Ethnic Minority Dissertation Fellowship

Each academic year the Provost’s Office, under the leadership of the Office of Diversity Engagement and Community Outreach, invites scholars from underrepresented ethnic minorities to apply for the USF Ethnic Minority Dissertation Fellowship. In this program, scholars are expected to complete their dissertation on a diversity related research topic, while teaching one course per semester in the school where they are placed. Through this program, promising scholars from diverse backgrounds become familiar with the responsibilities of a USF faculty member.  

History of The Program

The Ethnic Minority Dissertation Fellowship began in 1993 with major grant funding from the James Irvine Foundation. Dr. Gerardo Marin, currently Vice Provost of Academic Affairs, was the principal architect of this initial fellowship program at USF. Funding from the Irvine grant ended in 2010. Since that time, the Provost's Office has funded this fellowship due to its highly successful record of recruiting and retaining talented ethnic minority scholars from across the country.

This academic year marks the 20th anniversary of the Ethnic Minority Dissertation Fellowship (EMDF) program at USF, previously called the Irvine Fellows. Thanks to the support of the Provost’s Office and the Dean’s Office in the College of Arts and Sciences, this year USF has welcomed two EMDF scholars onto our faculty: Marian Liu and James Zarsadiaz. 

 Many of USF’s celebrated professors began their careers at the university through this fellowship, and the university currently has 13 faculty members that are Irvine Fellows. In the words of Professor Kevin Chun, (Fellow '95-96): “This program was essential because it contributed to a critical mass of ethnic minority faculty on campus, which helped to reshape and strengthen USF's curriculum and intellectual life. Many of the Fellows eventually became the first members of their ethnic groups to become full-time, tenured professors in their academic departments. Fellows brought innovative research programs to USF and developed pioneering academic courses that directly speak to and serve San Francisco's diverse communities, thus raising USF's profile both locally and nationally. This fellowship continues to represent the heart and soul of USF's mission to distinguish itself as a diverse, socially responsible learning community of high quality scholarship and academic rigor sustained by a faith that does justice."

Fellows

Year Name
2013-2014 Marian Liu
  James Zarsadiaz
2012-2013 Ruth Kim
2011-2012 Valerie Francisco
2008-2009 EMD Fellow
  Decoteau Irby
  Quayshawn Spencer
2007-2008 Violet Cheung
  Kouslaa Kessler-Mata
  Wanjiru Kamau-Rutenberg
2006-2007 Melissa Moreno
2005-2006 Jorge Aquino
  Christina Grijalva
2004 - 2005 Victor Rios
  Evelyn I. Rodriguez
  Shawan Worsely
Year Name
2003-2004 Gena Chandler
2002-2003 Stephanie Sears
1999-2000 Ange-Marie Hancock
  Rachel Gortarez Salas
1998-1999 Eileen Fung
  Rod Hernandez
  David Kim
  Julio Moreno
1997-1998 Rebecca Chiyoko King-O'Riain
1995-1996 Kevin Chun
1994-1995 Eduardo Mendieta
1993-1994 Paul Lopez

2013 − 2014 Fellows: Marian Liu & James Zarsadiaz

Marian LiuMarian Liu

Marian Liu's Curriculum Vitae
Marian Liu's Dissertation Summary


James ZarsadiazJames Zarsadiaz

James Zarsadiaz's Curriculum Vitae
James Zarsadiaz's Dissertation Summary


2012 - 2013 Fellow: Ruth Kim

/uploadedImages/Destinations/Offices_and_Services/Provost/Diversity/images/ruth kim_web.jpgRuth Kim

Ruth Kim's Curriculum Vitae
Ruth Kim's Dissertation Summary


2011 - 2012 Fellow: Valerie Francisco

/uploadedImages/Destinations/Offices_and_Services/Provost/Diversity/images/Valerie Francisco_web.jpgValerie Francisco

Assistant Professor, Sociology
College of Arts and Sciences, University of Portland

Valerie Francisco's Curriculum Vitae
Valerie Francisco's Dissertation Summary


2008 − 2009 Fellows: EMD Fellow, Decoteau Irby, & Quayshawn Spencer

nophotoEMD Fellow

Assistant Professor, Theology and Religious Studies
College of Arts and Sciences, University of San Francisco




nophotoDecoteau Irby

Assistant Professor, Department of Administrative Leadership
School of Education, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

 

 

 

/uploadedImages/Destinations/Offices_and_Services/Provost/Diversity/images/quayshawn.jpgQuayshawn Spencer

Assistant Professor, Philosophy
College of Arts & Sciences, University of San Francisco

Professor Spencer's Website

"USF's Ethnic Minority Dissertation Fellowship was integral to my development as a young scholar. It gave me my first job teaching a college course. The fellowship also helped me push my dissertation writing forward by structuring my time better (due to teaching demands) and giving me access to academics who were specialists in my area of research. Specifically, my dissertation was in the philosophy of race, and USF has more philosophers of race than any other university on the West coast. The fellowship also introduced me to the benefits and responsibilities of an academic, and solidified my desire to become a college professor. This fellowship is valuable to USF because there is no better way to achieve faculty diversity than to actively seek it out through an institutionalized recruitment program like USF's Ethnic Minority Dissertation Fellowship."

2007 - 2008 Fellow: Violet Cheung, Kouslaa Kessler-Mata, & Wanjiru Kamau-Rutenberg

/uploadedImages/Destinations/Offices_and_Services/Provost/Diversity/images/violet cheung.jpgViolet Cheung

Assistant Professor, Psychology
College of Arts & Sciences, University of San Francisco

"The year that I spent in the dissertation scholar program prompted a significant shift in my professional life. Not only did I complete the transition from student to teacher, but I also realized that pure research could be wielded to solve real world problems. Though my formal academic training took place at a research university where applied research is seen as less prestigious than basic research, nevertheless, USF’s values of social justice, equality and common good inspired an interest in applying emotion theories to study inter-group aggression. My research on the public’s support for war in the aftermath of 9/11 flourished during my tenure as a dissertation scholar. In addition, my current research on the emotional underpinnings of cyber policies is a continuation of this work, of using theory to address real world problems. To me, the dissertation scholarship is a chance for USF to showcase its thriving academic community and for candidates to immerse themselves in a unique and stimulating environment.

nophotoKouslaa Kessler-Mata

More information to come

 

 

 

/uploadedImages/Destinations/Offices_and_Services/Provost/Diversity/images/Wanjiru.jpgWanjiru Kamau-Rutenberg

Assistant Professor, African Studies
College of Arts & Sciences, University of San Francisco

Professor Kamau-Rutenberg serves as the Director of Akili Dada

"The Ethnic Minority Dissertation Fellow made it possible for me to finish my dissertation and become an academic. USF believed in me and my abilities and provided me with all I needed to succeed."

2006 - 2007 Fellow: Melissa Moreno

nophotoMelissa Moreno

More information to come 


2005 − 2006 Fellow: Jorge Aquino & Christina Grijalva

nophotoJorge Aquino

Assistant Professor, Latin American Studies
Assistant Professor Theology and Religious Studies

College of Arts and Sciences, University of San Francisco



nophotoChristina Grijalva

More information to come


2004 - 2005 Fellow: Victor Rios, Evelyn I. Rodriguez, & Shawan Worsely

Victor RiosVictor Rios

Associate Professor, Sociology

College of Letters and Science, University of California, Santa Barbara

Dr. Victor Rios website



/uploadedImages/Destinations/Offices_and_Services/Provost/Diversity/images/RodriguezEvelyn_web.jpgEvelyn I. Rodriguez

Associate Professor, Sociology
College of Arts & Sciences, University of San Francisco

Professor Rodriguez serves as Co-President of Asian Women United

Rodriguez's book Coming of Age, is forthcoming from Temple University Press

"I think that the most important thing that being an Irvine Fellow enabled me to do was benefit from the wise and generous mentorship of senior faculty of color who truly understood my commitment (and the challenges) to developing research, teaching, and service that not only enriched my academic field but that contributed to empowering a next generation of informed and compassionate scholar-citizens in and out of the university. I am confident that the experience it gave me in the classroom and building relationships with my department helped make me a more qualified and competitive candidate for the nationally-posted position I was eventually hired for (at usf) while i was still abroad. While I've been at USF, I have personally witnessed the concrete ways the Irvine Fellowship has enriched our campus community. Our Irvines have been USF's workhorses: they helped establish African American Studies and Chican@/Latin@ Studies; they are serving as program directors, student and organization advisors, and in the Dean's office; and they are creating and maintaining vital partnerships between USF and community groups across San Francisco and beyond. The work of our Irvines has and continues to insure that USF walks the walk--and doesn't just talk the talk--when it comes to real diversity, and real community connections.
nophotoShawan Worsely

More information to come






2003 − 2004 Fellow: Gena Chandler

nophotoGena Chandler

More information to come




2002 - 2003 Fellow: Stephanie Sears

Professor Stephanie SearsStephanie Sears

Director of African American Studies, University of San Francisco
Director of Esther Madriz Diversity Scholars Living Learning Community

Author of Imagining Black Womanhood (SUNY, 2010)


1999 − 2000 Fellows: Ange-Marie Hancock & Rachel Gortarez Salas

Ange-Marie HancockAnge-Marie Hancock

Associate Professor, Political Science and Gender Studies

College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences, University of Southern California

More information



nophotoRachel Gortarez Salas

More information to come


1998 − 1999 Fellows: Eileen Fung, Rod Hernandez, David Kim, & Julio Moreno

nophotoEileen Fung

Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Academic Director, Master of Fine Arts in Writing Program
College of Arts and Sciences, University of San Francisco




nophotoRod Hernandez

Associate Professor, English
English Deparment, California State University, Dominguez Hills




nophotoDavid Kim

Associate Professor, Philosophy 
College of Arts and Sciences, University of San Francisco




nophotoJulio Moreno

Associate Professor, History

College of Arts and Sciences, University of San Francisco

 

 

 

1997 − 1998 Fellow: Rebecca Chiyoko King-O'Riain

Dr. Rebecca Chiyoko King-O'RiainDr. Rebecca Chiyoko King-O'Riain

Senior Lecturer, Sociology
Social Sciences, National University of Ireland, Maynooth
"The Irvine Scholarship (now the Ethnic Minority Dissertation Fellowship) changed my life and launched my international career as a scholar. When I arrived at USF from UC Berkeley, I was one of the first Irvine Scholars and was fortunate to arrive just after Dr. Kevin Chun (Psychology) and just prior to Dr. Eileen Fung (English). Together, we formed a critical mass of scholars in Asian American Studies and this allowed us to formulate new and diversify existing curricula at USF. Intellectually, the rich, engaging, and personable community at USF (I now realize, a fine and rare combination!), provided me with the support to complete my PhD and write my first book 'Pure Beauty: Judging Race in Japanese American Beauty Pageants.' When I left USF, to pursue a career in Europe, I was well prepared to meet what I see as the global challenge of social justice both in San Francisco and the world at large. All of this, would not have been possible without the scholarship at USF."

1995 − 1996 Fellow: Kevin Chun

Kevin ChunKevin Chun

Professor, Psychology
College of Arts and Sciences, University of San Francisco

“This program was essential because it contributed to a critical mass of ethnic minority faculty on campus, which helped to reshape and strengthen USF's curriculum and intellectual life. Many of the Fellows eventually became the first members of their ethnic groups to become full-time, tenured professors in their academic departments. Fellows brought innovative research programs to USF and developed pioneering academic courses that directly speak to and serve San Francisco's diverse communities, thus raising USF's profile both locally and nationally. This fellowship continues to represent the heart and soul of USF's mission to distinguish itself as a diverse, socially responsible learning community of high quality scholarship and academic rigor sustained by a faith that does justice."

1994 − 1995 Fellow: Eduardo Mendieta

nophotoEduardo Mendieta

Professor, Philosophy
Department of Philosophy, Stony Brook University

 


1993 − 1994 Fellow: Paul Lopez

nophotoPaul Lopez

More information to come