The University of San Francisco: Center for Global Education
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USF students crossing Turk Street from Lomo

Immersion Programs

 

SUMMER 2014 COURSES

Professor Contact Information Course

Gerard Kuperus 

  gkuperus@usfca.edu

Culture and Environment in Sitka, Alaska

(July 23 to August 8)

Tsering Wangchuk 

 twangchuk@usfca.edu 

Exploring the Buddhist Himalaya in India

(May 20 – June 11)

Regina Otero-Sabogal regina.otero.sabogal@ucsf.edu Cuba Immersion: Understanding Health Care
(May 19 - June 1)

Natalie Greene

 nataliedancer@hotmail.com 

Dance at School in Tacna, Peru

(May 31st - June 14th)

Joaquin Jay Gonzales

 gonzalez@usfca.edu

Philippines Today

(July 18 – Aug 4)

 

Joaquin Jay Gonzales  gonzalez@usfca.edu China today
(May 18 - 31)
Tom Godfrey S.J.  tgodfrey@usfca.edu  Health Care in the Central Valley (Nursing & MPH students)

Laureen Turner

 lturner@usfca.edu

Puebla, Mexico (School of Nursing)

(May 31 - June 28)

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

Culture and Environment in Sitka, Alaska

Gerard Kuperus gkuperus@usfca.edu

 (July 23 to August 8)

This course examines the relationship between culture and the

environment in the unique island setting of Sitka, Alaska. The course will contrast and compare "Native American" and "Western" philosophies of nature. We will immerse ourselves in these philosophies by studying the area's terrestrial and marine environments and by specifically focusing on some of the controversies surrounding the use of natural resources by the Tlingit tribe and the non-Native residents of Sitka.

Exploring the Buddhist Himalaya in India

Tsering Wangchuk <twangchuk@usfca.edu>

(May 20 – June 11)

This 3-week study abroad course with 12-hour pre-departure class meetings will explore the history, culture, and religion of Tibetan refugees in Dharamsala, India through reading materials, reciprocal service-learning opportunities at monastic and non-monastic institutions, lectures by local specialists and activists, conversations with Buddhist monastics and hermits about their beliefs and practices, observing cultural and religious festivities, and visiting sacred and historical sites. Through these learning resources, students will learn how Tibetan Buddhist culture continues to shape the lives of this largely immigrant community, and how individuals in turn give new meanings to their religion and culture in an era of globalization. 

Dance at School in Tacna, Peru

Natalie Greene <nataliedancer@hotmail.com>

(May 31st - June 14th)

Working closely with classroom teachers, the USF team creates a series of movement classes for 1st to 6th grades, addressing the curriculum units that each class is studying. In addition, after-school rehearsals are held daily to prepare for an end of session performance. This performance provides a culminating experience and an opportunity to celebrate the creative contribution and personal growth of everyone involved. This course emphasizes that movement and creativity creates new levels of understanding amongst people of different backgrounds and cultures

Puebla, Mexico (School of Nursing)

(May 31 – June 28th ,2014)

Laureen Turner lturner@usfca.edu

Through immersing themselves into the culture of Mexico with a focus on language, culture, and health care systems, students will gain a rich understanding of the culture, disparities, and mechanisms for change.  The terminal outcome for this course is designed to develop nurses who can better understand the culture of the Mexican people in order to provide culturally competent care.  Additionally, through exploration of health care systems in public, private, community, and rural sectors, students will discover disparities in health care systems and determine how they relate. 

Cuba Immersion: Understanding Health Care

(May 19th - June 1nd, 2014)

Prof. Meera Nosek, mnosek@usfca.edu

Otero-Sabogal, Regina" <Regina.Otero-Sabogal@ucsf.edu>

This 2 unit elective includes lessons in Spanish & Medical Spanish, visits to clinics and community health centers, and cultural events in Havana Cuba. Come learn about local health conditions as well as how Cuba has developed an impressive public health system making great advances despite economic hardships.

China Today

(May 18th – 31st, 2014)

Joaquin Jay Gonzales gonzalez@usfca.edu

China Today: Arrupe Immersion is a service learning and cultural diversity summer immersion class in China. An overriding thematic assumption is that: learning and experiencing China is a must, not an option to contemporary international studies. China is the second largest economy in the world. Comprising one-fifth of humanity, the Chinese have emerged as both sought after producers and consumers. China has become an influential superpower, not just in Asia but in every corner of the world. During China Today, you will experience China’s complex culture, economy, politics, and society firsthand.

Philippines Today Arrupe

July 21-Aug 3, 2014

Joaquin Jay Gonzales gonzalez@usfca.edu

This is an intensive service learning and cultural diversity justice immersion class on the Philippines. During Philippines Today, you will experience the Philippines’ rich and complex environment, culture, economy, politics, and society firsthand. An overriding theme for the service learning immersion is the Philippines rural and urban environment, particularly in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, and the social justice work that still needs to be done.

Health Care in the Central Valley, CA.

Tim Godfrey tgodfrey@usfca.edu

This Central Valley Immersion is a 2 credits course open to nurses and Public Health students that during 2 weeks would travel to some of the cities in the Central Valley, become immersed in the lives of migrants, visit public health sites and programs sponsored by Save the Children.

 

 

Intersession 2014 courses

Professor Contact Information Topic
Abrol Fairweather fairweather@usfca.edu Injustice, Healing, and the Blues
Erin Brigham embrinham@usfca.edu
(415)422-2912
Women, Poverty, and Catholic Social Thought
Paul Flores pflo55@yahoo.com
(415)422-5255
Latino Gangs in San Francisco

Danijela Pavlic dpavlic@usfca.edu South Korea Immersion (Nursing)


DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Injustice, Healing and The Blues
This course analyzes the dynamics of the social, economic and political marginalization that gave birth to Blues and to examine how marginalized groups overcome injustice through cultural engagement. The class connects with the Bay Area Blues Society and interviews classic blues musicians in West Oakland, CA. 
Faculty: Abrol Fairweather, Philosophy Department 

Women, Poverty, and Catholic Social Thought
January 2 - 18, 2013
Contemporary Catholic Social Thought insists that social justice demands a preferential option for the poor and vulnerable of society. On local and global levels, women are disproportionately impacted by poverty. Grounded in the Ignatian model of community engagement, this Arrupe Justice Immersion Course will challenge students to observe and analyze women's experiences of poverty in the San Francisco Tenderloin community; reflect upon this reality using texts from Catholic Social Thought along with feminist theology/ethics; and respond with informed action for the promotion of social justice, working alongside the Faithful Fools Street ministry. 

Adj. Prof. Erin Brigham  

Latino Gangs in Oakland and SF
This course engages USF students in local, marginalized community issues in Oakland & San Francisco, CA. Partnering with CARECEN & Unity Council in Fruitvale, students develop relationships with youth and professionals that allow them to see the world from a different perspective. 

Adj. Prof. Paul Flores


 Summer 2013 Courses  

Professor Contact Information Topic

Gaelle Corvaisier

corvaisier@usfca.edu

Urban Marginality in Paris, France

Timothy Godfrey

tgodfrey@usfca.edu
(415)422-6792

Health Care in the Central Valley (Nursing & MPH students)
Sharon Gmelch sbgmelch@usfca.edu
(415)422-4453
Culture, the Environment and Tourism in Sitka, Alaska
Jay Gonzalez gonzalez@usfca.edu
(415)422-5483
China Today (**ALREADY FULL)
Natalie Greene nataliedancer@hotmail.com Minds in Motion in Tacna, Peru
Susan Katz katz@usfca.edu
(415)422-2209
English Minga in the Ecuadorian Amazon (**ALREADY FULL)

Pedro Lange-Churion langechurion@usfca.edu
(415)422-6135
Urban Spaces & Plural Identities in Bogota, Colombia
Aaron Hahn Tapper ajhahntapper@usfca.edu
(415)422.2378
Beyond Bridges: Israel-Palestine
Roberto Varea varea@usfca.edu
(415)422-2071
CELASA/Puebla Seminar
(**ALREADY FULL)
Meera Nosek mnosek@usfca.edu
(415)422.2019
Cuba Immersion: Understanding Health Care (**ALREADY FULL)

Please contact each professor for more information or fill up your information using the "Students Sign Up" tab. If you are interested in more than one course, please email Kique Bazan at lebazan@usfca.edu

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Urban Marginality In Paris, France

May 20th - May 31st , 2013

This course explores urban marginality in Paris, France and its suburbs (Banlieues). We examine a variety of topics, from French colonial History to current immigration trend(s), ethnic statistics policy and unemployment in order to frame a larger discussion on diversity, poverty and exclusion in France. Through participation in social activities with underprivileged youth and discussions with social workers, students explore social and cultural inequalities affecting disintegrated communities and efforts to change the status quo from within. Concurrent exploration of French culture (museums, etc.), business etiquette, and survival French will allow for cultural comparisons in such a way as to broaden a reflection on diversity and treatment of minorities, two key elements of an European identity still in the making.

Prof. Gaelle L Corvaisier, corvaisier@usfca.edu

Health Care in the Central Valley, CA.

This Central Valley Immersion is a 2 credits course open to nurses and Public Health students that during 2 weeks would travel to some of the cities in the Central Valley, become immersed in the lives of migrants, visit public health sites and programs sponsored by Save the Children.

Tim Godfrey, tgodfrey@usfca.edu 

Culture, the Environment and Tourism (Sitka, Alaska)

July 26th- August 13th, 2013

This course examines the relationship between culture and the environment in the unique island setting of Sitka, Alaska. You will not only learn about the area's terrestrial and marine environments and how Tlingit and non-Native residents of Sitka use its natural resources, but also about local controversies surrounding the stewardship of the region's natural resources - its fish and other marine life, timber, and scenic beauty. The latter includes considering the social and environmental impact of different forms of tourism.

Sharon Gmelch, sbgmelch@usfca.edu

China Today

May 21st - June 1st, 2013

This cultural diversity immersion class explores Beijing - the heart and soul of China - to understand its current influence in the world. We experience China's complex culture, economy, politics, business, and society.

Prof. Jay Gonzalez, gonzalez@usfca.edu

Dance at School in Tacna, Peru

May 31st - June 14th, 2013

Working closely with classroom teachers, the USF team creates a series of movement classes for 1st to 6th grades, addressing the curriculum units that each class is studying. In addition, after-school rehearsals are held daily to prepare for an end of session performance. This performance provides a culminating experience and an opportunity to celebrate the creative contribution and personal growth of everyone involved. This course emphasizes that movement and creativity creates new levels of understanding amongst people of different backgrounds and cultures.

Adj. Prof. Natalie Greene, nataliedancer@hotmail.com

English Minga in the Ecuadorian Amazon

July 6-27, 2013

This graduate course is designed to become immersed in Achuar way of living and to work with Achuar teachers to develop an Achuar-centric English language curriculum, helping them attain their goal of self-sufficiency.

Prof. Susan Katz, katz@usfca.edu

Urban Spaces & Plural Identities in Bogota, Colombia


May 27st - June 21st, 2013

A Latin American city with all the contrast, vitality inherent to this region of the world, Bogota will prove to a thought-provoking and unforgettable immersion, and it will introduce you to a Latin American megalopolis We will also travel to San Andres and Providencia to be part of an international workshop whose main objective is to understand this region’s developing urban culture and to offer sustainable solutions to the challenges it faces. Your final project will be an exhibit in a city gallery where you will show visual work on topics raised by the immersion, in one of the following mediums: photography, video, architectural drawing and design

SPANISH NOT REQUIRED to enroll in this summer program. Classes and reading material will be in English, and students will have access to translation when needed. LIMITED SPACES !

Pedro Lange-Churion, langechurion@usfca.edu 

Beyond Bridges: Israel-Palestine 

May 20 June 10, 2013
This course is designed for students interested in social justice activism and international conflict. Students will meet with members of marginalized communities in Israel and Palestine, analyzing and reflecting upon root causes of societal forms of oppression. This course aims to de-exceptionalize this ostensibly exceptional conflict, empowering students to understand and embrace ways to transform the unjust patterns present in Israel, Palestine, and beyond. For more information, including costs, please refer to http://www.centerfortransformativeeducation.org/beyond-bridges-israel-palestine-s.html.

Professor Huda Abu Arqoub

Cuba Immersion: Understanding Health Care

May 18th - June 2nd, 2013

This 2 unit elective includes lessons in Spanish & Medical Spanish, visits to clinics and community health centers, and cultural events in Havana Cuba. Come learn about local health conditions as well as how Cuba has developed an impressive public health system making great advances despite economic hardships.

Prof. Meera Nosek, mnosek@usfca.edu

Sitka, Alaska

PAST ARRUPE COURSES

Intersession 2013   

Professor Contact Information Topic
Luis E. Bazan lebazan@usfca.edu
(415)422-2708
Central Valley Immersion
(Immersion in South Central Valley)
Erin Brigham asdowling@usfca.edu 
(415)422-2912
Women, Poverty, and Catholic Social Thought
Aaron Tapper ajhahntapper@usfca.edu
(415)422-2378
Beyond Bridges: Israel/Palestine
(International Immersion)
Mary Jane Niles /
Frank Buckley S.J.
niles@usfca.edu
(415)422-2354
Public Health and Homelessness
(Immersion in the SF Tenderloin) 
Brad Washington washingtonb@usfca.edu
(415)422-5163
Alliances with Newcomer Youth (for International Students) 
Paul Flores pflo55@yahoo.com
(415)422-5255
Latino Gangs in San Francisco


INTERSESSION 2013 

Central Valley Immersion 
January 7 – 12, 2013
The Central Valley Immersion is designed for students interested in learning from grassroots leaders in Bakersfield, Fresno, Modesto, Delano, and Merced woking with the Latino and Mohng communities. This class explores the pressing social issues connected to migration, and the innovation and leadership skills that have merged from the community based organizations for social transformation. Students should contact professor regarding program cost (room, board, transportation). 
Adj. Prof. Luis E. Bazan

Women, Poverty, and Catholic Social Thought
January 2 - 18, 2013
Contemporary Catholic Social Thought insists that social justice demands a preferential option for the poor and vulnerable of society. On local and global levels, women are disproportionately impacted by poverty. Grounded in the Ignatian model of community engagement, this Arrupe Justice Immersion Course will challenge students to observe and analyze women's experiences of poverty in the San Francisco Tenderloin community; reflect upon this reality using texts from Catholic Social Thought along with feminist theology/ethics; and respond with informed action for the promotion of social justice, working alongside the Faithful Fools Street ministry. 
Adj. Prof. Erin Brigham  

Public Health and Homelessness (Immersion in the Tenderloin)
January 11- 18, 2013
The objectives of this immersion and Service-Learning course are to understand, witness, and reflect upon the state of health care among the poor and marginalized of the city, with a focus on the experience of the individual person with respect to discrimination, addiction, violence, access to health care, health education, and physical and mental health problems stemming from poverty (and vice versa). These issues will be addressed in the context of an historical perspective of urban poverty. The service component of the course includes outreach, exploration, and volunteering at a range of health and housing service sites in San Francisco.
Prof. Mary Jane Niles / Frank Buckley S.J. 

Beyond Borders: Israel-Palestine (International Immersion)
January 2 - 16, 2013
This course is designed for students interested in social justice activism and international conflict. Students will intern with a Jerusalem-based NGO working to support marginalized communities in Israel and Palestine, in addition to analyzing and reflecting upon root causes of societal forms of oppression. This course aims to de-exceptionalize this ostensibly exceptional conflict, empowering students to understand and embrace ways to transform the oppressive patterns present in Israel, Palestine, and beyond. Students should contact professor regarding program cost (room, board, transportation).
Prof. Aaron J Hahn Tapper

Alliances with Newcomer Youth (For ESL Students)
January 2 – 18, 2013
The objective of this course is to align USF students with newcomer and immigrant youth enrolled in the San Francisco Unified School District. Partnering with the Telegraph Hill Neighborhood Center (Tel-Hi), this course will introduce students to the history of youth mentorship and leadership initiatives for immigrant youth in San Francisco, as well as pedagogical approaches towards being an effective mentor. Students will develop relationships with youth as well as Tel-Hi professionals to enhance their understandings of social justice and community service.
Adj. Prof. Brad Washington

Latino Gangs in Oakland and SF
This course engages USF students in local, marginalized community issues in Oakland & San Francisco, CA. Partnering with CARECEN & Unity Council in Fruitvale, students develop relationships with youth and professionals that allow them to see the world from a different perspective. 

Adj. Prof. Paul Flores


Summer 2012 Courses

Professor Contact Information Topic
Luis E. Bazan lebazan@usfca.edu Ignatian Education Seminar in Peru
Amie Dowling asdowling@usfca.edu
(415)422-4888
Students in Arts and Incarceration
Sharon Gmelch sbgmelch@usfca.edu Culture, the Environment and Tourism, Alaska
Natalie Greene nataliedancer@hotmail.com Minds in Motion: movement as a tool for curriculum development
Karina Hodoyan

kahodoyan@usfca.edu 

Latina Activism: Gender and Immigration in San Francisco

Susan Katz katz@usfca.edu English Minga in the Ecuadorian Rainforest 
Center for Global Education studyabroad@usfca.edu Binational Course: Border Issues Seminar in Tijuana

SUMMER 2012 

Ignatian Education Seminar in Peru
June 3 – 17, 2012
The Ignatian Education Seminar is designed for students interested in studying the Jesuit commitment for social justice in Lima, Peru. This class explores the pressing social issues to the most marginalized, learns from the people working on the frontlines, and connects with local students leaders working for justice.
Adj. Prof. Luis E. Bazan

Students in Arts and Incarceration
June 25th-July 13th
The Arts and Incarceration is designed for students who are interested in merging social activism, performance and teaching. Students will learn how to use the arts (theater/movement/ music/writing) to address critical social and cultural issues by creating a dialogue between incarcerated people and their communities. Through discussion, hands on exercises, readings and video, students will gain skills in, and a context for, a creative pedagological activist process that is rooted in community-based arts.
Prof. Amie Dowling

Culture, the Environment and Tourism: Sitka, Alaska
July 13-30, 2012
This 17-day, 4-credit Arrupe Social Justice Immersion course in anthropology (ANTH 280) and environmental studies (ENVA 280) examines the relationship between culture and the environment in the unique island setting of Sitka, Alaska. You will not only learn about the area’s terrestrial and marine environments and how Tlingit and non-Native residents of Sitka use its natural resources, but also about local controversies surrounding the stewardship of the region’s natural resources – its fish and other marine life, timber, and scenic beauty. The latter includes considering the social and environmental impact of different forms of tourism.
Prof. Sharon Gmelch

Minds in Motion: movement as a tool for curriculum development: Tacna, Peru
June 1-15, 2012
The USF Dance Program works with children at Colegio Miguel Pro in Tacna, Peru, with a focus on teaching academic curriculum through movement. Working closely with classroom teachers, the USF team creates a series of movement classes for 1st to 6th grades, addressing the curriculum units that each class is studying. Class material ranges from multiplication to geometry, history to poetry, body systems to earth habitats. In addition, after-school rehearsals are held daily to prepare for an end of session performance. This performance provides a culminating experience and an opportunity to celebrate the creative contribution and personal growth of everyone involved. The Minds in Motion course in Tacna, Peru, emphasizes that movement and creativity can be powerful tools in deconstructing economic and cultural barriers, creating new levels of understanding amongst people of different backgrounds and cultures.
Adj. Prof. Natalie Greene

Latina Activism: Gender and Immigration in San Francisco
July 17 – 28, 2012
The course will study the roots and present day context of Latina immigration in San Francisco and the US. This will be accomplished by examining the history of immigration withing the framework of community activism, cultural citizenship and the plight of Spanish-speaking women immigrants in this city. We will workshop with artists and activists, as well as do service work with two organizations who support women immigrants. Our final goal will be to strategize a tool for social action based on the collaboration with and specific needs of this community.
Prof. Karina Hodoyan

English Minga in the Ecuadorian Amazon
July 7-28, 2012
This graduate course is designed to become immersed in Achuar way of living and to work with Achuar teachers to develop an Achuar-centric English language curriculum, helping them attain their goal of self-sufficiency.
Prof. Susana Katz

Border Issues Seminar in Tijuana
This is a bi-national course that combines academic experiences with community based learning in the Jesuit tradition among Latino immigrants to the US. The course includes college students from Mexico and from US Jesuit universities. (In cooperation with Universidad Iberamericana Tijuana)

 

Intersession 2012 Courses

Professor Contact Information Topic
Paul Flores pflo55@yahoo.com Latino Gangs in Oakland and SF
Erin Bringham

embrigham@usfca.edu
(415) 422-2912
Catholic Social Thought: Women, Poverty and the Preferential Option for the Poor
Lilian Dube

ldube@usfca.edu Zambia Today 
(Theology)
Abrol Fairweather


abrol@me.com
Injustice, Healing and The Blues 
(Philosophy)
Mary Niles

niles@usfca.edu

5th Street Clinic, a primary care facility based in the South of Market Multiservice Center in San Francisco, serving transiently housed and homeless men and women.

INTERSESSION COURSES

Latino Gangs in Oakland and SF
Objective: Engages USF students in local, marginalized community issues
Area: Oakland & San Francisco, CA 
Organization: CARECEN & Unity Council in Fruitvale

Faculty: Paul Flores, Performing Arts and Social Justice

Catholic Social Thought: Women, Migration and the Preferential Option for the Poor and Vulnerable 
Objectives: The experiences of women migrants: how gender intersects with social justice issues (poverty, immigration) from the perspective of Catholic social teaching.
Area: Tenderloin, San Francisco (2 – 4 weeks)
Organization: Faithful Fools Street Ministry
Faculty: Erin Brigham, Lane Center For Catholic Social Thought; Theology and Religious Studies

Zambia Today 
Objective: explore the strength of a community pulling together (ubuntu) to get beyond the AIDS impasse.
Area: Zambia
Faculty: Lilian Dube, Theology and Religious Studies

Injustice, Healing and The Blues
Objective: To analyze the dynamics of the social, economic and political marginalization that gave birth to Blues and to examine how marginalized groups overcome injustice through cultural engagement.
Area: Hunter’s Point & West Oakland, CA.
Organization: Bay Area Blues Society
Faculty: Abrol Fairweather, Philosophy Department 

Serving Transiently Housed and Homeless Men and Women.
Objective: To work with the underserved in San Francisco, to witness and reflect upon this experience and their interactions with people who are in difficult, if not dire, straits, and to explore the factors that contribute to marginalization.
Area: San Francisco, CA
Organization: St. Vincent de Paul - Multiservice Center
Faculty: Mary Niles, School of Nursing