Symposium

In order to fulfill the Institute’s broader mission of facilitating training and research for leaders in the various disciplines of the criminal justice system, we co-host an annual symposium with the San Francisco Police Department focusing on ethical leadership strategies.

This January 7 and 8, 2016, the University of San Francisco and the San Francisco Police Department are co-hosting the twenty-first annual Law Enforcement Leadership Symposium at USF’s main campus.

The theme of this year’s event is “Black and White: A Matter of Trust” We will focus on three areas: The Historical Perspective, Best Practices, and Creating a Climate of Trust Base on Mutual Respect. 

We will also review the President's Task Force recommendations. We are currently in the process of getting some outstanding experts in the field to present at this event.

We currently have commitments from Father Edward Malloy, president emeritus of Notre Dame, Chief Greg Suhr of the San Francisco Police Department, and Chief Dave Spiller of the Pleasanton Police Department.

As we develop our agenda we will be reaching out to others, including members of the community.

As the former chief of the San Francisco Police Department and the current Institute Director, I want to extend this invitation to you and your management team.

The symposium is certified by the University, and by POST for 16 hours of Continuing Professional Training (CPT), non-reimbursable. The symposium will be held in the McLaren Conference Center. Free parking is provided. The registration fee is $400 per registrant. This includes two continental breakfasts, a luncheon, and a dinner banquet at the Holiday Inn- Golden Gate Way, San Francisco. The hotel has also set aside rooms for our participants at a reduced rate and is offering parking at a reduced rate of $30.

Please have your training managers call me at (415) 422-2884, or email ribera@usfca.edu.

We are committed to making your participation beneficial and enjoyable.

Sincerely,
Tony Ribera

Register for the January 2016 Symposium