Submission Themes & Deadlines

Calls for Essays

Symposium: Peace, Conflict, and Justice in the time of Pandemic

Submissions Due: October 15, 2020

Under the guest editorship of Vaughn M. John, Professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice 33 (1) invites essays for a special issue on: Peace, Conflict, and Justice in the time of Pandemic. 

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented experience. The global reach of the pandemics and its multiple effects have been deep and wide. It has been a major disrupter of life, livelihoods and lifestyles. The pandemic has exposed fault lines and injustices of society, triggered and deepened conflicts, and fueled discrimination, polarization and misinformation. It has also revealed and prompted efforts of solidarity, compassion, humanization and learning. This moment in history invites reflections and analyses, from multiple perspectives, on how the COVID-19 pandemic relates to issues of peace, conflict and justice both during and after the pandemic. Essays are invited from scholars, practitioners and activists.

General themes that contributors can address in their essays include, but are not limited to, the following

  • Fault-lines of society revealed, healed and exacerbated by the pandemic
  • Conflicts prompted and deepened by the pandemic
  • Wars and ceasefires during the pandemic
  • Displaced persons and the pandemic
  • Militarization of the pandemic
  • Gender-based and family violence under lock-downs and restrictions
  • Politics and politicization of the pandemic
  • Exploitation and profiteering from disease
  • Inequality and the pandemic
  • Food security and COVID-19
  • Health justice and COVID-19
  • Environmental justice and COVID-19
  • Stigmatization of infection
  • Solidarities inspired by the pandemic
  • Citizens and community actions arising from the pandemic
  • Social movements and activism in the light of the pandemic
  • Peace Education and Peacebuilding responses to the pandemic
  • Protection, support and celebrations of front-line and emergency workers
  • Art and artists’ responses to COVID-19
  • Technology and innovation in response to COVID-19
  • Recovery and healing during and post-COVID-19
  • Spiritual connections and renewal
  • Pandemic information, news, conspiracy and false news
  • Learning from and during the pandemic
  • Struggles to teach and learn during the pandemic
  • Social connection and social distancing

Guidelines

Submissions with quality writing are sought, free of jargon, with simple titles, without embedded footnotes and endnotes. Please refer to the submission guidelines. Deadline for submissions will be October 15, 2020, with publication expected within six months of that date.

Content Questions

Expression of Interest and questions to the guest editor are welcome. Please direct content-based questions or concerns to the guest editor: Vaughn M. John: johnv@ukzn.ac.za

Submissions

Essays should be sent to Peace Review no later than 5 p.m. PST October 15, 2020.

Send Essays to: peacereview@usfca.edu to the attention of Robert Elias, Editor in Chief and Shawn Doubiago, Managing Editor:
Subject Line: Peace, Conflict, and Justice in the time of Pandemic

Symposium: Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems

Submissions Due: January 15, 2021

Under the guest editorship of Pierre Thompson, universities/colleges committee member of Pax Christi International’s Catholic Nonviolence Initiative (CNI-US), Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice 33(2) invites essays for a special issue on: Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems.

Artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics researchers have warned of “the third revolution in warfare, after gunpowder and nuclear arms” – the emergence of fully autonomous weapons that can select and engage targets without human intervention. Sometimes referred to as “killer robots”, Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (LAWS) will fundamentally change the nature of warfare and policing. Governments and civil society are intensifying the call for an international treaty to ban the development, production, and use of evolving weapons systems that lack meaningful human control over the application of deadly force. This special issue of Peace Review seeks to investigate: first, the ethical, legal, moral, operational, security, societal, and technical concerns that arise from the delegation of decision-making authority to machines with respect to the use of force; second, possible lines of approach and action to retain meaningful human control over the use of force. Essays are invited from scholars, practitioners, and activists.

General themes that contributors can address in their essays include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Terms used in the discussion of LAWS, including “autonomy” in weapons systems and “meaningful human control” over the use of force
  • Dangers of algorithmic bias, automation bias, and the “black box problem”
  • Compliance with International Humanitarian Law, including the principles of humanity, distinction, proportionality, and military necessity
  • Effect on the psychology of killing, moral injury, accountability for war crimes, and protection of human dignity during war
  • Operationalization in military doctrine, organization, and modernization efforts, such as algorithmic warfare, multi-domain command and control, and sensor-to-shooter systems
  • Applications of LAWS outside of armed conflict, such as border control and policing
  • Unintended consequences of LAWS, such as arms races, proliferation among non-state actors, lowering the threshold of war, targeted killing, and nuclear risk
  • Analysis of existing weapons systems and their contexts, providing insight into what constitutes an appropriate degree of human control
  • Arguments for and against a specific normative framework for the regulation of LAWS, such as a preemptive prohibition on fully autonomous weapons, the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons, and the Martens Clause
  • Proper role of research universities in the technical and conceptual development of AI, production of knowledge and human capital for military purposes, and promotion of ethics education for scientists
  • Efficacy of guiding principles for AI research and development, such as those proposed by Google, the Future of Life Institute, and the Pontifical Academy for Life
  • Power of the responsible tech movement, and the moral conscience of AI and robotics researchers

Guidelines

Submissions with quality writing are sought, free of jargon, with simple titles, without embedded footnotes and endnotes. Please refer to the submission guidelines. Deadline for submissions will be January 15, 2021, with publication expected within six months of that date.

Content Questions

Expression of Interest and questions to the guest editor are welcome. Please direct content-based questions or concerns to the guest editor: Pierre Thompson. For more information about the Catholic Nonviolence Initiative, contact nonviolence@paxchristi.net.

Submissions

Essays should be sent to Peace Review no later than 5 p.m. PST January 15, 2021.

Send Essays to: peacereview@usfca.edu to the attention of Robert Elias, Editor in Chief and Shawn Doubiago, Managing Editor:
Subject Line: Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems

Call for Profiles

Soliciting authors for the “Peace Profile”

Deadline: open

We are currently soliciting authors for the “Peace Profile” section of the journal, which describes the peace or human rights work of an individual or group. This journal’s Peace Profiles have a limit of 3500 words.

Contact:
Robert Elias, Editor in Chief
eliasr@usfca.edu
Shawn Doubiago, Managing Editor
peacereview@usfca.edu
Subject Line: Peace Profile

Submission Guidelines »