The University of San Francisco: School of Nursing
bridge
Children
Patients in Ward
VATM in class
Terrace farm
Nguyen in Simulator
Holding C cards
UG_Vietnam_Nurse

Vietnam Nurse Project

First established by Dr. Gregory Crow, RN, EdD, in 2007, the Vietnam Nurse Project is in its fourth year of exchange between graduate students and faculty in the School of Nursing and Health Professions at the University of San Francisco and the Bach Mai Nursing School and the Bach Mai Medical Center in Hanoi, Vietnam. The project aims to improve the health and well being of the people of Vietnam by improving the education, training, and practice of the nurses who serve them. The project also aims to create nurse leaders who will partner with the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education and Training in Vietnam to develop more effective nursing education and practice.

The program bridges academics and nursing practice in partnership with the Vietnam Academy of Traditional Medicine School of Nursing; Thanh Nhan Medical Center; An Khanh School of Nursing; Bach Mai Nursing School, Bach Mai Medical Center; and the University of San Francisco.

Vietnam Nurse Project from Mathew Mitchell on Vimeo.

Currently, the program includes several nurse education and practice projects within the program's partner institutions in Vietnam. Alongside their Vietnam partners, participants in the Vietnam Nurse Project work to develop a nursing education curriculum that reflects Western and international patient care techniques and methods. Physicians in Hanoi are often trained to perform Western-style medical procedures, but qualified nurses to care for patients post-operatively, during follow-up appointments, and in clinics and community health centers are needed. An enhanced curriculum expands expert nursing practice and education, and serves the Vietnam health care system in meeting the needs of its citizens.

Faculty, students, and staff in the Vietnam Nurse Project work to develop innovate educational and leadership practices in their partnering classrooms and institutions. Through enhancing curricula, utilizing technology, and shifting classroom instruction and practice to a student-centered approach, participants in the project work to improve student learning and enhance nursing expertise in Vietnam. Most importantly, faculty, students, and staff participate in a global learning experience. In addition to sharing their knowledge of Western health care practices, participants from the University of San Francisco learn about Eastern health care philosophies and patient care methods.