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LLM in IP and Technology Law

The technology revolution has made intellectual property, cyberlaw, and other high tech-related issues the hottest topics at American law schools.

 

Our students in our LLM Program in Intellectual Property and Technology Law come from diverse backgrounds, for example, law and science, and many have years of experience in the science  and technology fields.   The program is open to not only those with first degrees in law or have completed in a foreign country the university-based legal education required to take the equivalent of the bar examination in that country, but also those who are qualified to practice law in a country, or the equivalent thereof or otherwise deemed sufficiently qualified as determined by our LLM Admissions Committee. Patent and Trademark Practitioners are particularly welcomed to apply for admission to our IP LLM Program.

We have an variety of courses here at the law school in the IP, Science and Technology Law field, including Antitrust and IP Rights, Copyright Law, Cyberlaw, Information Privacy Law, Intellectual Property Survey, International Intellectual Property, Patent Law, Science and the Law, and Trademark Law.

The McCarthy Institute for Intellectual Property and Technology Law at the University of San Francisco serves as the center of its intellectual Property and Technology Program, which includes a distinguished faculty, internationally-focused curriculum, innovative clinical offerings, as well as a vibrant student organization and nationally-recognized student publication.

USF's faculty and students have been involved in the IP field for decades. Professor J. Thomas McCarthy, for whom the institute is named, has served on the faculty for 35 years. An intellectual property law pioneer, McCarthy is recognized as a pre-eminent expert in the field. 

More specifically, the McCarthy Institute is the premier trademark law institute in the world. We are devoted to advancing knowledge about trademark law around the globe. We have partnered with the the heads of industry, government, legal practice and the academy, to bring forward a cutting-edge, annual symposium on trademark laws. Last year’s conference was held at Fox Entertainment in Los Angeles. We are delighted to have a special partnership with Russell Pangborn, Associate General Counsel of Microsoft Corporation as a valued partner. Microsoft has served as the primary partner and co-sponsor of each of our annual trademark symposia.   This year’s annual symposium, “Trademark Law and Its Challenges 2014”, is taking place in London, England, in March.

We invite you to read more about the McCarthy Institute at  www.usfca.edu/law/mccarthy/ and its faculty atwww.usfca.edu/law/mccarthy/faculty.

 

The program requires completion of 25 units over two consecutive full-time semesters of study at the USF School of Law (August through May). The program may also be completed through part-time study with permission of the director.

The Intellectual Property and Technology Law program provides a thorough exposure to American, international, and comparative intellectual property law. The program equips students with a sufficient grounding in legal theory and practical skills to pursue gainful employment in the intellectual property field in the United States or abroad.

To this end, students pursuing the LLM degree are required to complete the Advanced Seminar in Intellectual Property, which includes extensive research and writing components. Students must also complete a minimum of six units of IP core courses (or show that they have satisfactorily completed equivalent courses at another law school). Students may allocate no more than three credits of non-IP course work toward the degree. Students must fulfill the remainder of the required 25-units by taking approved elective courses listed in the IP curriculum.

In addition, all international LLM students who have not received a degree from a U.S. university are required to take The American Legal System courses, which meet weekly in a small class and include visits to San Francisco courtrooms and other events.