Concentration Options

 Concentration options provide a framework by which graduate students may organize their program to achieve individual goals. The following concentration options are available:

1. General Economics

Students have the option to design (in conjunction with the Graduate Advisor) their own elective course work. Some students use this option to prepare for a Ph.D. program at a highly ranked graduate Economics department. Others prepare for careers as economists in government or the private sector. Students must choose a minimum of twelve (12) graduate credits from graduate Economics offerings over and above the core courses. Other credits may be chosen from related areas such as mathematics or business administration. Additional opportunities also include directed research, a master's thesis, study abroad, internships, or a combination of the above. All students must also complete a research project in which they demonstrate mastery of economic analysis.

2. Financial Economics

This concentration option provides students with the opportunity to study domestic and international financial markets, as well as the principles for financial decisions by bankers, investment managers, and corporate financial managers. The required courses in the area are:

  • ECON - 650 Money, Banking, and Financial Institutions
  • ECON - 651 Monetary Economics

Students must choose three additional graduate Economics courses. We recommend, but do not require, that a student choose from the following:

  • ECON - 616 Special Topics in Mathematics for Economists
  • ECON - 655 Options and Futures
  • ECON - 660 Industrial Organization
  • ECON - 671 International Finance

A maximum of two of these courses may be met by M.B.A. courses when approved by the Economics Graduate Advisor. Students must also complete a research project in the field of financial economics (ECON 690).

3. International Economics

To specialize in international economics students must take the required courses:

  • ECON - 670 International Trade
  • ECON - 671 International Finance

Students must choose three additional graduate Economics courses. We recommend, but do not require, that a student choose from the following:

  • ECON - 651 Monetary Economics
  • ECON - 672 Economic Development
  • ECON - 673 Development Microeconomics
  • ECON - 674 Development Macroeconomics
  • ECON - 676 Natural Resource Economics and Development Policy
  • ECON - 677 International Political Economy

Students must also complete a research project in the field of international economics (ECON 690).

4. Telecommunications Economics and Policy

The growth of the information sector, the convergence of computers and telecommunication, and the globalization of the economy are resulting in a growing dependence on telecommunications.

The Telecommunications Economics and Policy program is designed to prepare graduates for Information Age careers in telecommunications planning, analysis, and policy. Internships, guest speakers and site visits are included in the program.

The University of San Francisco is located near the heart of some of the world's leading centers for the development of new information technologies and services. In addition, USF is located on the Pacific Rim and has strong ties with Asia and the Pacific. Students must choose (in conjunction with their faculty advisor) a minimum of five (5) courses from the following set. Please note that a minimum of 24 credits must be taken among graduate economics courses.

  • ECON - 670 International Trade
  • ECON - 674 Development Macroeconomics
  • MBA - 616 Systems in Organizations
  • MBA - 651 Telecommunications Technology and Management
  • MBA - 652 Telecommunications System Planning
  • MBA - 653 International Telecommunications
  • MBA - 654 Telecommunications Policy
  • MBA - 659 Special Topics in Telecommunications

Students must also complete an interdisciplinary research project in the area of telecommunications applications, economics, or policy:

  • ECON - 698 Directed Readings and Research
  • MBA - 698 Directed Study

In addition, students decide (in conjunction with their faculty advisor) their remaining elective course work, depending on individual interests. Students are also encouraged to seek an internship.