Recent Grants and Awards

Jesse Anttila-Hughes

Jesse Anttila-Hughes

Jesse Anttila-Hughes, Economics, College of Arts and Sciences, has received a $73,800 grant from The World Food Programme to support his collaborative project, “Study on the Economic Aftermath of Disaster.” Support from this grant will allow Dr. Anttila-Hughes and co-PI, Solomon Hsiang from UC Berkeley, to further develop their research on economic and infant mortality costs of typhoons in the Philippines. (February 22)

Danfeng Soto-Vigil Koon

Danfeng Soto-Vigil Koon, Leadership Studies, School of Education, has received a $553,000 grant from The California Endowment for a statewide school discipline learning project. This collaborative grant with researchers from UCD and UCLA aims to increase understanding of school learning environments and efforts to reduce school suspensions and expulsions that support student health and academic success across California. Findings from an in-depth comparative case study of 14 Northern California schools and 14 Southern California schools will be shared in research and professional conferences. (January 29)

Bill Ong Hing

Professor Bill Ong HingBill Ong Hing, School of Law, has been awarded additional funding of $150,000 from the California Department of Social Services to continue providing legal services to unaccompanied undocumented minors as part of USF’s Immigration Law Clinic. This will be Professor Hing’s fourth year of funding. The Refugee Programs Bureau funds nonprofit legal organizations to provide these services and USF’s Immigration Law Clinic will represent 30 unaccompanied undocumented minors in Northern California over the next year. (January 12)

Danfeng Soto-Vigil Koon

Danfeng Soto-Vigil Koon, Leadership Studies, School of Education, has received a $25,000 grant from The California Endowment for a Mini Grant. Dr. Koon will engage in a qualitative case study of a middle school in its third year of restorative justice implementation. Funding from this grant will allow Dr. Koon and her research team to conduct interviews of parents, youth, and community members. Findings of the study will then be shared with funders, organizers, and school leaders. (December 4)

Emille Lawrence

Emille Lawrence, Mathematics, College of Arts and Sciences, has received a $2,000 mini-grant from the NSF for a collaboration with the University of Nebraska to hold a “Women Do Math Mini-Symposium.” This mini-grant aims to increase and diversify the number of professional mathematicians in the U.S. by identifying and proliferating mechanisms for increasing women’s success in mathematics graduate programs, particularly women from underrepresented groups. (October 1)

Gretchen Coffman

Gretchen Coffman, Environmental Science, College of Arts and Sciences, has received a $12,500 grant from the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund to support her project, “Restoration of Critically Endangered Cypress Trees of Laos.” Support from this grant will allow Dr. Coffman to revisit an old growth site in Laos where her National Geographic expedition team previously found endangered cypress trees back in 2015. Dr. Coffman’s goals for this project are to meet with government officials to continue to help guide them with protection measures, outreach to local villages to help in endangered tree protection, and document the remainder of cut down trees. (September 18)

Danfeng Soto-Vigil Koon

Danfeng Soto-Vigil Koon, Leadership Studies, School of Education, has received a $49,130 subaward from the The California Endowment for a collaborative project with the University of California, Davis. Dr. Koon will serve as Co-Principal Investigator and Research Coordinator for Phase 3 of the learning project which aims to support developmental evaluation of efforts to reduce school suspensions and expulsions and improve student health and academic success in the Central Valley. Funding from this subaward will allow Dr. Koon to work with other PIs to determine the focus and direction of research, write and present findings to funders and partners, design research protocols, and coordinate data collection and analysis. (September 6)

Alexa Curtis

Alexa Curtis, School of Nursing and Health Professions, has received a $149,990 Song-Brown Program grant from the Office of Statewide Health Planning & Development. Funding from this grant will support 20 scholarships to students in the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) plan of study in the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program. This grant aims to increase the number of racial and ethnically diverse health professionals prepared for employment as nurse practitioners in underserved communities in California. (July 28)

Evelyn Ho

Evelyn Ho, College of Arts and Sciences, has received a $21,100 grant from the Regents of the University of California to support a partnership between UCSF and USF. Dr. Ho will work jointly with Dr. Maria Chao from UCSF as a co-PI to develop all study materials and the final study protocol to pilot test an integrative medicine approach to improve diet self-management among Chinese Americans with type 2 diabetes. Funding from this grant will support a collaborative multidisciplinary project drawing on expertise from community clinic partners and investigators in the fields of medicine, public health, Chinese medicine, and communication studies. (June 6)

Natalie Macias

Natalie Macias, Student Life, has received a $19,484 grant from the American Cancer Society’s Tobacco-Free Generation Campus Initiative (TFGCI) Grant Program supported by the CVS Health Foundation to fund the Clean Air Project. This grant aims to accelerate and expand the adoption and implementation of 100% smoke-and-tobacco-free policies on college and university campuses across the nation. (June 5)

Nell Herbert and Glori Simmons

Nell Herbert and Glori Simmons, College of Arts and Sciences, have received a $20,000 grant to support a Humanities For All Project, “Something from Nothing: Art and Handcrafted Objects from America’s Concentration Camps.” Support from this grant will assist in creating an exhibition for the Thacher Gallery which will feature over 120 objects created by incarcerated Japanese Americans during World War II. This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Visit www.calhum.org. (May 10)

Ryan West and Ramsess Quesada

Ryan West, College of Arts and Sciences, nominated undergraduate student, Ramsess Quesada, College of Arts and Sciences, for an 11-week National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in Gaithersburg, MD, for which Ramsess was chosen. This grant from NIST will cover Ramsess’ stipend, travel, and housing. (May 5)

Beste Yuksel, Alark Joshi, and Sophie J. Engle

Beste Yuksel, Alark Joshi, and Sophie J. Engle, College of Arts and Sciences, have received a $82,738 grant from the National Science Foundation to support their project entitled, “CI-P: Toward Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) that Adapt to User Cognitive State.” This grant aims to develop and test BCI’s that can provide additional information regarding able-bodied users with no additional effort on their part, resulting in adaptive interfaces that respond to cognitive state in real-time. The infrastructure will build intelligent tutoring systems in the fields of mathematics and computer science that respond to both student cognitive and affective state. (May 3)

Genevieve Leung

Genevieve Leung, Rhetoric and Language, has received a $32,000 grant from the Fulbright Taiwan, Foundation for Scholarly Exchange, to support a one-year fellowship opportunity serving as an academic advisor of the Fulbright English Teaching Assistants program. Funding from Fulbright Taiwan will allow Dr. Leung to contribute to and enhance the English teaching environment in Taiwan by co-teaching with local English teachers in elementary and junior high schools, in addition to enhancing her own research and teaching experiences. (March 17)

Michael Rozendal

Michael Rozendal, Dual Degree in Teacher Preparation Program, has received a $249,899 grant from the Commission on Teacher Credentialing to implement a new four-year integrated teaching program in partnership with City College of San Francisco. This grant aims to develop an enhanced teacher pipeline between the two institutions which will allow students the opportunity to streamline the time needed to earn a bachelor’s and California teaching credential and help provide additional qualified teachers for California public schools. The new four-year integrated teaching program will be housed within the Undergraduate Teacher Education Center, as an extension of a 20-year collaboration between the College of Arts and Sciences and the graduate School of Education to prepare high-quality teachers committed to excellent urban education in high-needs areas. (March 14)

Bill Bosl

Bill Bosl, School of Nursing, has received a $23,708 subaward from the New Jersey Department of Health, to support a collaborative project with Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Dr. Bosl will serve as a co-principal investigator along with Barbie Zimmerman-Bier from Rutgers University. Funding from this grant will support a pilot project which investigates the use of very early markers to identify children with Autism among premature and low birth-weight children. This project aims to develop a screening tool that can predict which children are at risk for development of Autism Spectrum Disorders, which will lead to earlier interventions and improved outcomes. (January 1)