Bollywood Nation
August 26, 2014
5 - 6:30 p.m.
McLaren Conference Center 250 
more info »
Bridging the Pacific bridge and city at night
Ship and skyline
Entering a Japanese temple through round door
riverfront market
Japanese temple on the water
chinese market
Shanghai skyline
Korean women in bright dresses
boat vendors
Airport sign with destinations

Wednesday, December 1, 2010 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter off Parker at Golden Gate Avenue

Sharon Stone: Actor and Activist

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2010 12-1A fashion model, a film star, a fine humanitarian, these qualities represent Sharon Stone at her best. Active in the fight against malaria in Africa and AIDS globally, she has also fought for Tibetan human rights as well as the rights of women in South and Southeast Asia. She is a board member of the San Francisco-based American Himalayan Foundation, and on a memorable Bay Area day led the Dalai Lama into the Greek Theater at Berkeley. She is also the proud mother of three sons.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will conduct the interview.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. No advance reservations will be taken for this event.

For information please call (415) 422-6828.
Cosponsored by the USF Media Studies Department.


 

Thursday, November 18, 2010 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter off Parker at Golden Gate Avenue

South Korea Today
A talk by Lee Jeong-Gwan, Korean Consul General in San Francisco

2010 11-18This November Seoul hosted the Group of Twenty summit with a focus on currency reform and economic imbalances in trade. In 2012 Seoul will host the global Nuclear Security Summit. How did South Korea arrive at this diplomatic pinnacle? How did it escape the worst aspects of the recent world recession? How is it balancing its relations with Japan, China, and the U.S., let alone belligerent North Korea? Come hear Consul General Lee's views.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow of the Center, will moderate.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Registration recommended; please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Intercultural Institute of Calfironia, Asia Society Northern California Center, and USF's Master's in International Studies Program.



 

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

Pixar
A visual presentation of film excerpts, with commentary by Tia Kratter, Art Director

2010 11-16With film the art medium of today, Coppola, Lucas, and Disney have created a Hollywood North in the Bay Area, Disney's PIXAR being the gem. Surpassing Japanese anime, PIXAR has created Nemo swimming over Australia's Great Barrier reef, a coral empire that is threatened by a warming Pacific; Wall-E who compacts waste on a toxic earth where no humans can live as they hover above in space ships; and a young Asian boy in "Up" who befriends an old Causasian man and teaches him how to bond across generations and races. Films like these represent US "soft power" as they influence global citizens; they also help in balance of payment issues as they are an export of one thing we don't import, and they create high-tech jobs in California.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. For reservations please call our Event Registration Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the USF Media Studies Department, the USF Department of Computer Science, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



 Wednesday, November 3, 2010 - 5:45 PM

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

Japanese Screens
A visual presentation by Melissa Rinne, Associate Curator of Japanese Art at the Asian Art Museum

2010 11-3The folding screen has been used in monumental Japanese paintings for more than twelve centuries. Over time styles have varied; however certain elements reappear. Rinne looks at examples from the current exhibit "Beyond Golden Clouds: Five Centuries of Japanese Screens". She moved here from Japan, having worked on the staffs of two of Japan's national museums.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. For reservations please call our Event Registration Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Japan Society of Northern California, the Japan Policy Research Institute at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

 


 

Wednesday - October 20, 2010 - 5:45 

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton, San Francisco

Mao's Great Famine
A talk by Frank Dikötter, Ph.D.

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dikotterFamine is a naturally localized calamity, bounded by geographic and climatic barriers. The famine that accompanied Mao Tse-tung's Great Leap Forward of 1959-61 devastated the whole of China, a clear indication that this catastrophe was man-made.

Frank Dikötter, Chair Professor of Humanities at Hong  Kong University, has written the authoritative account of how Mao's revolutionary romanticism combined with disastrous weather and official complicity at all levels to cost more than 45 million Chinese people their lives. Dikötter's work links up for the first time what happened in the corridors of power with the everyday experiences of ordinary people, giving voice to the dead and disenfranchised...

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Co-sponsored by Asia Society Northern California Center, the USF Asian Studies Program, the USF Chinese Students and Scholars Association, chinadialogue, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

Image credit: Vegetables are Green, Squash are Plump, Yield is Abundant by Jin Meisheng, (1959); from the IISH / Stefan R. Landsberger Collection. 


   

Thursday - October 14, 2010 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton, San Francisco

Damming Shangrila: Water and Security in the Himalayas
A talk by Isabel Hilton, Founder and CEO, chinadialogue


2010 10-14The Third Pole—parts of the Himalayas and the Tibetan plateau so named because it holds the largest reserve of fresh water outside the Arctic and Antarctic—is prone to earthquakes, subject to security tensions between neighbors, and afflicted by climate change. It is also one of the world's dam-building hotspots as the national governments of the region scramble for clean energy resources and control over the water itself. Will dam building build security or add to the risks? Join world renowned journalist Isabel Hilton and the USF community for discussion and analysis of dam building in the Himalayan region.

Isabel Hilton, a veteran journalist and China expert, has worked for The Sunday Times, The Independent, The Guardian, and The New Yorker. In 1992, she became a presenter of the BBC?s flagship program "The World Tonight" and currently presents BBC Radio Three's "Night Waves." She is perhaps best known for her book, The Search for the Panchen Lama.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Co-sponsored by Asia Society Northern California Center, International Rivers, the USF Master of Science in Environmental Management Program, Pacific Environment, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

Photo credit: © Matthieu Paley/paleyphoto.com


Wednesday - October 13, 2010 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton, San Francisco

Carved in Silence
A documentary film and discussion with Emmy Award-winning producer/director Felicia Lowe

2010 10-13With immigration again a hot issue in the U.S., this 45-minute film takes us back to the Exclusion Era, focusing on the detention of Chinese immigrants at Angel Island in San Francisco Bay, the gateway from Asia to America. Lowe combines interviews with historical footage and dramatic enactments to translate the impact of public policies into human terms.

Felicia Lowe is a veteran documentary producer and a descendant of Angel Island Immigration Station detainees who is actively involved with the preservation of the site.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow of the Center, will discuss the film with Lowe.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. For information and registration please call our Event Registration Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation, the Chinese Historical Society of America, USF's Media Studies Department, USF's Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

 


 


Thursday - October 7, 2010 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton, San Francisco

How Much Does a Child Cost?
The Journey of Kru Nam and Not For Sale


2010 10-727 million people are enslaved today and many of the victims are children.

While human trafficking and slavery still beset every corner of the world, including the Bay Area, children in certain places are at special risk. In the Golden Triangle region of Thailand—along its borders with Burma (Myanmar) and Laos—there are hundreds of thousands of street children who are not recognized as citizens. As stateless people, these children are denied education, health care, and other opportunities and protections of citizenship, making them particularly vulnerable to exploitation.

In this special forum artist-activist Kru Nam and scholar-activist David Batstone will provide a report from the frontlines of this humanitarian challenge. They will talk about what they are doing to rescue and fight for the rights of street children in northern Thailand, what else must be done, and the many ways you too can help re-abolish slavery in our own time.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

This preview of The Not for Sale Campaign's second Global Forum on Human Trafficking (October 14-15, 2010) is the first event in the JPRI Human Security Program for 20 10-2011. www.notforsalecampaign.org - www.jpri.org

Presented by the Japan Policy Research Institute at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and The Not For Sale Campaign. Cosponsored by Global Exchange, USF McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, USF Erasmus Community; USF University Ministry, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

Image used with the generous permission of the artist, Daniela Martinez, Copyright 2007; All Rights Reserved.   


  

Wednesday - October 6, 2010
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall (Parker at Golden Gate), San Francisco

Madama Butterfly

Excerpts from the opera and a discussion featuring Dr. Clifford (Kip) Cranna, Director of Music Administration at San Francisco Opera

2010 10-6In 1887 a French naval officer, Pierre Loti, created "Madame Chrysanthemum" as a calculating woman who sold her services to sailors. In her U.S. debut she morphed into an innocent, docile girl. A hit Broadway play for David Belasco, "Madame Buttferfly" went next to the London stage where Puccini saw and admired it. Eureka! We get exoticism mixed with sensualism, fulfilling the Western craving for Japonisme set to magnificent music. But is this just another orientalist stereotype unknown in post Meiji Japan but popular in Western myth?

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will discuss the opera with Dr. Cranna.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. For reservations please call our Event Registration Line at   (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the Japan Society of Northern California, USF's Performing Arts Department, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

Madama Butterfly photo by Dan Rest/Lyric Opera of Chicago




Wednesday - September 14, 2010 - 5:30 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall (Parker at Golden Gate), San Francisco

 

Galleons and Globalization: California Mission Arts and the Pacific Rim

2010 9-14A talk by Rev. Thomas Lucas, S.J., University Professor; Director, Thacher Gallery at USF , Department of Art + Architecture, USF College of Arts and Sciences

The Acapulco-Manila Galleons plied the Pacific trade routes from 1565 to 1815, exchanging American silver for Asian porcelains, silks, spices, and luxury goods, providing a steady trans-Pacific trade in books, artworks, liturgical and practical objects, as well as food stuffs. This illustrated lecture and a gallery tour present new insights into the impact of Asian and Central and South American art and artifacts on the development of material culture in Mission-era California.

For more information contact the USF Ricci Institute: (415) 422-6401 or ricci@usfca.edu



 

Thursday - September 9, 2010 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall (Parker at Golden Gate), San Francisco

Isabel Allende
An interview and book signing with the author of Island Beneath the Sea 

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2010 9-9Born in Peru and raised in Chile, Isabel Allende is the author of nine novels, four memoirs, and a trilogy of children?s novels. After her debut novel, House of the Spirits, her books have been best sellers translated into twenty-seven languages. Allende sets ner newest work in the Age of Revolution and slave revolts during which a beautiful slave and concubine makes her leap for freedom.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim, will interview Allende.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the USF Center for Latino Studies in the Americas (CELASA), USF?s Master?s International Studies Program, USF?s Latin American Studies Program, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Tuesday - September 7, 2010 - 5:30 PM

 

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100, Turk at Parker in San Francisco

Matteo Ricci: Jesuit and Scholar in the Middle Kingdom

2010 9-7A Free Public Talk by Rev. M. Antoni J. Ucerler, S.J., Research Fellow in Japanese History & Senior Tutor, Campion Hall, University of Oxford

Matteo Ricci, who died in Beijing four hundred years ago this year, was an extraordinary man who dedicated his life to bringing the Christian Faith to the Chinese people. He was respected as a man of virtue and scholarship who had traveled ?thousands of leagues from the West.? He is still remembered for the way in which he befriended the Chinese people in a spirit of openness and respect. This lecture explores how he learned about China and the ways in which he allowed himself to be transformed by this unique encounter.

For more information contact the USF Ricci Institute: (415) 422-6401 or ricci@usfca.edu




Wednesday - September 1, 2010 - 5:45 PM

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton, San Francisco


Shanghai's Green Giant

A visual presentation by Steve Weindel, a Principal at Gensler

2010 9-1The architectural footprint of the San Francisco firm Gensler can be found from Seoul to Shanghai to Singapore, but China has the crown jewel in what locals call The Shanghai Dragon, Gensler's 21st century environmental masterpiece. Truly a vertical city, the building will contain eight separate neighborhoods each 14 stories tall stacked on top of one another as the building soars skyward above Pudong.

At the outer perimeter of each floor of these neighborhoods will be city parks complete with trees and rest areas. Those enjoying the parks will be inside the double skin that covers the building. Rainwater recovery and grey water recycling systems will cut water use by 40 percent. The building will also have wind turbines to run the exterior lighting. Cooling and heating, two big energy hogs, will be provided in part through geothermal systems and thermal mass storage, i.e., giant ice machines that will produce ice at night for cooling use during the day. And the structure is a beautiful work of art; come see for yourself....

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Chinese Historical Society of America, the USF Department of Environmental Science, USF Environmental Studies Program, USF M.S. in Environmental Management Program, chinadialogue, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Wednesday, 19 May, 2010; 6:00 PM
Korean Center
1362 Post St., San Francisco

North Korea: Human Face Series, Part 5: A Discussion with Dr. Sharon PerrySenior Research Scientist at Stanford University of Medicine and the Center for International Security and Cooperation

 

2010 5-19Dr. Sharon Perry and her team were recently featured in the New York Times for their cutting-edge humanitarian work in North Korea. In an unprecedented collaboration between U.S. and North Korean tuberculosis experts, Dr. Perry has been leading a team of U.S. medical specialists working with doctors from Pyongyang's Ministry of Public Health to develop that country's first diagnostic laboratory for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). The team, consisting of 22 members chosen from Stanford, the Bay Area and beyond, traveled to North Korea for a month last November in an attempt to help combat the critical health problem and improve United States-North Korea relations. This was an important step in the project led by the Bay Area TB Consortium (BATC), which Perry directs, and the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI), a Washington nonprofit group working to strengthen global security. During 2008, in collaboration with Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation and Shorenstein APARC, she organized the Bay Area Tuberculosis Consortium to host a delegation of North Korean physicians to visit Bay Area TB programs and discuss opportunities for mutual cooperation.

Presented by Intercultural Institute of California and Korean Center, Inc. Co-sponsored by World Affairs Council, USF Center for the Pacific Rim, Japan Policy Research Institute, and the Nautilus Institute.

Please email CandaceChui@iic.edu to RSVP. www.koreancentersf.org




Monday, 10 May, 2010; 12:00 to 7:00 PM
Hotel Nikko San Francisco
222 Mason Street, San Francisco

 

Kanrin Maru Symposium: The Future of the U.S.-Japan Relationship
This international conference commemorates the 150th anniversary of Japan's first diplomatic mission to the United States and examines the outlook for Japan-U.S. Relations.

2010 5-10Agenda
The Symposium agenda will consist of a keynote luncheon (12pm-1:45pm); panels on business, diplomatic, and civil society dimensions of this critical bilateral relationship (2pm-5:30pm); and a reception (6pm-7pm).

Speakers
- Ambassador Michael Armacost (Shorenstein Distinguished Fellow, Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University; former U.S. Ambassador to Japan)
- Dr. Carol Cherkis (President, BioInfoStrategies)
- Dr. Richard B. Dasher (Director, US-Asia Technology Management Center, Stanford University)
- Joseph R. Donovan, Jr. (Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, U.S. Department of State)
- Glen S. Fukushima (CEO, Airbus Japan; former President, American Chamber of Commerce in Japan)
- Taro Kono (Member, House of Representatives of the Japanese Diet; Liberal Democratic Party)
- Dr. Daniel Okimoto (Professor Emeritus of Political Science & Director Emeritus, Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University)
- Dr. Koji Osawa (Managing Principal & Co-founder, Global Catalyst Partners)
- Yochiro Taku (Partner, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati)
- Hitoshi Tanaka (Senior Fellow, Japan Center for International Exchange; former Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Japan)
- Dr. Steven K. Vogel (Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley)

Registration
To register, please visit the registration page on the Japan Society's website.

Co-Sponsors
The Symposium is presented by The Japan Society of Northern California, in partnership with the Japanese Chamber of Commerce of Northern California, the Japan Policy Research Institute at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, JETRO San Francisco, and World Affairs Council of Northern California.



Tuesday, 4 May, 2010; 5:45 PM
Fromm Hall, USF Main Campus
(Enter off Parker between Golden Gate & Fulton)
China and the E-waste Export Challenge

2010 5-4How many cell phones, computers, and other hi-tech gadgets have you THROWN AWAY?

Electronic waste or "e-waste" is the fastest growing disposal problem in the world. The US alone produces over three million tons of e-waste in a single year. This creates mountains of highly toxic trash. Much of it ends up in China and other parts of the developing world, polluting entire towns, their soil, and water. The chemicals involved in this waste are known to cause among other things cancer, brain developmental damage in children, and birth defects. What can we do to strive toward international environmental and social justice? Be part of the solution. Hear our panel of experts discuss these problems and new approaches to dealing with the rising challenge of these ever-growing piles of toxic garbage.

Joshua Goldstein, Associate Professor at USC and author of Remains of the Everyday: One Hundred Years of Recycling in Beijing, will talk about e-waste in China; Steven Rockhold, Global Program Manager for Product Reuse and Recycling at Hewlett Packard, will give a presentation on HP's new hardware and supplies take-back programs for reuse and recycling; and James Kao, founder and CEO of GreenCitizen, Inc., will discuss the responsible repair and recycling of your electronics here in San Francisco.

Ted Smith, founder and former Executive Director of Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition, co-founder of the Electronics TakeBack Coalition, and co-founder and Coordinator of the International Campaign for Responsible Technology (ICRT) will moderate the discussion

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

Presented by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and chinadialogue. Co-sponsored by the USF Japan Policy Research Institute, the Asia Society Northern California and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Tuesday, 13 April, 2010; 5:45 PM
Fromm Hall, USF Main Campus
(Enter off Parker between Golden Gate & Fulton)

Splendid Shanghai
A Conversation with Wen-hsin Yeh, Ph.D.; Director, Institute of East Asia Studies, UC Berkeley

 

2010 4-13Dr. Yeh is a renowned historian of modern China; her "Shanghai Splendor" is the most important social and cultural study of this grand metropolis. In it she captures a dazzling urban kaleidoscope that took the lead in modernizing China. This year's "Shanghai Expo" expects to draw 70 million visitors, the cost of which exceeds what Beijing spent on the recent Olympics. All this had a tumultuous past, which Dr. Yeh will share as she captures the rise of a maritime and capitalistic behemoth.

Patrick L. Hatcher, Ph.D. Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

Co-Sponsored by Asia Society Northern California, the Chinese Historical Society of America, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.  




Monday, 12 April, 2010; 5:45 PM
Fromm Hall, USF Main Campus
(Enter off Parker between Golden Gate & Fulton)

 

A Screening of The Harimaya Bridge
A film written and directed by Aaron Woolfolk


2010 4-12This 2009 feature film was shot in Kochi Prefecture, Japan and in San Francisco and stars Ben Guillory, Saki Takaoka, Misa Shimizu, and Danny Glover. This is the director's first foray into feature films, and draws heavily on his experiences as an African-American transplant from the Bay Area teaching English in the rural Kochi region of Japan. A story of loss and redemption, one critic wrote of the film: "a poignant parable suggesting that true love knows no boundaries, perhaps not even death."

Patrick L. Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended. Please call our event registration line at (415) 422-6828.

Co-sponsored by Media Studies at USF, the Japan Policy Research Institute at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

The Harimaya Bridge opens Friday, April 23rd at the UA Stonestown Twin 2 Theater, 501 Buckingham Way, San Francisco. www.theharimayabridge.com




Friday, 9 April, 2010; 6:00 PM

Korean Center
1362 Post St., San Francisco

North Korea: Human Face Series, Part 4: A Discussion with Dr. Moon Jae PakChairman of the US-DPRK Medical Science Exchange Committee

2010 4-9This talk will highlight constructive solutions to humanitarian problems in North Korea through health diplomacy, and discuss how Americans can play a role in this. Dr. Pak will give an assessment of the development and current state of the North Korean medical care system, and examine difficulties it has encountered in the last twenty years. Dr. Pak will also speak on the economy of reunification of the Korean peninsula. This lecture is framed around the critical issue of "health diplomacy" as a way to engage North Korea. An emerging field of global policy, international health diplomacy is a cutting-edge field that interfaces between foreign policy, public health, and law and economics.

Dr. Moon Jae Pak serves as the Chairman of the US-DPRK Medical Science Exchange Committee. Dr. Pak visits North Korea on an annual basis as part of a medical delegation to the Pyongyang Medical Symposium. With almost 15 years of experience working on medical issues in North Korea, Dr. Pak is one of the most knowledgeable experts on public health in the DPRK. Dr. Pak received his MD from Yonsei University College of Medicine.

WHO report on Global Health Diplomacy - http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/85/12/07-045856/en/index.html

Presented by Intercultural Institute of California and Korean Center, Inc. Co-sponsored by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, Japan Policy Research Institute, and the Nautilus Institute.

Please email CandaceChui@iic.edu to RSVP. www.koreancentersf.org




Monday, 5 April, 2010; 5:45 PM
Fromm Hall, USF Main Campus
(Enter off Parker between Golden Gate & Fulton)

2010 4-5Pacific Rim Business Triangle: Economic and Political Dimensions of U.S.-China-Taiwan Relations
A panel discussion presented by
The Japan Policy Research Institute at USF Center for the Pacific Rim and The Asia Society Northern California, and featuring

Robert A. Kapp, Ph.D. (moderator)
President, Robert A. Kapp & Associates, Inc.; former President, U.S.-China Business Council

Thomas B. Gold, Ph.D. Professor of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley; Executive Director, Inter-University Program for Chinese Language Studies at Tsinghua University

Bret E. Lee Executive Director, Taiwan Trade Center, San Francisco

Jean Oi, Ph.D. Director, Stanford China Program; William Haas Professor in Chinese Politics; Senior Fellow in the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University  

 

This event is part of the opening ceremony for the 2010 Bay Area Strait Talk Symposium , a week of workshops and public events to promote peaceful relations across the Taiwan Strait and Pacific Rim. Strait Talk, which established a Berkeley chapter last year, was founded at Brown in 2005 as a student-centered "non-partisan dialogue program that seeks to transform international conflict by connecting young people from both sides of the Taiwan Strait and the United States" and by "empowering them" through conflict resolution training so that they become the next generation of peacemakers.

Join us for what promises to be a stimulating panel discussion and a lively Q&A session.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

Co-Sponsored by Strait Talk, Berkeley Chapter; Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California Berkeley; China Dialogue; and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Wednesday, 24 March, 2010; 5:45 PM
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(Enter off Turk at Chabot or Parker)

 

Taiwan Today
A conversation with Thomas J.C. Chen, Director General, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, San Francisco

2010 3-24The Republic of China on the island of Taiwan today has an advanced industrial economy combined with a robust democracy, the envy of East Asia. All this is part of a great transformation that occurred in the past sixty years as this once poor island reformed its institutions to match the best in the world. After a major land reform, its elites moved from low-tech (textiles) to high-tech (computers), its export-driven economy reaped many domestic reqards such as a fast train that matches the French TGV and the Japanese bullet. Its lively political arena is a far cry from the one-party rule seen elsewhere. How did this Taiwanese miracle happen? Come hear Director General Chen explain. 

In conversation with Director General Chen will be Dr. Shalendra D. Sharma of the USF Politics Department and Dr. Patrick L. Hatcher of the USF Center for the Pacific Rim. Dr. Sharma is the author of China and India in the Age of Globalization (Cambridge University Press). Dr. Hatcher is the author of The Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalism in Vietnam.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

Presented by the Center for the Pacific Rim and the USF Politics Department. Cosponsored by theChinese Historical Society of America, the USF School of Business and Professional Studies, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




The USF Center for the Pacific Rim and Master of Arts in Asia Pacific Studies Mini-Festival at the

28th International Asian Film Festival 

INDEPENDENCIA
(Philippines, 2009, 77 mins); In Tagalog with English subtitles
Director: Raya Martin

IndependenciaThe second of a planned trilogy on the history of the Philippines, Independencia takes place during the American occupation of the early 20th century, the film's plot is stripped to an essential framework (a man, a woman and a child hide from American patrols in the jungle rains), the better to address more weighty, complex ideas on culture, history, colonialism and cinema itself. To recreate the classic Hollywood look, Martin constructed an elaborate "jungle" set indoors, using backdrops intricatedly hand-painted by local artists... [Learn More or Buy Tickets]

 

 

Friday, 12 March | 7:00PM | PFA / Berkeley
Sunday, 14 March | 4:30PM | Kabuki

A VILLAGE CALLED VERSAILLES
(USA | 2009 | 68 mins); In English
Director: S. Leo Chiang

A VILLAGE CALLED VERSAILLESLargely ignored when Hurricane Katrina temporarily brought attention to America's racial and class divides was the city's Vietnamese community. After tracing the history of the Vietnamese in New Orleans, Village focuses on Mary Queen of Vietnam Church, which took on an even greater importance for this community in the post-Katrina landscape. Forced once again into the role of refugee, the people of Versailles used the church as a base for the massive reconstruction - and considerable struggle with local and federal authorities - that lay ahead... [Learn More or Buy Tickets]

Saturday, March 13 | 2:15PM | Kabuki
Tuesday, March 16 | 9:00PM | VIZ
Saturday, March 20 | 5:30PM | Camera / San Jose

 

NINOY AQUINO & THE RISE OF PEOPLE POWER
(USA | 2009 | 57 mins); In English
Producer/Writer/Cinematographer: Tom Coffman

NINOY AQUINOBenigno "Ninoy" Aquino fought an unending battle for political reform in the name of the country and people he so fiercely loved. His critiques of President Ferdinand Marcos made him a political prisoner for seven years, and an exile in the United states for five. Ninoy insisted on returning home despite knowing an attempt on his life would be all but certain. With striking archival footage and revealing interviews, Ninoy offers a compelling portrait of a political martyr and revolutionary leader. His legacy is the "indomitable spirit" and the enduring belief that our "readiness to suffer will light the torch of freedom which can never be put out..." [Learn More or Buy Tickets]

Saturday, March 13 | 4:30PM | Kabuki (North American Premiere)
Wednesday, March 17 | 7:00PM | VIZ

 

CITY OF LIFE AND DEATH (NANJING! NANJING!)
(China | 2009 | 133 mins); In Chinese, English, and Japanese with English subtitles
Director: LU Chuan

CITY OF LIFE AND DEATHThe Nanking Massacre stirs great emotions and controversy to this day. Acclaimed Chinese director LU Chuan spent four years developing a stunning epic on the tragedy. Beginning with the city?s invasion and occupation by the Japanese Army, the film follows the conflict through a series of Chinese, Japanese, and European characters (many based on real-life individuals). Shooting in arresting black and white images, Lu is less concerned with showing unspeakable violence than in capturing the chaos and confusion of war, and how that madness ultimately brings out the best and worst of humanity...  [Learn More or Buy Tickets]

Wednesday, March 17 | 9:10PM | Kabuki
Friday, March 19 | 9:10PM | PFA / Berkeley

VENUES: Kabuki: Post @ Fillmore, SF; VIZ: Post @ Webster, SF; PFA: Bancroft @Bowditch, Berkeley; Camera, 201 S. 2nd, San Jose
FOR TICKETS or more information, visit http://festival.asianamericanmedia.org/2010/  




Wednesday, 10 March, 2010; 5:45 PM
Fromm Hall, USF Main Campus
(Enter off Parker between Golden Gate & Fulton)

 

Imagining Atrocity: Lu Chuan's City of Life and Death and the Nanjing Massacre on Film
An illustrated talk by Michael Berry, Ph.D., UC Santa Barbara Contemporary Chinese Cultural Studies

Imagining AtrocityOn December 13, 1937 the Japanese army entered the Chinese capital of Nanjing, beginning a six week slaughter where an estimated 300,000 Chinese citizens were killed. The incident was largely marginalized in the west (until the 1997 publication of Iris Chang's bestselling (The Rape of Nanking) and consistently underplayed in China for political reasons. In China, it was not until the mid-eighties, when the Nanjing Massacre suddenly began to reenter Chinese public discourse and popular consciousness (via a changing PRC political agenda), that a handful of celluloid depictions of the Rape of Nanjing began to grace theaters and classrooms in China. This talk will trace the evolution of the Nanjing Massacre through popular culture, with special attention to cinema and television. From Luo Guanqun's 1987 film Massacre in Nanjing (Tucheng xuezheng) to Lu Chuan's landmark 2009 film City of Life and Death, (Nanjing! Nanjing!) , Professor Berry will explore the intermingling of history, politics and the cinematic imagination of the Nanjing Massacre in contemporary China.

Michael Berry is associate professor of contemporary Chinese cultural studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of Speaking in Images: Interviews with Contemporary Chinese Filmmakers (Columbia, 2005; Rye Field, 2007; Guangxi Normal University Press, 2008), A History of Pain: Trauma in Modern Chinese Literature and Film (Columbia, 2008, Rye Field,. 2010) and Jia Zhangke's The Hometown Trilogy (British Film Institute & Palgrave Macmillan, 2009; Guangxi Normal University Press, 2010). He is also the translator of several novels, including The Song of Everlasting Sorrow (with Susan Chan Egan) (Columbia, 2008), To Live (Anchor, 2004), Nanjing 1937: A Love Story (Columbia, 2002, Anchor, 2004, Faber & Faber, 2004), and Wild Kids: Two Novels about Growing Up (Columbia, 2000).

Chiho Sawada, Ph.D., Director of the Japan Policy Research Institute at the Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828. City of Life and Death will screen on Wednesday, March 17 at 9:10pm at the Kabuki Sundance Theaters in San Francisco, and on Friday, March 19 at 9:10pm at the PFA in Berkeley. To purchase tickets visit the Film Festival site.

Cosponsored by the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival, the Japan Policy Research Institute at the Center for the Pacific Rim, the USF Chinese Students and Scholars Association, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Monday, 8 March, 2010; 5:45 PM
Fromm Hall, USF Main Campus
(Enter off Parker between Golden Gate & Fulton)

Shanghai
An illustrated talk by Michael Knight, Ph.D., Senior Curator of Chinese Art at the Asian Art Museum

2010 3-8With 70 million visitors expected this spring at World Expo Shanghai, Dr Knight will give you a less-crowded, up-close view of the tumultuous history of one of Asia's most dynamic cities through 130 art works including oil paintings, Deco furniture, revolutionary posters, high fashion, & motion pictures. He will take you back to the mid 19th century when the city was a modest port, then transport you to China's Pacific Rim megalopolis of the 21st century. 

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

PERMISSION TO USE THE IMAGE above and on the card that has been distributed has been graciously arranged by the Asian Art Museum:
Moonlight over Huangpu River, 1930s
By Yuan Xiutang (dates unknown)
Poster, chromolithograph
H.53.4 x W. 77.2 cm
Collection of the Shanghai History Museum

Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California, the Chinese Historical Society of America, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Tuesday, 23 February, 2010; 5:45 PM
 
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100 (NOTE THIS IS OUR OLD LONE MOUNTAIN VENUE) 
(Turk at Parker in San Francisco) 

An Evening with Authors Peter Hessler and Leslie Chang

Peter Hessler won the Kiriyama Prize for River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze, a memoir the Wall Street Journal called "a classic tale of the American abroad." the Wall Street Journal welcomed his next book Oracle Bones: A Journey between China's Past and Present with even greater praise: "everyone in the Western world should read this book.? Now we have his newest Country Driving: A Journey through China from Farm to Factory. Besides books his articles appear in theNew York TimesAtlantic Monthly, the New Yorker, and National Geographic 

Leslie Chang 's Factory Girls: From Village to City in a Changing China met a chorus of praise. TheFinancial Times called it "elegant", the Chicago Tribune, "excellent", the Boston Globe, "fascinating". China has 130 million migrant workers, the largest migration in humans history. Chang tells her story through two women workers in a sneaker factory so large that it has its own hospital! She is now married to Peter Hessler and calls Colorado, not China, her current home.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim, will interview the authors; book signing will follow.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California, the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the Chinese Historical Society of America, China Dialogue, and the USF School of Business and Professional Studies.




Thursday, 18 February, 2010; 5:45 PM
 
Fromm Hall, USF Main Campus 
(Enter off Parker between Golden Gate & Fulton) 
The USF Center for the Pacific Rim in conjunction with the USF Department of Economics presents
The 2010 Y.L. Wu Lecture
China's Environmental Challenge Delivered by Elizabeth C. Economy, Ph.D., C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies, Council on Foreign Relations

China's economic growth has come at a steep price. Levels of air and water pollution as well as land degradation are among the highest in the world. China is among the leading contributors to global climate change, pollution of the Pacific, and the illegal timber trade. What are China's leaders doing to address the environmental consequences of development? Can they protect its environment and sustain economic growth?

The program will be co-hosted by Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim, and Hartmut Fischer, Ph.D., Professor of Economics at USF.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California, the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the Chinese Historical Society of America, China Dialogue, and the USF School of Business and Professional Studies.

This annual lecture honors the memory of Y.L. Wu, USF Professor of Economics, 1960-1988.

 



Wednesday, 17 February, 2010; 5:45 PM

Fromm Hall, USF Main Campus 
(Enter off Parker between Golden Gate & Fulton)

Pacific Ascendency and American Power 
A discussion with Bruce Cumings, Ph.D., University of Chicago

Professor Cumings first book, The Origins of the Korean War, won the John King Fairbank Award. He edited the Cambridge History of Korea(forthcoming) and is a frequent contributor to The London Review of Books, the Nation, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, and Le Monde Diplomatique. Cumings is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and consulted on the six-hour PBS film, "Korea: The Unknown War". At Chicago he is the Gustavus F. & Ann M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor in History and won the Kim Dae Jung Prize for Scholarly Contributions to Democracy. He has just publishedDominion from Sea to Sea (Yale University Press.)

Patrick L. Hatcher, Ph.D. Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning at USF, the Korean Center, Inc., and the Asia Society Northern California.