Become The Monuments That Cannot Fall

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Matchboxes with "divest from your self" written on them.

Nov. 19, 2020-Feb. 14, 2021

Thacher Gallery at USF & 3rd Street Corridor, Bayview

Organized by guest curator Astria Suparak with USF’s MA in Museum Studies Curatorial Practicum class, Become The Monuments That Cannot Fall is a two-part exhibition project featuring the Bay Area and Washington D.C.-based art collective Related Tactics.

Beginning November 19, 2020, The future now, a sprawling, site-responsive public art project will be viewable along the 3rd Street corridor of San Francisco’s Bayview neighborhood. Commissioned by the Thacher Gallery, this poster series illuminates facets of Black life in the city and explores the state of national politics. The map below shows the 14 poster sites, all within walking distance and visible from the street.

Accompanying the poster series is a web-based survey of the group’s work at the intersection of race and culture, in conversation with the creative practices of individual members Michele Carlson, Weston Teruya, and Nathan Watson. This exhibition created by the Museum Studies Curatorial Practicum class will be viewable from December 1, 2020—February 14, 2021. A virtual opening event featuring the artists was held on Tuesday, Dec. 1, 5:30-7 p.m.

Visit the exhibition

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Screengrab of Become The Monuments That Cannot Fall exhibition website. Image text: Become the Monuments That Cannot Fall. November 19, 2020 - February 14, 2021.
Screengrab of Become The Monuments That Cannot Fall exhibition website. Image text: Become the Monuments That Cannot Fall. November 19, 2020 - February 14, 2021.
Remote video URL
Learn more about the public art project created by the art collective Related Tactics, viewable along the 3rd Street corridor of San Francisco's Bayview neighborhood from Nov. 19, 2020-Feb. 14, 2021.

Video Transcript

Acknowledgements

Artists

Related Tactics (Michele Carlson, Weston Teruya, and Nathan Watson)

Curatorial Team

Astria Suparak, guest curator and instructor
Subject Matter: Gorety Gallardo, Hannah Jeffers, Sarah Kefalas, Ashley Vairo
Design: Stephanie Kerry, Colbie Little, Alice Timmins
Visitor Experience: Miranda Bello, Justin Channels, Caillean Magee

Bayview Businesses and Storefronts Participating in The future now

Auntie April’s Chicken Waffles & Soul Food, Bayview Opera House gallery space, Economic Development on Third (EDOT), G. Mazzei & Sons’ Hardware, Gratta Wines, The Jazz Room, JN Outreach, Kennedy Market, La Laguna Taqueria, Radio Africa Kitchen, Star Market, Sunday Gather, and the representatives of 4726, and 4900 3rd St.

Curatorial Practicum Guest Speakers

Aleesa Pitchamarn Alexander, Michele Carlson, Kevin B. Chen, John Gefroh, Andrea Gonzales, Nell Herbert, Glori Simmons, Zoë Taleporos, Weston Teruya, Nathan Watson

USF Partners and Staff

USF Departments of Educational Technology Services and Marketing and Communications, Kevin Evensen, Victoria Farlow, Shannon Foley, John Gefroh, Andrea Gonzales, Nell Herbert, Eileen Lai, Kellie Samson, Glori Simmons, Somer Taylor

A Matter of Liberation: Artwork From Prison Renaissance

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Antwan “Banks” Williams, Rosa Parks, acrylic and gold leaf on canvas, 2020.

Aug. 17-Nov. 6, 2020

Curated by Antwan “Banks” Williams, A Matter of Liberation presents artists Emile DeWeaver, Eddie Herena, Sara J. Kruzan, Jason Perry, Orlando Smith, and Antwan “Banks” Williams answering the question, “What does liberation mean to you?” Through paintings, drawings, photography, collage, spoken word, and dance, these artists reveal the ways in which the pursuit for liberation unites us all.

A series of public programs (live via Zoom) will feature conversations with the artists, museum expert Sean Kelley from the Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site in Philadelphia, local social justice activists James King and Emile DeWeaver, and the co-founders of the podcast Ear Hustle.

Artists

  • Emile DeWeaver
  • Eddie Herena
  • Sara J. Kruzan
  • Jason Perry
  • Orlando Smith
  • Antwan “Banks” Williams
  • Additional Prison Renaissance Artists

Curator's Statement

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Artist Antwan "Banks" Williams

When thinking about liberation many times we focus on slaves, prisoners, and oppressed people. What if we think of liberation as an act or a shift in the climate and beliefs, a state of growth in areas that get overlooked in our day-to-day lives? If we look at liberation as the act of something, we may start to see how liberty can be obtained and sustained in many places where freedom does not reign.

While liberation looks different for each of the artists in this exhibition, all push against the boundaries that they shared for a combined total of 86 years spent inside of California’s state prisons. When culture, climate, traditions, media, and narratives are silent tools for conditioning, art is sometimes the best way to combat the many ways we have all been held captive, bound, and/or restricted. The artworks seen here reframe how we see the true value of every person. How and why is it important to create with the little agency these artists had? Why is it so important to find parallels between their perspectives and yours?

When we challenge not just the way we think, but the ways in which our minds operate, we create space to grow for generations to come. In matters of liberation, acts of defiance aren’t always breaking or standing against laws, sometimes it’s breaking and standing against the way we think.

ANTWAN “BANKS” WILLIAMS, CURATOR

Acknowledgements

This exhibition is a collaboration between Prison Renaissance and the Thacher Gallery at USF, and is co-sponsored by the Jesuit Foundation. Performance piece provided courtesy of the Artistic Ensemble.

The Thacher Gallery is grateful to all of the artists and presenters for sharing their creative work, insights, and expertise with us: Lamavis Comundoiwilla, Emile DeWeaver, Eddie Herena, Sean Kelley, James King, Sara J. Kruzan, Jimmy Medel, Jason Perry, Nigel Poor, Vasquez Ramirez, Orlando Smith, Antwan “Banks” Williams, and Earlonne Woods as well as Prison Renaissance and the Artistic Ensemble. We would also like to acknowledge the essential contributions of Reggie Daniels, Amie Dowling, Victoria Farlow, Shannon Foley, Andrea Gonzales, Shaina Hammerman, Nell Herbert, Glori Simmons, and Somer Taylor. Finally, A Matter of Liberation would not be possible without USF’s Web Services, Educational Technology Services, Lane Center, Fr. George Williams, SJ, and the many other USF programs that have supported this project as our co-sponsors and collaborators, especially the Jesuit Foundation.

  • About the Artist

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    Emile DeWeaver

    Emile DeWeaver is a Black community organizer, literary writer, and journalist who co-founded Prison Renaissance while serving a 67 years to life sentence in prison. He participated in the passage of Senate Bills 260, 261, and Proposition 57. His personal essays have been published in Rumpus and Seventh Wave, and his op-eds have been published in the Mercury News and San Francisco Chronicle. His sentence was commuted by Gov. Jerry Brown in December 2017 for his community service.

    A poem by Emile DeWeaver: Sin of Kingdoms

     

     

    Remote video URL
    Emile DeWeaver with Artistic Ensemble performing in 2018.
    Remote video URL
    Emile DeWeaver talks about writing, performing, liberation, and being true to yourself.

    About Artistic Ensemble

    The Artistic Ensemble is a troupe of 16 diverse men in prison working with 5 outside members. In our explorations to discover how we can reach the public, we also discover more about what it means to be human by connecting with each other. Our creative process is dialogic. Together we explore social inequalities with language, sound, and movement.

    It is through the collaborative effort between outside Artistic Ensemble members and incarcerated Artistic Ensemble members, that we take constraints and boundaries and turn them into tools of liberation: art, dialogues, confrontation. Our stories cannot be properly told without the echoes of our voices, you cannot picture our world unless we are behind the camera.

    There is nothing about us, without us.

    Message From the Ensemble

    The Artistic Ensemble has gone beyond the norms of entertainment for public enjoyment, or being a platform to showcase diverse talent. It’s through our creative process which is multifaceted, we have now become a tool for restorative justice and rehabilitation through performing arts. By creating introspective and socially conscious art we’ve become a vehicle for change through community building, healing and re-entry assistance for returning citizens.

    The performing arts with its universal ability to transcend the limitations of gender, race, class, and religion has allowed A.E. to create a safe space to explore the human condition, by having difficult conversations about sensitive social issues. This level of shared vulnerability opens the door to experiences, feelings, and emotions, which are the pathways to a deeper sense of empathy and understanding. In efforts to cultivate human and environmental connection.

    The performing arts, for a long time has been overlooked as being a tool for re-connecting society to its higher state. A state of human decency, kindness, and freedom: a freedom to explore the unknown, and to question what’s known. A freedom to be. A.E.’s ideals of art being a source of healing and community building in conjunction with the principles of restorative justice allows A.E. to bridge the gap between art and rehabilitation. We are forging a new path of social and environmental equity through abstract and expressive art.

    The performing arts, for a long time has been overlooked as being a tool for re-connecting society to its higher state. A state of human decency, kindness, and freedom: a freedom to explore the unknown, and to question what’s known. A freedom to be. A.E.’s ideals of art being a source of healing and community building in conjunction with the principles of restorative justice allows A.E. to bridge the gap between art and rehabilitation. We are forging a new path of social and environmental equity through abstract and expressive art.

    —Nate, Artistic Ensemble

  • Dejon

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    Photograph "Dejon" by Eddie Herena

    2018
    Digital photograph

    Rahsaan

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    Photograph "Rahsaan" by Eddie Herena

    2018
    Digital photograph

    Nica

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    Photograph "Nica" by Eddie Herena

    2018
    Digital photograph

    Jorge

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    Photograph "Jorge" by Eddie Herena

    2017
    Digital photograph

    Chiu

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    Photograph "Chiu" by Eddie Herena

    2018
    Digital photograph

    Message From the Artist

    When you think of a person in prison what comes to mind?

    The intent of my work is not necessarily aimed at breaking stereotypes, but rather, to show that the incarcerated community is made up of folks like you and me. We smile, we joke, and we cry alike, and we all have names.

    And even though our modern world sees it fit to incarcerate bodies at an alarming rate of inhumane lengths of time, we as people always find a way to smile in the darkest and dire places. That’s the essence of our humanity, and death alone has the power to take that away.

    The men portrayed here are more than a mugshot and number.

    They have names.

    —Eddie Herena, 2020

    About the Artist

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    Eddie Herena

    Throughout the final four years of his incarceration (2015-2018), Eddie Herena worked as a photographer for the San Quentin News, the inmate-produced paper at San Quentin State Prison. Self-taught on the job, Herena covered a variety of activities -- sports games, arts programs, reconciliation groups, ribbon cuttings, to name a few. His photos also captured the process of image-making itself, and feature steady cams, RODE mics, photo ops, TV crews and documentary film teams. More than any other image-maker, Herena witnessed San Quentin’s unique, outward-looking presentation of itself. The photographs featured here are portraits.

  • Untitled

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    "Untitled" art piece by Sara J. Kruzan

    Mixed media
    15.75” x 19.75”
    2019

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    Art piece "Butterfly Detail For Top" by Sara J Kruzan

    Detailed look at Untitled.

    Crying Locker

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    Art piece "Crying Locker" by Sara J Kruzan

    Acrylic on canvas
    14” x 18”
    2019

    Deeply Distressing

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    Art piece "Deeply Distressing" by Sara J Kruzan

    This piece represents and reflects the terror of others inflicting their trauma upon my soul.
    Mixed Media
    2020

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    Detailed look at art piece "Deeply Distressing"

    Detailed look at Deeply Distressing.

    A Soulful Being Having a Human Experience

    Sara Jessimy Kruzan was born January 8, 1978. She is an A- blood type, multiracial…diverse genetic makeup. Straight A student and creative writer by the age of 10. Has been expressed through public opinion to be an American activist while leading with her child sex trafficking experience qualifying her in some spaces as an expert.

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    Sara J. Kruzan

    She carries the sears of rape, violence imposed by adults upon and within her. 1995, at the age of 17, she was convicted of the first-degree murder of her trafficker, George Gilbert Howard who began to groom her for the child sex trafficking trade at the age of 11. She was sentenced to life imprisonment without parole plus 4 years as well as a $10,000 restitution fine payable to Victims Services in the State of California.

    During her 2 ½ day trial, her trauma imposing abuse was not admitted into evidence and she was not allowed to speak of it. Twelve years into her sentence, she was interviewed by Human Rights Watch where she was finally able to speak about her abuse, and as a result received national attention from individuals and judicial reform groups, who advocated for a new trial.

    On January 2, 2011, as a result of the media attention, over 5 years of dedicated work of pro bono lawyers from Perkins Coie, Kruzan was granted clemency by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, who commuted her sentence to 25 years with the possibility of parole; she remained incarcerated at the Central California Women's Facility in Chowchilla.

    In January 2013, her sentence was reduced to second-degree manslaughter and 15 + 4 years, effectively time served, making her eligible for a parole hearing. She was found suitable on her first parole hearing on June 12, 2013, and the decision was forwarded to Governor Jerry Brown.

    On October 25, 2013, Brown took no action on the parole board decision, thereby effectively confirming it, allowing the parole board to proceed with the parole of Kruzan. On October 31, 2013, she was released before dawn from Central California Women’s facility.

    What Has She Been Doing With Herself

    • Advocating from the inside out, outside in as well for us, who have been deeply impacted by the criminal justice system.
    • A momma and example to a colorful essence of 5 years doused in brand-new morphed energy… that is going on 16!
    • Doing her best to be mindful and present while healing the decades of trauma experienced…aka interfacing with her demons with creativity.
    Remote video URL
    Sara J Kruzan talks about painting on walls, empowerment, and how to express liberation through art.

    Video Transcript

  • My Chained Response

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    Painting "My Chained Response" by Jason Perry

    Acrylic on canvas board
    16” x 20”
    2017

    Jason's Description

    Audio Transcript

    Perfection

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    Art piece "Perfection" by Jason Perry

    Acrylic on canvas board
    32” x 20”

    Jason's Description

    Audio Transcript

    My Idea

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    Art piece "My Idea" by Jason Perry

    Acrylic on canvas board
    11” x 14”
    2020

    Jason's Description

    Audio Transcript

    About the Artist

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    Jason Perry

    I am Jason Perry the youngest of five children. I was raised by a single Mother in Compton California. Confused by my surroundings at a very young age, I realized I could use my art to escape from my reality. I wanted to express the things I had seen, the feelings that I felt so I began to write, to draw and paint and I never stopped. My art comes from a place of anguish and love. The anguish is from the brutality that I see inflicted on my people. But, the love is the beauty that I see in those very same people. This is the inspiration to continue my expressions.

    Remote video URL
    Jason Perry talks about liberation, artistic style, and using art as a coping mechanism.

    Video Transcript

  • Next Grueling Report: The Lost City of White Male Privilege

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    "Next Grueling Report" web comic, see transcript.

    Graphite and colored pencil on paper
    11” x 14”
    2020

    Comic Transcript

    La Manifestation

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    Comic "La Manifestation" by Orlando Smith

    Graphite and colored pencil on paper
    14” x 11”
    2020

    Comic Transcript

    A System Cannot Fail Those It Was Never Designed 2 Protect

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    Comic "A system cannot fail those it was never designed 2 protect" by Orlando Smith

    Graphite and colored pencil on paper
    18” x 14”
    2020

    Comic Transcript

    Artist Statement

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    Orlando Smith

    I was born an artist. It’s meditative and has no limits to the worlds that can be built. My goal is to reach critical success among my peers in the genre of comics and graphic novels, and to expose injustice and advocate prison reform and social issues through art. My sources of inspiration include Yahweh, my mother, Delores Smith, Stan Lee, Marvel Comics, artist Wally Wood, Frank Miller, Frank Frazetta, Greg Cappullo, Dr. Cornel West, C.G. Jung, Yisrayl Hawkins, F. Nietzsche, Ziglzigler, Robert Fitzgerald “RZA” Diggs, 50th Law, and Bruce Lee.

    About the Artist

    Orlando Smith has created and composed over 57 graphic novels and comic books. His work has appeared in Heavy Metal, and he’s completed a host of commission work including covers for Omega Comics. He did storyboards for the movie Social Tick and for the upcoming film Charlie Charlie. Before Smith was a graphic novelist, he spent six years as a professional tattoo artist and ten years doing custom art on cars.

    Currently serving eight life sentences under California’s three-strikes law for eight counts of armed robbery, he is a self-taught illustrator, comic book creator, artist, writer, colorist, storyboard artist, illustrative journalist, political cartoonist, prison reformist, social activist, comic book historian.

    Learn more about Orlando Smith’s petition for commutation as well as the Covid-19 epidemic spreading at San Quentin.

  • 14 Years

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    Art piece "14 years" by Antwan Banks

    Acrylic and gold leaf on canvas
    30” x 24”
    2020

    This series of acrylic and gold leaf paintings is inspired by the constant conditioning of the world we live in. These pieces are driven by the narratives we have been told and we tell ourselves to sometimes justify our lack of awareness about issues that may not always affect us. They are all driven by historical context and lived experiences.

    George Stinney Jr. is the youngest person to be executed in America. He was 14 years old when he was executed in South Carolina in 1944. He was convicted of murdering two white girls ages 7 and 11. Seventy years later his conviction was overturned when the courts ruled he did not receive a fair trial. Under all of the writing and simple textures on the canvas I wrote BLACK TRUTH MATTERS, because at the heart of every miscarriage of justice is the truth, and what history has shown in many ways is that what people of color know to be true is often times covered up, treated as if it can be easily concealed, when it can’t be. A 14 year old boy was put on trial for a crime he did not do and was sentenced to death.

    Shaka

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    Art piece "Shaka" by Antwan "Banks" Williams

    Acrylic on canvas
    14” x 14”
    2020

    In the last 2 years of my incarceration, I lost my older brother. I had to process and grieve alone and I did that in many ways. This is my family, my flesh and blood, someone who I know needed more understanding, and I wasn’t able to provide that behind the walls. So, one night the thought just popped into my head and I felt compelled to immortalize his beautiful image that shows him holding his head high, shows his power, his faith, and his ability to see things a lot of people could not. And once I was done with that painting I felt as if I was able release other aspects of my grief.

    I love you Shaka Jihad. Rest In Paradise.

    He Is I Am

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    Art piece "He Is I Am" by Antwan "Banks" Williams

    Acrylic on canvas
    12” x 24”
    2020

    Most of the time when people (especially people of color) are profiled, it is due to negative stereotypes. So I decided to paint a man of color in a profile position because of the beauty that comes from that position, but also to make the viewer implicitly create their own narrative. With the words “HE IS, I AM” on the side to keep in mind that for every single person there are two stories. The one they tell about us, and the one we tell ourselves.

    In addition to the stories we tell ourselves, there is so much of the story that has yet to be written. I chose to leave the canvas blank, so at any given moment the story can grow, evolve, be added to. The texture is a representation of the rough transition between being seen and being understood.

    Rosa Gold

    Acrylic and gold leaf on canvas
    28” x 22”
    2020

    This piece was inspired by the iconic picture of Rosa Parks who refused to sit at the back of the bus. The thing that was so important for me to highlight is the fact that society was conditioned to believe it was wrong for people of color to sit in the front of the bus, and that conditioning is what molded the minds and eyes of so many people. I chose to have her wrapped in gold (Queen-like) because if people saw women for their divinity and royalty then our minds wouldn’t allow our actions to treat them any other way.

    Statute of Liberty

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    Art piece "Statue of Liberty" by Antwan Banks

    Acrylic and gold leaf on canvas
    24” x 36”
    2020

    I intended to have the protester bear a striking resemblance to Lady Liberty Enlightening the World because I see protesters as beacons of light and truth. Those who seek refuge from oppression often find themselves on the side of the revolt, which brings about the question written on the sign: Liberty and justice for WHO?

    About the Artist

    Antwan “Banks” Williams is a co-creator and the sound designer for the award winning podcast Ear Hustle. As a multi-faceted artist, his practices include: dance, visual arts, spoken word, as well as music composition. Antwan has performed extensively for the Marin Shakespeare Company. His choreography and directing can be seen in the work of the Artistic Ensemble, a dance/theater company in San Quentin Prison. In October of 2019, Antwan was released from prison and is currently performing music throughout the Bay Area and touring local schools, sharing his experience of being inside the Justice System.

    Remote video URL
    Antwan "Banks" Williams talks about freedom, incarceration, and his journey to painting.

    Video Transcript

  • Vasquez Ramirez

    UNTITLED (FRIDA KAHLO)

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    Art piece "Untitled (Frida Kahlo)" by Vasquez Ramirez

    Acrylic on canvas board
    16” x 28”
    2019

    UNTITLED (MUHAMMAD ALI)

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    Art piece "Untitled (Ali)" by Vasquez Ramirez

    Acrylic on canvas board
    16” x 20”
    2019


    Jimmy Medel

    RAVEN

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    Art piece "Raven" by Jimmy Medel

    Acrylic on canvas board
    16” x 20”


    Lamavis Comundoiwilla

    SUNSHINE

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    Art piece "Sunshine" by Lamavis Comundoiwilla

    Acrylic on canvas board
    16” x 20”
    2018

    MATRIARCH

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    Art piece "Matriarch" by Lamavis Comundoiwilla

    Acrylic on canvas board
    18” x 24”
    2018

    About Prison Renaissance

    Prison Renaissance was co-founded by three incarcerated people who identified the need for a new institution to support abolition: prison programs that don’t involve prison administrators. We need prison programs that contribute to making prisons obsolete, and prison programs will never do that as long as prison administrators control them. Prison Renaissance’s program goals are to use arts, media, and technology to connect incarcerated people to the communities that need them. Centering the voices of incarcerated people is paramount to ongoing debates regarding criminal justice reform and the organization’s work aims for a cultural shift that celebrates the insights of incarcerated people in both activist and creative circles.

Chrysalis: The 21st Thacher Art + Architecture Annual

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Delaney Gibbons, Color Collages, collage on paper, 2019

May 1-August 9, 2020

A sheltered state or stage of growth, a chrysalis may be a physical space or set of circumstances that allow for an individual to transform. Featuring 67 artworks by 53 junior and senior majors and minors from the University of San Francisco’s Department of Art + Architecture, Chrysalis is a representation of the artistry in vulnerability and struggle.

As viewers, we are often only privy to the end result of the artistic process. The 21st Thacher Art + Architecture Annual celebrates the labor associated with creating a piece of art, and the growth and transformation that can happen along the way. Reoccurring themes include the environment, identity, experimentation, consumerism, art history, and the city of San Francisco.

Chrysalis is presented by USF’s Thacher Gallery and Art History/Museum Studies Thacher Practicum Class led by Nell Herbert. This year’s jurors include artist Jonathan Anzalone; artist, curator and educator Kevin Chen; Matea Fish, Senior Director at Gallery Wendi Norris; and artist and curator Rio Yañez.

Remote video URL

View video transcript

Awards

Congratulations to this year's Thacher Annual award recipients!

Gloria Osuna Pérez Award : Aerin Cassano
Honorable Mentions: Yesenia Canales and Elizabeth Moore

Mary and Carter Thacher Prize: Lily Applegate and Rose Gluck
Honorable Mentions: Jen Brooks, Melissa Chang, Mikaela Nagy

Thacher Practicum Student Choice Award: Alyssa Little
Honorable Mention: Collette Golden

Artists

  • Erin Abbatiello
  • Joshua Alas
  • Matenia Altikatis
  • Lily Applegate
  • Mae Artuso
  • Jen Brooks
  • Jamie Brown
  • Juliet Buck
  • Sheila Burke
  • Carson Burns
  • Yesenia Canales
  • Brenna Carrick
  • Aerin Cassano
  • Melissa Chang
  • Ellise Chiu
  • Ellie Chung
  • Vanaka Din
  • Delaney Gibbons
  • Malaya Gibson
  • Rose Gluck
  • Collette Golden
  • Sarah Hamilton
  • Jacob Hanicak
  • Nicole Herath
  • DJ Hoffman
  • Hanna Kahn
  • Charles LaBonge
  • Sarah Lee
  • Samantha Li
  • Qiaodan Lou
  • Alyssa Lytle
  • Rongjie Ma
  • Kellie Manchester
  • Lauren Marone
  • Mackenzie Miller
  • Elizabeth Moore
  • Makaela Nagy
  • Albert Nessia
  • Julia Nollfo
  • Evanne O’Sullivan
  • Sophia Patino
  • Stephanie Pillert
  • Riley Pratt
  • Paola Reyes Melendez
  • Coco Romano Giordano
  • Amanda Sondy
  • Maxine Taylor
  • Tasha Westbrook
  • Ken Wilson
  • Sixun (Amara) Yang
  • Ji Eun Yang
  • Alexander Ziemba

Student Curators

  • Azariyah Franklin
  • Caroline Milowicki
  • Gabrielle Moreta
  • Alondra Ramos
  • Jenna Smith
  • Yiyi Yang

STUDIO VISIT: The Art + Architecture Faculty Triennial

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Mobile studio, Sanctuary City Project, Sergio De La Torre + Chris Treggiari

Mar. 3 to Apr. 8, 2020

STUDIO VISIT: The Art + Architecture Faculty Triennial presents recent art and design by twenty-seven University of San Francisco faculty alongside the spaces in which these works were made.

There is a long-held fascination with artists’ studios. The spaces utilized by these USF artists run the gamut, from a home studio to a design collective, a secluded barn to a converted warehouse, a technology-cluttered desk to a print shop on wheels. Some have no walls or structure; the artists’ subjects--nature or an urban market--have become the studio. Determined by practical matters such as tools and economy as well as creative processes, they offer insight into the essential elements that support and define each artist’s practice.

Artists include: Noopur Agarwal, Hannah Ahlblad, Rhiannon Alpers, Renata Ancona, Johnna Arnold, Sabiha Basrai, Liat Berdugo + Emily Martinez: Anxious to Make, Hana Böttger, Frank Cole, Sergio De La Torre + Chris Treggiari, Rachel Beth Egenhoefer, Steve Green, Eric Hongisto, Carrie Hott, Sandra Kelch, Kathryn Kenworth, Scott Kildall, Stuart McKee, Sean Olson, Matthew Peek, Tanu Sankalia, Tamara Suarez Porras, Mimi Sheiner, Jessica Snow, Seth Wachtel, Jenifer K Wofford, Susan Wolsborn.

STUDIO VISIT is presented by the University of San Francisco’s Thacher Gallery and the Center for Research, Scholarly, and Artistic Excellence and the Department of Art + Architecture.

Studio Visit Object List

  • Noopur Agarwal
    The Courageous Way Forward
    Poster, digital print
    2019

    Noopur Agarwal
    Alys Albers
    Web/video/projection
    2019

    Hannah Ahlblad
    Shaping Light
    Digital photo, Handmade Models: Poster board, museum board, vellum, clear acrylic
    2018

    Hannah Ahlblad
    Sunset, Lisbon
    Watercolor
    2018

    Hannah Ahlblad
    The Wall
    Drinking straws, laser cut paper, Plexiglas scraps, and black thread
    2014

    Rhiannon Alpers
    Finding Her Place | Jeanne Baret: The woman behind the naturalist
    2019

    Rhiannon Alpers
    Field Work
    2019

    Rhiannon Alpers
    Dwellings
    2019

    Renata Ancona
    Hillside House, Burlingame
    Photograph
    2018

    Renata Ancona
    Hillside House Rendering
    3-D rendering on paper
    2017

    Anxious to Make (Liat Berdugo + Emily Martinez)
    Bitcoin Futures
    Interactive sculpture comprised of wood, electronics, LCD display, thermal printer, digital coin acceptor, paint
    2018

    Anxious to Make (Liat Berdugo + Emily Martinez)
    The Insufferable Whiteness of Being
    Single-channel video
    2018

    Anxious to Make (Liat Berdugo + Emily Martinez)
    Crypto Camouflage Keyboard
    Custom-printed wireless keyboard
    2018

    Johnna Arnold
    2014 Honda Civic #01
    Unique chromogenic print
    2018

    Johnna Arnold
    Texas Crude Resist #04
    Unique print on DuPoint Yupo
    2019

    Johnna Arnold
    1989 Toyota Land Cruiser #02
    Unique chromogenic print
    2018

    Sabiha Basrai
    No War Against Iran
    Digital print
    2019

    Hana Böttger
    Blue Purse
    Glass bead, nylon thread, leather cord, blood, sweat, but no tears
    2002

    Hana Böttger
    Bud Vase
    Glass bead, nylon thread, tiny pyrex beaker borrowed from Dept of Chemistry
    2001

    Hana Böttger
    Business Card Case
    Glass bead, nylon thread
    2019

    Frank Cole
    Lake House (A Hundred Billion)
    Acrylic on drop cloth
    2017

    Frank Cole
    Gulf House (Mother, Father, Sister, Brother)
    Acrylic on drop cloth
    2020

    Sergio De La Torre and Chris Treggiari
    This is Not a Wall, from the Sanctuary City Project
    Vinyl on wall
    2020

    Sergio De La Torre and Chris Treggiari
    I am an Immigrant, tote bag, from the Sanctuary City Project
    Tote bag
    2019

    Sergio De La Torre and Chris Treggiari
    Sanctuary Mobile Print Studio, from the Sanctuary
    City Project
    2019

    Sergio De La Torre and Chris Treggiari
    This is not a wall, from the Sanctuary
    City Project
    Screen print on newsprint
    2019

    Rachel Beth Egenhoefer
    Paper Trail
    Installation; jeans, thread, receipts
    2016

    Steve Green
    Dorothy Mort
    Screenprint; ink on paper
    2017

    Steve Green
    Minotaur, Juvenile
    Screenprint; ink on paper
    2019

    Steve Green
    Sweater #2
    Screenprint; ink on paper
    2018

    Eric Hongisto
    Selections from Fairfield Osborn Preserve
    Fuji Prints
    2019

    Carrie Hott
    Lamps That See Us
    Digital print on newsprint
    2019

    Sandra Kelch
    Atoms to Bits
    Giclee print of print-based assemblage
    2020

    Kathryn Kenworth
    Regular or Decaf
    Collage and pencil on paper
    2019

    Kathryn Kenworth
    Menswear
    Collage and pencil on paper
    2019

    Kathryn Kenworth
    Meat Sculpture
    Color screenprint on plywood
    2019

    Scott Kildall
    Rigged: Ohio 3rd
    Sculpture: wood with rope
    2019

    Scott Kildall
    Rigged: Maryland 3rd
    Sculpture: wood with rope
    2019

    Stuart McKee
    The Acts of the Apostles 2:2, in English and Choctaw
    Woodblock print on Japanese paper
    2020

    Sean Olson
    Fish with Sweaters
    Porcelain, reclaimed wool
    In Process

    Matthew Peek
    Hurricane Sandy Recovery
    3-D CAD rendering on paper
    2019

    tamara suarez porras
    constructing the moon, or mercury
    Gelatin Silver Print
    2019

    tamara suarez porras
    coronae
    Gelatin Silver Print
    2019

    tamara suarez porras
    the similarity of mercury (shown here) to the moon
    Gelatin Silver Print
    2019

    Tanu Sankalia
    Awnings, roof, sky: A view of Cuetzalan's tianguis
    Digital photograph
    2019

    Mimi Sheiner
    Rockland Pier
    Oil on board
    2019

    Mimi Sheiner
    Afternoon
    Oil on rag paper
    2019

    Mimi Sheiner
    Tenants Harbor
    Oil on rag paper
    2019

    Jessica Snow
    Space Groove 3
    2019

    Jessica Snow
    Space Groove 2
    2019

    Jessica Snow
    Space Groove 1
    2019

    Seth Wachtel
    Selections of Built work from Community Design
    Color Prints
    2006-2018

    Jenifer K Wofford
    Rupturre!! QTE
    Ink and acrylic on paper
    2019

    Jenifer K Wofford
    Rupturre!! QTZ
    Ink and acrylic on paper
    2019

    Susan Wolsborn
    Serpentine
    Collaged rifle targets
    2019

    Susan Wolsborn
    Rotation
    Rifle target, vellum
    2019

    Susan Wolsborn
    Optic
    Rifle target, vellum
    2019

  • Frank Cole
    Study for Lake House

    Stuart McKee
    Laser-cut wooden type

    Matthew Peek
    Sketch

    Sean Olson
    Model and mold for Fish with Sweaters

    Mimi Sheiner
    Sketchbooks

    Jessica Snow
    Sketchbook

    Susan Wolsborn
    Sketchbook