaped by the conceptual rigor of science and the advocacy of environmental policy. Many of my projects also include accompanying essays that recoup expository content not explicitly conveyed via visual means. These essays are an entry point for cross-disciplinarity, and are calibrated for researchers, activists, and stakeholders who seek rigorous yet actionable public scholarship. By creating conduits between specialized fields of study, my artistic practice attempts to reshape (or at least attempts active dialog with) the technological and social systems I work with.

    Artist Biography

    Cynthia Hooper's videos, essays, paintings, and research-based projects examine infrastructural landscapes in the United States and Mexico. She has exhibited and screened her work at the Center for Land Use Interpretation in Los Angeles and the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City, among other cultural institutions. Grants and residencies include the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts and Headlands Center for the Arts. Publications include Places Journal and Arid: A Journal of Desert Art, Design and Ecology. She currently lives and teaches in Humboldt County, CA.

  • Where are we in relationship to the edges of the systems that surround us?

    Remote video URL
    A Room Of Edges (part one), 2021, digital video, 2 minutes (First of a five-part series, scroll down for others).

    Video Transcript

    Artist Statement

    I am invested in documenting and disentangling the technological systems that deeply shape our lives. Specifically, I am captivated by what provides a sense of comfort and security, or keeps us working and productive, or entertained, all while quietly mediating all of our surroundings and experiences, often in very subtle and insidious ways. Some broad examples of these systems include artificial lighting, the electrical grid, the internet, and Internet of Things devices. I am not only interested in dissecting the history and impacts of these structures, but through my projects I am aiming to make visible the inherently political nature of these systems and how they influence us both privately and collectively.

    My process is iterative and driven by research, which can be drawn from a text, a dissection of a smart object, or a visit to a power plant, for example. This research process is continuous and varying and deeply informs what I make and how I make it. Most often I create multi-media installations that incorporate sound or video into sculptural settings. I also regularly make books and prints, or put together free form group classes. Frequently, all of these forms are present in one project, providing multiple layers of experience or entry points into a subject.

    Remote video URL
    A Room Of Edges (part two), 2021, digital video, 2 minutes, 4 seconds.

    Video Transcript

    Engineering Insight

    We live in a world that is at once increasingly complex and also increasingly abstract. With a phrase, or the push of a button, we can have the answer to any question, or listen to any recorded music, or watch whatever we want. We don't need to care how it gets to us or how decisions are made. Until we do. Until things break down and the system reaches its limitations, its points of failure and brittleness. Then the illusion fades and we see the underlying technologies, messy and incomplete, no longer able to fool us. Carrie Hott's work pushes us to consider that view — a view in which the illusion of intelligence in our devices erodes, and the edges: physical edges, functional edges, and emotional edges, become visible. As the functionality breaks down, the illusion of the room itself degrades, and what initially seemed well-ordered and helpful becomes chaotic and alienating, leading us to wonder whether these technologies were really intended to improve our lives in the first place.

    —CHRISTOPHER BROOKS, PHD, PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENTS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    Remote video URL
    A Room Of Edges (part three), 2021, digital video, 2 minutes, 11 seconds.

    Video Transcript

    Remote video URL
    A Room Of Edges (part four), 2021, digital video, 2 minutes, 2 seconds.

    Video Transcript

    Remote video URL
    A Room Of Edges (part five), 2021, digital video, 4 minutes, 35 seconds.

    Video Transcript

    Most recently my studio practice has been focused on the use (and misuse) of smart devices, which are consumer objects that rely on internet connectivity to provide services and convenience, usually in the home. I arrived at this point after a decade of considering the history of artificial light and the electrical grid in this country, and how the development of these common systems shaped so much of our entrenched behavior and work patterns. The emergence of internet connected (or smart) lights and devices in recent years has completely captivated my thinking. This new technology builds directly on to the subjects that I have researched and made work about for years. Now that the internet is weaving into the technology that we rely on heavily, my thinking and art practice is focused on how these structures, devices, and objects are becoming more complex, entrenched, fragile, and manipulative.

    Artist Biography

    Carrie Hott is an interdisciplinary artist based in Oakland, California. She is invested in documenting and disentangling the technological systems that deeply shape our lives. She has presented her work as part of exhibitions and projects across the country, most recently at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Recology San Francisco, and the Museum of Capitalism in Oakland. She is the recipient of the Artadia Award, a Cultural Humanities grant, and has had residencies at Mills College and Headlands Center for the Arts. She currently teaches in USF’s Department of Art + Architecture and UC Berkeley’s department of Art Practice.

  •  

    What life forms will survive the sixth extinction to repopulate this beautiful planet?

    Image
    Anatomies, 2003, 9 pigment prints, aluminum bar & silk cord, 68" x 42–54" each

    Artist Statement

    In our seemingly boundless capacity for species self-love, we tend to simplify the living world around us, or fathom its depths solely for what it might teach us about ourselves. In Anatomies, I took a handful of classic metal children’s toys and disassembled them, arranging their mechanical parts into anatomical charts, the quintessential tool of Cartesian understanding. A few robots round out the menagerie, weary reminders of our automata fantasies. The individual names come from their packaging.

    I continue to struggle between parts and wholes, between the intimate and breathtaking details of life and the staggeringly complex world they embody. I’m learning to make peace with the knowledge that I’ll never truly experience or even comprehend other ways of being in the world.

    Engineering Insight

    Gail Wight’s work brings to mind a child's natural inclination to break toys apart to understand how they work and what's inside. Indeed, it is through this sense of curiosity and wonder that children exhibit their natural engineering talents. It is through the process of breaking things apart and attempting to put them back together that the engineering mind is formed. What's more, the toys that Gail selected to represent are incredible toys from a by-gone era when everything was made to last a lifetime. The colors are vibrant and each mechanical piece is an engineering work of art in and of itself. These toys were more than likely handcrafted by mechanical artisans and Gail's genius has brought to light the incredible “anatomies” of these mechanical toys. What's more, the animals that are represented are veritable engineering feats of nature. The motion by which a butterfly or a bird flies through the air with grace and ease brings the fluid mechanical concepts of lift and drag into focus. Or the way a duck frantically moves its small webbed feet under water while giving the impression of calmly gliding across the water is yet another marvel of creation. Gail's selection of toys goes from those that represent the genius of nature to those that represent the intellect of humans, from animals to little robots. The robots that are pulled apart exhibit even more mechanical intricacy with additional pieces and further complexity, for such is the world of engineering — a world of creativity and ingenuity waiting to be explored.

    —ELIZABETH MICKAILY-HUBER, PH.D., ADJUNCT PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING

    Artist Biography

    Gail Wight has taught in the Art Practice program at Stanford since 2003, focusing on experimental media. Working primarily in experimental photography, video, interactive media, and printmaking, Wight’s work examines the interplay between art and biology. Her exhibition record includes dozens of solo exhibitions throughout North America and Great Britain, and her work has been collected by numerous institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, Yale University, and Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Spain.