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Course Descriptions

Accounting for Lawyers - 3 units

This course will provide a technical and conceptual foundation in financial accounting skills which are relevant for attorneys who advise business entities. Accordingly, this course will emphasize the interpretation and use of financial statements and accounting schedules in the practice of law and their related legal implications. This course will be very different from most tradition Law School courses which typically employ an extensive study of relevant case law; instead, this course will primarily focus on interpreting relevant accounting pronouncements and concepts. 

Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure - 3 units

This course covers many critical issues not considered in the Criminal Procedure course, which focuses on the Fourth (search and seizure), Fifth (interrogations), and Sixth (counsel) Amendments.  Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure deals with such post-investigative issues as police and prosecution discretion to bring criminal charges, the complaint, initial appearance, bail, preliminary examination, grand jury, joinder and severance, motion practice, discovery, pleas, continuance, time limitations, jurisdiction and venue, trial, and double jeopardy.  The course will examine both the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and California criminal procedure.  Criminal Law is a prerequisite.  Prerequisites: Criminal Law

Administrative Law - 3 units

This course considers the relationship between agencies and the other branches of government, the rulemaking and adjudicatory procedures by which agencies implement congressional statues, and the role of the courts in reviewing agency actions. The course will examine the tension between allowing agencies the flexibility to manage complex regulatory and benefit programs efficiently, while at the same time ensuring fair treatment and accountability to those they serve. Since many lawyers practice in regulated areas -- such as food and drug law; housing and zoning law; energy law; communications law; business, corporate and securities law; employment and labor law; environmental law, and other regulated fields -- this course can be very valuable in understanding the regulatory process and agency operations. 

Advanced Constitutional Law - 3 units

This course builds upon the required Constitutional Law course, offering a more in-depth analysis of Individual Rights. We will compare broadly across various constitutional doctrines that protect both equality and liberty. For the purpose of gaining a more holistic perspective of constitutional adjudication, we will focus on a close reading of select cases in their entire, unedited, original versions. Also, we will emphasize historical lessons about the relationship between social change and constitutional interpretation, and also highlight contemporary constitutional controversies. Your thorough preparation and lively participation will be necessary to enrich our experience together. Prerequisites: Constitutional Law

Advanced Criminal Law/Criminal Litigation - 1 units

 Prerequisites: Criminal Procedure, Recommended (not req'd): Evidence

Advanced Legal Research - 2 units

A course designed to teach "real-world" legal research skills that will prepare students for the research challenges they will encounter in legal practice. Assignments, lectures, and regular hands-on in-class exercises will emphasize cost-efficient research strategies, legal technology and current resources for attorneys, as well as Internet research. Written assignments will emulate research assignments typically given to attorneys new to practice. Students who completed California Legal Research are not eligible to enroll. Prerequisites: LRWA I & II

Advanced Legal Research (Online Course) - 3 units

This entirely online course (available via TWEN) is designed to teach students how to develop effective and efficient research strategies for a variety of different legal research tasks.  The course will cover both federal and California law and will delve into secondary source selection, case and statutory research, regulatory research, and legislative history research. Students will be expected to spend approximately 20 hours per week on the following tasks: reading assignments, participating in online discussions with other students on topics assigned by the instructor, and completing a weekly graded research assignment. During portions of the course, students may also be expected to watch video presentations or listen to podcasts.  An instructor will be available for “live chat” office hours for three hours each week using the “live discussion” feature on TWEN.  As with in-person courses, instructors will also be available for student consultations via email or telephone throughout the course. This course does not have a final exam, but students will be required to complete a graded research assignment during each week of the course. Prerequisites: Students are only eligible to enroll in this course if they have already completed 28 credit hours toward the JD degree. Also, students must have completed LRWA or its equivalent with a passing grade in order to enroll in this course. Students will need robust internet access in order to participate in this class.

Advanced Legal Writing: Federal Civil Pre-Trial Pleadings and Motion Practice - 3 units

This course gives students an opportunity to draft pleadings, motions, and other forms of legal writing common to civil federal court practice. Students will research and write complaints, answers, meet and confer correspondence, and motion and opposition briefs, based on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

Alternative Dispute Resolution - 3 units

A general introduction to the field of ADR. This addresses the enforceability of arbitration and other alternative dispute resolution agreements, as well as the ethical issues raised in the field. A series of simulations will be used to introduce students to the theories and skills used in negotiation and mediation. 

American Legal Systems I - 2 units

This course begins with an overview of the U.S. Constitution, the structure of the federal government, and federal and state judicial systems.  Special emphasis is given to the relation between state and federal courts and the selection and function of American judges and juries. Selected judicial interpretations of constitutional law and contract law are discussed. The course includes legal research and writing components including classes introducing the students to Westlaw/Lexis; locating federal statutes; locating federal cases, and locating law review articles which are all discussed in class. Students are given an overview of each of these components and do exercises which are discussed in subsequent classes.  Classes are punctuated with visits to the California Supreme Court and the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Afterwards, students write papers comparing one aspect of law in their country with U.S. law. Prerequisites: (Foreign Students Only) (2 credits fall, 2 credits spring) Required for all LLM students who have not received a prior degree from an American law school.

American Legal Writing and American Legal System II - 2 units

The goal of this course is to introduce the students to some of the skills they will need in order to execute the needs of an American client, whether they work abroad or in the U.S. The class covers the basics of American Legal Writing, including fact gathering, legal analysis, problem-solving for a client, writing objective legal memoranda and writing persuasive legal briefs.  Students also practice oral advocacy. In addition, students observe a jury trial, visit San Quentin Prison, and write papers about their experiences afterwards. Prerequisites: (Foreign Students Only) (2 credits fall, 2 credits spring) Required for all LLM students who have not received a prior degree from an American law school.

Antitrust - 3 units

A study of federal and state laws promoting a free market economy. The course also considers some aspects of the competition laws in their international application including the laws of jurisdictions outside the U.S. The focus is on legal prohibitions against price fixing combinations, restraints of trade, monopolization of markets, and anti-competitive mergers. The main laws studied are the federal Sherman Act, Clayton Act, and Federal Trade Commission Act. Emphasis is placed on the ability to evaluate the antitrust risks present in proposed business and marketing plans.

Antitrust Law and Intellectual Property Rights - 2 units

This antitrust course focuses on the relationship between antitrust and intellectual property law , addressing how they generally complement but occasionally conflict with each other. The course will analyze various intellectual property licensing practices under governing antitrust principles, the extent of a patent owner’s right to exclude others from technology markets, antitrust risks in the prosecution or settlement of intellectual property claims, how adoption of industry standards for intellectual property can violate the antitrust laws , and similar practices. It also includes a comparative analysis between antitrust liability and the defense of patent misuse.

Appellate Advocacy - 3 units

An advanced advocacy course that teaches the complementary skills of brief writing and oral argument at a sophisticated level.  Prerequisites: Moot Court and membership on the 2014-15 advocacy teams

Applied Evidence - 1 units

A skills course devoted to practicing the application of evidence rules in fast-paced courtroom scenarios. Students participate in weekly trial exercises for which they must research issues, prepare a direct or cross-examination, and plan for objections and responses. Also covers the proper admission of evidence. Students receive immediate feedback after each practice session.  Prerequisites: Evidence

Arbitration - 3 units

This course will examine the utility of arbitration as a dispute resolution process. The course is designed as both a lecture and practice course. The lecture portion of the course describes legal principles applicable to arbitration derived from statutory and decisional authority. In the practice portion of the course students draft arbitration agreements, advocate for and against arbitration, and experience the differences between advocacy in arbitration and advocacy in court.

Asian Legal Systems - 2 units

This course surveys the legal systems of the 15 Asian countries and compares them to each other and to the legal system of the United States.  It begins with the constitutions of the countries and then focuses on laws relating to such matters as business transactions, competition law, intellectual property, dispute resolution, corporations, and the fight against corruption. Law is presented against the he background and interaction of culture and religion and histories of the countries.  The course is taught in four modules: a “Central Module” which considers countries and as a whole, a “China Related Module” which covers China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, a “Strategic Rim Module” which covers Japan, the Koreas, and the Philippines, and Vietnam, and “Southern Eclectic Module, which covers Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, and emerging Myanmar (Burma), where English, Dutch, and Islamic law have an historic and current influence.

ASP or LawPlus Tutors - 2 units

Bankruptcy - 3 units

A study of creditors' rights and debtors' protection under the Federal Bankruptcy Code. The course provides an overview of liquidation and reorganization, both for individuals and corporations. Debtor-creditor relations under state law are also considered, both as an alternative to bankruptcy and as they relate to proceedings in bankruptcy . 

Bioethics - 3 units

Focusing on the interface of law, medicine, and ethics, this course will examine a number of issues concerning reproductive rights, death and dying, medical research, genetic technology, access to health care and health care decision making.  Within the context, we also will seek to analyze the way that our definition of individual rights reflects our assumptions regarding nature, technology, and various human relationships.

Biotechnology Seminar - 2 units

The class is an overview of intellectual property and regulatory issues impacting the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Basic principle of licensing, litigation, and international law will also be discussed. The course will focus on the impact of the legal system on research, products, and intellectual property for companies and institutions. Throughout the course, students will be asked to think about the following issues: (1) How do legal issues promote or hinder the development of technology, (2) What role should ethics and public health concerns play in the law, and (3) Does a “one size fits all” patent law make sense for biotechnology. Although there are no formal prerequisites for this course, a prior course in intellectual property law or some life science background would be helpful. Prerequisites: Basic IP experience of any sort.

California Civil Discovery - 2 units

 Formerly: Discovery. An advanced course in the discovery and other related aspects of civil procedure. Emphasis is placed on the conduct and use (both at trial an in the negotiation of settlements) of oral depositions, written interrogatories, production of documents, and other discovery and disclosure techniques. 

California Construction Law - 3 units

A class that provides a broad, basic understanding of construction law including methods of contracting and issues in the context of construction disputes.

California Legal Research - 2 units

 Designed primarily for second, third, and fourth-year law students who are planning to practice law in California, this overview course will provide practical legal research skills to help prepare students to conduct legal research as clerks, interns, or new attorneys. Assignments, lectures, and regular hands-on in-class exercises will emphasize cost-efficient research strategies, print and online legal materials, and law practice technology. Written assignments will emulate research assignments typically given to attorneys new to practice. Lectures and assignments will focus on California law, court systems and practice materials. Students who completed Advanced Legal Research are not eligible to enroll.  Prerequisites: LRWA I & II

Tax LLM: California Tax Appeals Assistance Program: Sales & Use Tax - units

The Tax Appeals Assistance Program provides students with the opportunity to assist low-income individuals in certain tax disputes before the California Board of Equalization ("BOE"). The Sales and Use Tax Clinic provides students with real world experience. Under the supervision of an attorney, students represent clients who are appealing Sales and Use Tax assessments issued by the Board of Equalization. Students conduct client interviews and counseling, prepare legal briefs, perform case strategy, and negotiate with auditors and settlement attorneys. Students often have the opportunity to represent clients in a litigation setting at appeals conferences and oral hearings.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Child Advocacy Clinic - 6 units

 In the Child Advocacy Clinic, students receive training and, under the supervision of the clinic director, represent abused, neglected, or abandoned children in child welfare proceedings. Clinic activities include interviewing clients, investigation, writing and responding to motions, and court appearances on behalf of clients in San Francisco Superior and Juvenile Courts, as well as the California Court of Appeal and the California Supreme Court.  Prerequisites: Selection by instructor. Co-requisite – Evidence. Recommended – Juvenile Law.

Chinese Law - 2 units

This course will provide an overview of the key areas of Chinese law, including civil and criminal law, constitutional and administrative law, and economic and financial law. It will focus especially on the framework of Chinese law in different fields: law-making, law-enforcing, legal profession and legal education. It also examines the legal system of China, form its cultural basis to the implication for modernization and China's participation in the international community.

Civil Externship - 3-13 units

The Civil Externship Law Program gives upper-division students the opportunity to put their education in practice by working at law firms, legal departments, and public interest and government agencies for academic credit. See the Externship Section of the website for detailed information.

Civil Procedure - 4 units

A study of the mechanics of litigation and the rules which govern enforcement of the rights and duties studied in substantive law courses. Broad coverage includes an introduction to federal and state court organization, jurisdiction and procedure. There is particular consideration of venue, process, joinder of parties and causes, class actions, pre-trial motions and discovery, trials, post-trial motions, appellate review, and finality and effects of judgments and decrees. Consideration is given to both the California Code of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. 

Commercial Real Estate Transactions - 3 units

This course will prepare students to represent clients in commercial real estate transactions.  We will investigate the legal implications of each of the key phases of every real estate transaction—letter of intent negotiation, purchase and sale agreement negotiation, due diligence review, loan negotiation, legal opinion preparation and closing escrow requirements to name a few—in the order they occur.  We will pay particular attention to today’s credit markets and the loan products they offer, as well as to California’s deed of trust practice and unique creditors rights laws.  Along the way, we will have guest speakers on particular topics of interest.  Materials will include case law, as well as actual letters of intent, purchase and sale agreements, due diligence documentation, title reports, loan agreements, escrow instructions and the like.   Prerequisites: Property. Recommended: Corporations & Federal Tax.

Commercial Transactions - 3 units

A study of the legal rights and obligations arising from contracts for the sale of goods. The course focuses on domestic sales governed by Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code and includes some selected coverage of leases under Articles 2A as well as other sources of domestic and international sales and leasing law such as the UN Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). Topics include the scope of the UCC; formation and terms of the sales contract; allocating risk of loss; warranties; non-performance and breach; and enforcement and remedies.

Community Property - 2 units

 A survey of the development and operation of the community property system in California. Particular emphasis is placed on an analysis of the creation of and nature of interests in community property and the distinction, sources, and classification of individual and community property. Coverage includes vesting of rights, transmutations, presumptions, tracing, commingling, and apportionment and disposition of property upon death or lifetime dissolution of marriage.  Prerequisites: Property

Comparative Law - 3 units

This course offers an introduction to the theoretical and practical issues of comparative law. It provides an overview of the main traditions of legal thought and traces the evolution of both civil and common law systems as they have been adapted and transplanted to jurisdictions around the world. Although the focus of the class is primarily methodological, the course will also include comparisons of substantive case law.

Competition Team: ABA Labor & Employment Law Trials Competition - 2 units

 The American Bar Association's Section of Labor and Employment Law established the LEL Trial Advocacy Competition to introduce law students to the challenges and rewards of employment and labor litigation.  Law students who participate in the Competition have the opportunity to develop their trial advocacy technique in a mock courtroom experience. The Competition offers participating students a forum in which they may develop the skills they will be using as practitioners, and a chance to meet and network with fellow law students and labor and employment law practitioners.

Competition Team: Asylum Competition - 2 units

The UC Davis Asylum & Refugee Law National Moot Court Competition is the only competition in the nation devoted exclusively to the topic of asylum and refugee law. It is also the only immigration law moot court competition on the West Coast. The competition provides law students from across the country the opportunity to participate in a hypothetical appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Competitors will write a brief as either respondent or petitioner on an issue related to asylum and refugee law. Shortly after submitting their briefs, students will participate in oral arguments. Students’ briefs and oral arguments will be judged by prominent judges, attorneys and scholars that specialize in the areas of immigration law and/or appellate advocacy.

Competition Team: Jessup Competition - 2 units

Jessup is the world's largest moot court competition, with participants from over 550 law schools in more than 80 countries. The Competition is a simulation of a fictional dispute between countries before the International Court of Justice, the judicial organ of the United Nations. One team is allowed to participate from every eligible school. Teams prepare oral and written pleadings arguing both the applicant and respondent positions of the case. Thousands of law students from around the world will work all year long on the season's Jessup Problem. Students must first compete in qualifying competitions (mostly held in January-March) to earn the right to advance to the White & Case International Rounds held every spring in Washington, D.C.

Competition Team: Lefkowitz Competition - 2 units

The Saul Lefkowitz Moot Court Competition is an annual event honoring Saul Lefkowitz, whose entire distinguished career was dedicated to the development of trademark and unfair competition law. The competition introduces law students to important issues arising in U.S. trademark and unfair competition law. Students develop their brief writing and oral advocacy skills in a mock courtroom experience. The competition is open to teams of students from U.S. accredited law schools. Approximately 80 teams of law students participate in the competition each year.  Students are expected to write a brief reflecting the issues in the Fact Pattern/Problem.  Students will then argue the case in regional and national competitions before a panel of volunteer attorneys, judges from various district and other courts, members of the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and jurists from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. 

Competition Team: National Appellate Advocacy Competition - 2 units

The ABA Law Student Division National Appellate Advocacy Competition (NAAC) emphasizes the development of oral advocacy skills through a realistic appellate advocacy experience. Competitors participate in a hypothetical appeal to the United States Supreme Court. The competition involves writing a brief as either respondent or petitioner and then arguing the case in front of the mock court.

Competition Team: National Criminal Trial Advocacy Competition - 2 units

Organized by the California Attorneys for Criminal Justice and UC Hastings School of Law, this competition features a criminal trial case.  The competition features 24 law school teams from all around the country. Each team is comprised of four students who must prepare both a prosecution and defense team; each student performs the role of advocate and witness and following every round, the team must switch roles. 

Competition Team: National Moot Court Competition - 2 units

This long-running competition is run by the Young Lawyers Committee and co-sponsored by the American College of Trial Lawyers.  Since 1950, this competition has strived to promote the art of appellate advocacy through intellectual rigor and persuasive argument. Every year, over 150 law schools compete in the regional rounds throughout the U.S., and the winners advance to the final rounds held at the New York City Bar. This widely–recognized National Moot Court Competition allows law students to hone their appellate advocacy skills by arguing before prominent members of our profession.

Competition Team:Thomas Tang Moot Court Competition - 2 units

Hosted by the University of San Diego, this tournament provides advocates with the opportunity to argue challenging and timely issues related to criminal procedure before experienced and knowledgeable members of the California Bench Bar. 

Competition Team:USF Moot Court Competition (AYC) - 1 units

Competition Team: Wagner Employment Law Competition - 2 units

The New York Law School Moot Court Association administers the Robert F. Wagner National Labor & Employment Law Moot Court Competition in honor of the late U.S. Senator and distinguished alumnus. The competition is the nation’s largest student-run moot court competition and the premier national competition dedicated exclusively to labor and employment law. For over 30 years, schools from across the country have competed in this prestigious event.

Constitutional Law - units

 This course is an examination of the American constitutional system. Principles and practices of judicial review and interpretation in constitutional cases are studied with particular reference to the decisions of the United States Supreme Court. There is an examination of selected Congressional Powers, the authority of the President, and constitutional limitations on the exercise of governmental powers and the distribution of power between the federal and state governments. The course also focuses on the guarantees of individual rights, with an intensive coverage of freedom of expression, religious liberty, due process, and equal protection of the laws. 

Contemplative Lawyering - 2 units

 This class will expose students to contemplative practices derived from a variety of religious and secular (wisdom) traditions to help them develop lawyering skills that are essential in litigation and transactional practices, including interviewing, counseling, negotiating, problem-solving and advocacy. These lawyering skills require the personal capacity to focus without distraction; to respect and empathize with clients and colleagues; to listen and explain with open-mindedness and patience; to inject creativity into problem-solving; to facilitate productive communication among adversaries; to deal constructively with conflict; and to engage in honest and fearless self-critique. In order to develop these underlying abilities students will learn about and perform various contemplative practices and apply these practices to their own actual legal experiences (e.g. law school studies and externships/internships) in an iterative process. Development of these abilities will be supported by assigned readings, class discussions, writing assignments and regular contemplative practice. The ultimate goal of the class is to enable students to cultivate essential lawyering skills in a manner conducive to practicing law as thoughtful, grounded and moral people. 

Contemporary Issues of Race and Law - 3 units

Former title: Racism & Justice in American Legal History, students may not earn credit for both courses. An examination of the history, politics, theory and law related to race and ethnicity in America. Attention will be given to anti-discrimination law and, in addition, to a survey of racial issues embedded in core areas such as criminal, contract, tort and property law. Emphasis will be on providing critical contextual perspective on the intersection between racialized experience and the law, and on increasing student's critical thinking, writing, and oral communication skills in a small group learning environment.  Prerequisites: Constitutional Law

Contracts - 4 units

This is a basic study of the principles that govern the creation, interpretation, enforcement, and termination of private agreements. Coverage includes formation and interpretation of contracts, breach of contract, defenses to the enforcement of contracts, and remedies available for breach. Attention is given to the Uniform Commercial Code and other relevant statutes. 

Contracts - 4 units

This is a basic study of the principles that govern the creation, interpretation, enforcement, and termination of private agreements. Coverage includes formation and interpretation of contracts, breach of contract, defenses to the enforcement of contracts, and remedies available for breach. Attention is given to the Uniform Commercial Code and other relevant statutes. 

Copyright - 3 units

A survey of the exclusive property rights given to authors, artists, designers, computer program writers, composers and performers under federal and state law. Emphasis is placed on the ability to advise both creators and users of data, information and creative works. Coverage is also given to related rights such a moral rights, and the right of publicity. 

Corporate Governance - 3 units

An exploration of the issues and principles related to an organization’s corporate governance, focusing on the interrelationship of an organization’s shareholders, directors and management. The course surveys and analyzes recent changes to organizations’ corporate governance structures and operations; the roles, duties and legal liabilities of an organization’s directors and officers; and the increasing federalization of areas of corporate governance that traditionally had been governed under state corporation law; especially on new federal regulatory developments.

Corporate Taxation - 3 units

An in-depth study of the federal taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Coverage includes formation and capital structure; dividends and other distributions; redemptions, liquidations, and reorganizations; elections under Subchapter "S"; and some special problems affecting professional corporations.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Corporations - 4 units

A basic course in corporate law, including the concept of the entity and its liabilities, management, promotion, financing, and organization. Coverage includes the issuance of shares, elections, and the proxy system; control devices and special problems of the close corporation; derivative suits and basic securities regulation. 

Crime & Punishment - 3 units

This seminar concerns the nature of responsibility as it is understood in both the criminal law and in philosophical theories. Criminal and moral responsibilities are distinct and the relationship of law to morality is complex. This course seeks to give students a better understanding of both subjects by thinking about them in a comparative context, looking at the similarities and differences in legal and philosophical approaches to responsibility. Among the likely topics of the course are: the significance of moral responsibility for criminal responsibility; the implications of current scientific research (neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology) on human agency for legal and moral notions of responsibility; whether skepticism about free will and moral responsibility has implications for the criminal law; and contemporary proposals for understanding the understanding the basis for the criminal law.

Criminal and Juvenile Justice Law Clinic - 6 units

A successor to our first in-house program, the criminal clinic remains a core component of the USF Law Clinic. Students enrolled in this clinic represent indigent defendants in all phases of criminal proceedings, from arraignment through trial and appeal. They also represent minors in juvenile court delinquency proceedings.  Prerequisites: Criminal Procedure, Evidence and selection by instructor.

Criminal Externship - 3-13 units

Criminal Externship Law Program gives upper-division students the opportunity to put their education in practice by working at law firms, legal departments, and public interest and government agencies for academic credit. See the Externship Section of the website for detailed information.

Criminal Externship - 3-13 units

Criminal Externship Law Program gives upper-division students the opportunity to put their education in practice by working at law firms, legal departments, and public interest and government agencies for academic credit. See the Externship Section of the website for detailed information.

Criminal Law - 3 units

 This course examines the basic doctrines structuring the state's punishment of undesirable conduct. Among the topics addressed are: the definition of criminal conduct, the defenses based on justification or excuse, the scope of criminal liability, and the relationship between crime and punishment. 

Criminal Practice - 3 units

This class will focus on the practice of California criminal law. Students will examine how prosecutors and defense lawyers actually develop their cases.  Procedurally, the entire time-line of a criminal case will be covered from arrest through appeal.  Practically, focus will be on pre-trial procedures and motions.  There will be practice of selected steps in the prosecution, including charging crimes, developing a case theory, preparing an evidentiary motion and writing in limine motions.  Special attention will be given to the unique ethical dilemmas facing prosecutors and defense attorneys at each step of a criminal case. Prerequisites: Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure

Criminal Procedure - 3 units

A critical examination of the law governing the method by which persons who are accused of committing crimes are processed through the criminal justice system.  Coverage focuses on the panoply of limits on the government and the rights of individuals under the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments and includes skills-oriented components to afford students opportunities to apply the rules in practice and to test the boundaries of criminal procedure.

Cyberlaw - 3 units

This course studies the emerging body of law relating to cyberspace, focusing on the Internet and online services. The course considers how to adapt law to cyberspace, looking at case law, statutes, and other methods of regulation. Topics include jurisdiction, computer crime, electronic privacy, free speech in cyberspace (including online indecency), online torts (including spam and defamation) and intellectual property in cyberspace. While prior exposure to cyberspace is helpful, no special expertise is required. 

Cyberlaw Seminar - 3 units

Through preparation of a paper and class discussions of selected books and law review articles, this seminar permits students to delve into the debates raging in cyberspace legal scholarship. Students will consider how hard it is to afford strong intellectual property protection online while maintaining a vibrant public domain, to ensure safety and accountability online while not intruding on personal privacy, and to protect vulnerable members of the community while not trampling on online free speech. The relationship of technology to law and to society is also considered.  Prerequisites: either Cyberspace Law, Electronic Commerce, or Information Technology Law

Death Penalty Law - 3 units

A course examining the law governing application of the death penalty in the context of the moral, social, and political questions raised by capital punishment. The course considers key issues, including the meaning and limits of the Eighth Amendment; attempts to enact constitutional death penalty statutes; jury selection; the roles of trial and appellate courts in the process; the effect of race in the application of the death penalty; and post-conviction review of capital sentences.  Prerequisites: Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure

Deportation Defense and Rebellious Lawyering Seminar - 3 units

 A seminar on “rebellious” or “collaborative” lawyering as well as immigrant rights and deportation defense combined with externships in local legal services programs or government agencies. The externships earn separate units administered and overseen by the director of externships. A major component of the seminar is case review and intensive casework discussion between the students and the seminar instructor.  Students will learn what creative public interest lawyers do—not just any creative public interest lawyers, but those who respect their clients (and even consider their clients as partners who share responsibility in addressing clients’ legal problems), who look for opportunities to collaborate with allies that can help resolve clients’ problems, who look for creative strategies—including through legislation or media work—to solve problems, and who are committed to learning about the socioeconomic background of clients and their communities with the belief that that education will assist lawyers in becoming better at their craft. Ethics is a theme throughout the course as well. Satisfies the Legal Ethics requirement.

Directed Research - 1 - 2 units

 A non-classroom course permitting independent and original research in a specialized area of the law under direction of a full-time faculty member. 

Discovery Practice - 2 units

 Utilizing pretrial discovery methods in a practice environment, students learn how to draft written discovery, prepare for and take oral depositions, prepare document requests, and use other discovery methods in order to prepare a case for settlement or trial. There is additional emphasis on expert witness retention and discovery.  Prerequisites: Recommended: California Civil Discovery

Domestic Violence Litigation and Ethics - 3 units

This course provides an in-depth examination of domestic violence law.  Students may opt to take the course with a concurrent domestic violence externship, although participation in the externship is not necessary.  Students may also opt to participate in the externship during a later semester. The three goals of the course are to examine domestic violence law from the legal perspective, from an attorney practice perspective, and with a focus on the ethical issues that arise from representing a client who has experienced domestic violence. Satisfies the Legal Ethics requirement. 

eDiscovery Law & Process - 2 units

 An intensive examination of the intersection of law, technology and practical issues involved in discovery in U.S. civil litigation and government inquiries. Focus on key procedural rules and decisions encompassed in this decade's ever-growing body of "eDiscovery" law. Topics will include: information preservation obligations; scope of data collections; legally defensible search methodologies; production formats; avoiding privilege waivers; and an introduction to proactive information-management policies. 

Elder Law - 2 units

Designed to equip students with a basic knowledge of elder law, which combines multiple areas of practice with the ability to work with elders and their families. This course will focus primarily on elder law issues related to estate planning, conservatorship practice, benefits eligibility, and elder abuse.  Consideration will be given to ethical issues, capacity assessments and blending theory and practice in the representation of older clients.  Prerequisites: Wills and Trust

Election Law - 3 units

This course explores the federal and state laws that regulate the political process and elections, with a focus on California law. Specific areas covered include the right to vote, ballot access, redistricting, the nomination process, campaigning for office, campaign finance, the Voting Rights Act, the role of the courts in election disputes, political parties, election administration and voting systems, bribery and related ethics principles, and ballot propositions, including initiative, referendum and recall measures. No background in politics or political science is required. Recommended: Constitutional Law. 

Employee Benefits (ERISA) - 3 units

An overview of pension, health and employee benefit law. The subject touches trusts, tax, labor, torts, insurance, investments, state/local legislation and family and estate law. Emphasis is placed on litigation subjects, such as denial of medical/retirement benefits, age discrimination, and fiduciary duty. 

Employment Discrimination - 3 units

A survey of federal law prohibitions against, and remedies for, employment discrimination, including discrimination on the basis of race, ethnic origin, sex, age, and disability. The principle focus is on Title VII, the Age of Discrimination in Employment Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, but California Law is also discussed. Among the issues covered are: the nature and proof of discrimination, justifications for discrimination, harassment as discrimination, the "reasonable accommodation” requirement, and innovative approaches in the field. 

Employment Law - 3 units

This course surveys the rapidly evolving law of the workplace and the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees. Its focus is on the developing legal limits to the traditional “employment at will” doctrine. Common law topics include implied contract theories, the covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and wrongful discharge claims. The class also explores the trend toward statutory regulation of the workplace by analyzing some of the federal laws governing specific terms and conditions of employment. The class also introduces some of the issues arising from the intersection between employment and intellectual property law, including employers’ use of non-competition agreements and trade secret protection. 

Employment Law Clinic - 6 units

 Students in this clinic represent clients in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission mediations involving alleged discrimination. Students investigate claims and prepare cases for mediation. As part of their preparation, students develop the theory of the case, determine damages, and write a mediation brief. Upon successful resolution of the case, students prepare a settlement agreement. In addition, students become involved in wage and hour disputes before the California Labor Commissioner. The clinic assists clients of the Instituto Laboral de la Raza, a nonprofit workers' rights organization that addresses the needs of low income workers and their families throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. 

Employment Law Seminar - 3 units

 Students explore advanced topics in employment law, as well as the process of writing academic papers. Each student prepares a paper on an employment law topic of their choice and presents it to the class during the term. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Employment Law, Employment Discrimination, or permission of the Professor.  Prerequisites: Employment Law, or Employment Discrimination, or permission of the Professor.

Energy Law - 3 units

This course will provide an in‑depth review of the basic principles of energy law, with a particular focus on the regulated electricity and natural gas industries. It will survey both federal and state law, and will cover important federal-state jurisdictional issues grounded in the Commerce Clause and Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Students will learn basic principles of the regulatory scheme in the United States, including cost-of-service ratemaking, modern market-based rates, and experiments (not all of them successful) with deregulation. A segment of the course will cover key developments in the emerging area of renewable energy.

Entertainment & Media Law - 2 units

A study of legal and business issues which arise in the creation, distribution and sale of products and services in the music, radio, television, news media, publishing, theater, and movie industries. Coverage includes components on sexual and violent content in entertainment and the law; privacy rights and defamation issues; celebrity rights; fair use; the implications of technological innovations on intellectual property rights in entertainment; artistic credit and control; and emerging issues in the creation and digital distribution of content. Prerequisite: Copyright Law, or Intellectual Property Survey. Prerequisites: Copyright Law, or Intellectual Property Survey.

Environmental Law - 3 units

An overview of federal environmental law and regulation covering the primary common law approach to environmental issues, nuisance law, and addressing the major federal environmental statutes’ role in land use, pollution control, and liability for hazardous contamination. The course we will focus on the following themes: (1) How does the nature of an environmental problem affect the crafting of the legal response? (2) What are the primary ways in which pollution control mechanisms are or could be structured? (3) What are the economic and efficiency implications of various pollution control and liability policies? (4) What are the fairness implications of various pollution control and liability policies? (5) How does or should environmental law cope with the problem of scientific uncertainty? (6) How have concerns about federalism been manifested in pollution control law? (7) What are the respective roles of Congress, the executive branch, and the courts in shaping environmental policy? 

Estate and Gift Taxation - 3 units

A problem-oriented survey of the federal transfer taxes affecting the gratuitous transfer of wealth during lifetime and following death.  The focus is on the federal  gift, estate and generation-skipping transfer taxes, with selective coverage of relevant income tax provisions.  Primary emphasis is given to statutory interpretation and tax concepts.  Examples of how these taxes apply in day-to-day estate planning and family wealth transfer cases are regularly discussed.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation is a prerequisite for JD students.

Estate Planning - 3 units

This course focuses on the non-tax dimensions of estate and end-of-life planning,  The course explores the basic documents needed in estate planning for different types of clients, primarily using California legal materials.  Students will prepare written submissions, including drafting model statutes, client letters, dispository instruments, and other written materials relevant to estate planning. Prerequisites: Wills and Trust

Ethics of Solo & Small Firm Practice - 3 units

Being a good lawyer requires not only mastery of the legal subject but other skills such as effective communication, client management skills, networking, and ability to generate business. This class covers the nuts and bolts of starting, operating, and growing a solo law practice. Common ethical issues that lawyers face are covered using real life examples. The skills introduced in this course will be honed throughout a legal career, in whatever type of practice chosen. The class analyzes and manages real world considerations that lawyers encounter every day.  Class assignments are collaborative. Satisfies the Legal Ethics requirement. 

European Legal Culture - 2 units

  Will provide an overview of the historical background of major European legal cultures and a comparison of different European courts and structures.  In particular, constitutional court differences will be examined, including those of particular nations, as well as the European Court of Human rights and the European Court of Justice. 

European Union Law / Topics in European Union Law - 2 units

European Union Law is a comprehensive overview of the structure of the European Union, its functioning, institutions, key policies and law. The institutional and legal system of the EU will be examined along with the legal framework of its internal market (including EU competition Law). The EU monetary policy (including the current Eurozone crisis) will be presented. Special attention will be devoted to the role of Court of Justice of EU and the effects of EU Law within legal systems of EU Member states. Focused topics in EU law are traditionally taught in the USF Law Summer Abroad programs and course descriptions are posted on the summer abroad webpage when offered.  

Eviction Defense, Ethics, and Litigation Skills - 3 units

The course will cover the substantive and procedural law of eviction defense; a variety of litigation skills; and ethical issues that arise in representing a client who is being evicted. It may be taken as a standalone course or in conjunction with an Eviction Defense Externship. Utilizing real cases and situations students encounter in their externships, the course will focus on the application of practical civil litigation skills in the context of the fast-paced eviction case.  Exercises in drafting, interviewing, negotiation, and other practical legal skills will be conducted throughout the semester. Satisfies the Legal Ethics requirement.  Prerequisites: Evidence

Evidence - 4 units

An analysis of the nature of judicial proof and a study of the theory and application of the rules regulating the admission and exclusion of testimonial and documentary proof by judicial tribunals in adversary and non-adversary proceedings. Consideration is given to both the California and Federal rules of evidence. 

Evidence - units

An analysis of the nature of judicial proof and a study of the theory and application of the rules regulating the admission and exclusion of testimonial and documentary proof by judicial tribunals in adversary and non-adversary proceedings. Consideration is given to both the California and Federal rules of evidence. 

Family Law - 3 units

A study of the legal and policy issues involved in the regulation of the family. The course surveys state and federal law as it impinges on the family, including issues related to marriage, divorce, child custody, spousal abuse, child neglect and abuse, nontraditional families, and new reproductive technologies. 

Family Law - 3 units

A study of the legal and policy issues involved in the regulation of the family. The course surveys state and federal law as it impinges on the family, including issues related to marriage, divorce, child custody, spousal abuse, child neglect and abuse, nontraditional families, and new reproductive technologies. 

Family Wealth Transfer Taxation - 3 units

(formerly, Estate and Gift Tax) A problem oriented course involving an introduction to the various wealth transfer taxes: the Federal estate and gift taxes and the tax on generation-skipping transfers. The course will also present basic estate planning techniques including inter vivos gifting and marital deduction planning.

Federal Courts - 3 units

A study of the role of the federal courts in the constitutional system, with particular attention to the doctrines of separation of powers and federalism. The course will consider the constitutional and statutory jurisdiction of the federal courts, the various doctrines permitting the courts to defer or decline jurisdiction, and the relationship of the federal courts to state law and state courts. 

Federal Income Taxation - 3 units

A problem-oriented introduction to the fundamentals of federal income taxation, particularly as they apply to individuals, including gross income, exclusions, deductions, assignment of income, capital gains and losses, non-recognition transactions, and income tax accounting. Emphasis is on the development of skills necessary for working with the Internal Revenue Code and issues of tax policy. 

First Amendment & Free Speech - 3 units

An overview of First Amendment freedoms: speech, press, and religion. The course examines contemporary theoretical approaches to understanding the First Amendment in several contexts including, obscenity, violent, hateful and threatening speech, Internet speech, artistic expression, defamation, privacy, advocacy and dissent, reporter’s privileges, commercial speech and anonymity, as well as the evolving religious liberty doctrines of nonedorsement and incidental effects. In each area there is an attempt to answer whether restrictions are justified and if so, the appropriate scope for such restrictions.  Prerequisites: Constitutional Law

Foreign Taxation II, LLM Taxation Course (Open to JD Students) - 2 units

This course builds on the material in Foreign Tax II.  Coverage includes the controlled foreign corporation provisions and other anti-deferral regimes, additional limitations on the foreign tax credit, transfer pricing, international sales of good, foreign exploitation of intangible property rights, and structuring of overseas ventures.  Recent proposals to reform international taxation will also be considered.  Foreign Tax I or the permission of the professor is a prerequisite for this course.

Forensic Evidence - 3 units

The course is an advanced trial advocacy and evidence course concentrating on the preparation and presentation of scientific and technical expert testimony. The course explores treatment of scientific and technical testimony by the Federal Rules of Evidence and the common law. Students take and defend expert depositions and argue pre-trial motions to exclude expert testimony or other evidence.  Prerequisites: Evidence

Frank C. Newman International Human Rights Law Clinic - 4 units

USF's innovative Frank C. Newman International Human Rights Clinic focuses on critical human rights issues, including child sentencing, the death penalty and prison conditions, the right to vote, and trafficking of women. Participating students research and prepare presentations for the United Nations Human Rights Council. Many of the students personally present their case to the commission at its headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, or in New York City to the Commission on the Status of Women. Students also work on briefs detailing international law standards to U.S. courts and represent individual clients before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Prerequisites: International Human Rights and selection by instructor

Global Administrative Law - 1 units

This course explores emerging global and transnational regulatory schemes covering matters such as security, environment, finance, telecommunications, intellectual property, immigration and asylum space. The course will explore the legal principles governing these regulations, actors involved in creating them, as well as their implementation and enforcement. Consideration is given to consequences for democracy, participation and legitimacy of governance.

Guerilla Lawyering - 1 units

This seminar/skills class focuses on lawyering for social change.  It teaches the art of using guerrilla fighting techniques in the legal arena.  Guerrilla lawyers are characterized by limited resources and by an alternative vision of the dominant culture.  The class first explores the lawyer-client relationship, then moves on to unmasking legal dogma.  Through role-playing we learn how to use the law as an organizing tool. There are two sessions in an actual courtroom at the federal building where each student argues a bail motion or sentencing hearing. Students learn how to exert power in formal legal settings.  The course emphasizes merging political/legal theory with practical lawyering.  The four themes of the course are: Dignifying the client; Building Power; Demystifying the law, and Winning cases.

Health Law - 3 units

An overview of the U.S. health care system with an emphasis on California law and including the recent healthcare reforms. Topics include access to healthcare, managed care and insurance regulation, Medicare/Medi-cal and other government healthcare programs, scope of practice regulation, provider licensing and regulation, approaches to improving healthcare quality, patient privacy, fraud and abuse, informed consent, public health responses to health crises and medical malpractice.

Immigration Law - 3 units

An overview of U.S. immigration and citizenship laws, including the statutes and the public policy contexts, regulations and judicial decisions. Topics covered include nonimmigrant visas, how to obtain and retain lawful permanent resident status, exclusion at the border, grounds for deportation, deportation hearing procedures, relief from deportation, administrative appeals, federal judicial review, asylum, and citizenship and naturalization. 

Information Privacy Law - 3 units

This course examines the legal protection of privacy. It explores the interaction of common law, constitutional law, and the patchwork of statutes that endeavor to protect privacy. Topics will include tort privacy claims, privacy of medical information, privacy and law enforcement, privacy and computerized records, and privacy at work. 

Insurance Law - 3 units

This course is designed to provide a practical guide to the application of insurance to everyday legal practice. The course focuses on understanding, interpreting and enforcing coverage found in commercial general liability, property/homeowners, automobile, and other types of insurance policies, and also focuses on the potential liability of insurers for bad faith and extra-contractual damages. Emphasis is on the function of insurance in civil litigation, business transactions, protection of property and personal security, and the role insurance plays in shaping, and being shaped by, public policy. 

Intellectual Property Seminar - 3 units

This seminar permits students to specialize in Intellectual Property by preparation of a paper and seminar discussion. Topic papers include advanced issues in all aspects of Intellectual Property law, from technical subjects such as patent and trade secret issues to trademark and unfair competition issues in marketing to entertainment law issues in the areas of copyright and the rights of publicity and privacy.  Prerequisites: Intellectual Property Survey

Intellectual Property Survey - 3 units

A survey of rights under U.S. state and federal law for the protection of new technology and inventions (trade secrets and patents), business symbols and literary titles (trademarks), and industrial design (design patents), and rights in works of authorship (copyrights) While the course focuses on American law, it will also introduce students to various aspects of international intellectual property law. It is highly recommended that this course be taken as a foundation to for the advanced study of intellectual property. 

Intensive Advocacy Program - 3 units

 A two-week summer program in which students study pre-trial and trial advocacy skills under the guidance outstanding trial attorneys from the Bay Area and around the country. The program includes approximately 80 hours of lecture, demonstration, and practice workshops covering interviewing, taking and defending depositions, pre-trial motions, evidence, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, opening and closing statements, and voir dire. At the conclusion of the program each student conducts a jury trial. All students perform individual exercises related to each subject and are given extensive feedback on their performance. Many of the exercises are videotaped and there are additional critiques of the videotaped performances. The program is offered each year during the first two weeks of the summer break.  

International Advocacy and Research - 2 units

Students learn international law research skills and apply them in preparing memoranda, legal letters, and advocacy materials for international dispute resolution and policy advocacy. Substantive law is paired with research, litigation and advocacy to illustrate how to build compelling arguments in a high stakes environment. Both written and oral skills are utilized within the legal framework of advocating in court or an international agency. Course developed skills will apply to a more generalized practice of law, as well as a practice that relies on international law knowledge. 

International Business Transactions - 3 units

This course examines the legal issues that arise when business dealings span different nations. The course begins with a discussion of the environment of international business, including an introduction to international trade law, the world economic environment, and international tax issues. Next, a series of representative transactions are explored, including export sales, agency and distributorship, licensing, joint ventures, and other strategic agreements. 

International Civil Dispute Resolution - 2 units

This course exposes students to the doctrines and skills of the international practitioner negotiating contracts, dealing with contract related disputes, and securing enforcement of transnational business arrangements for sales and investment. The substantive principles covered will include procedural mechanisms such as transnational service of process and taking evidence abroad.  Principal subjects will also include jurisdiction, forum selection, enforcement of foreign judgments and a major emphasis concerning international arbitration.  Students will apply the substantive coverage in skills exercises involving the drafting and negotiation of contracts.

International Criminal Law - 3 units

A study of the evolution of international criminal law from the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals, and their precedents, to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. The course will also provide an overview of the statutes and main judgments of the U.N. International Criminal Courts for Yugoslavia and Rwanda. There will be discussion of other experiences demanding accountability for serious human rights violations before national courts through territorial or universal jurisdiction.

International Development Seminar - 3 units

The course provides a broad overview of the theoretical and practical dimensions of international development and finance, including the development of large energy and infrastructure projects. The course is divided into three primary modules that will focus on: (1) legal and economic theories of international development; (2) risk, human rights, and environmental dimensions of international development and foreign direct investment; and (3) existing and emerging legal frameworks for international development.

International Economic Relations - 3 units

This course examines the legal structure of the international trade system. It considers the United States Customs and trade laws and policies impact on International trade. The impacts of General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the World Trade Organization (WTO), the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the movement of good within the European community. It reviews the impact of Tariffs and trade policies on the free movement of goods. 

International Environmental Law - 3 units

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of international institutions, an understanding of the major environmental problems facing the global environment, and insight into the difficult political, moral, and scientific issues facing the on-going development of international environmental law. Specific environmental issues to be considered include: air pollution, ozone depletion, climate change, water resources and pollution, hazardous materials, and endangered species and biodiversity. The course also considers the connections between international human rights and the environment, and between international environmental law and trade. There are no prerequisites and no prior knowledge of international or environmental law is necessary or expected.

International Human Rights - 3 units

An introduction to international human rights documents and the procedures and mechanisms available for protecting and promoting human rights. It covers regional systems as well as the United Nations human rights bodies. It also includes the use of international human rights law in United States courts, addressing direct treaty application, customary international law, and its use as an interpretive guide. Readings on how to conduct fact investigation are also discussed. 

International Human Rights Clinic - 5 units

USF's innovative Frank C. Newman International Human Rights Clinic focuses on critical human rights issues, including child sentencing, the death penalty and prison conditions, the right to vote, and trafficking of women. Participating students research and prepare presentations for the United Nations Human Rights Council. Many of the students personally present their case to the commission at its headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, or in New York City to the Commission on the Status of Women. Students also work on briefs detailing international law standards to U.S. courts and represent individual clients before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. 

International Intellectual Property - 2 units

A course in designed to prepare students for transactional work and litigation in an international IP practice with an understanding of some of the economic and cultural issues underlying IP law in other parts of the world. The course covers patents, trademarks, copyrights, unfair competition and trade secrets in the context of foreign laws and international agreements and treaties. 

International Taxation - 2 or 3 units

An introductory study of the application of the federal income tax laws to nonresident aliens and foreign corporations and United States citizens, residents and corporations investing funds or conducting business in the international setting. Consideration is also given to the impact of bilateral tax treaties and tax planning for multinational business enterprises.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Internet and Intellectual Property Justice Clinic - 3 units

The Internet and Intellectual Property Justice Clinic, in partnership with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, provides a variety of intellectual property legal services, such as domain name disputes in ICANN proceedings, copyright infringement notifications and counter notifications under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998, as well as other trademark and copyright matters. The clinic is also a partner in "Chilling Effects," a joint project of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and law school clinics at Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley, and Maine. Chilling Effects helps the public understand the protections that the First Amendment and intellectual property laws provide for online activities.

Internet and Intellectual Property Justice Clinic - 3 units

The Internet and Intellectual Property Justice Clinic, in partnership with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, provides a variety of intellectual property legal services, such as domain name disputes in ICANN proceedings, copyright infringement notifications and counter notifications under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998, as well as other trademark and copyright matters. The clinic is also a partner in "Chilling Effects," a joint project of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and law school clinics at Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley, and Maine. Chilling Effects helps the public understand the protections that the First Amendment and intellectual property laws provide for online activities.

Interpersonal Dynamics: Communication Skills & Emotional Intelligence for Attorneys - 3 units

Formerly: Negotiation, Mediation, Client Counseling: Interpersonal Dynamics for Lawyers.Students learn the skills essential to establishing, maintaining, and deepening effective relationships, increasing influence, and effectively resolving conflict.  At the same time, they also increase self-awareness, self-acceptance, and authentic self-expression. Most of the students who have taken the course have said that it had a profound positive impact on their lives. The important learning in this course comes from neither reading nor lectures, but from in-class participation. Unlike other law-school courses, participation does not involve theoretical discussion or legal analysis. It requires honest self-disclosure—sharing real-time feelings and thoughts with others and listening to others do the same.  

Introduction to Race Law: Policy, Professionalism & Practices - 3 units

This course will introduce and examine important aspects of the knowledge, skills and values necessary to support lawyers in dealing with race in the practice of law in the 21st Century.  Together we will closely examine important cases (e.g., Johnson v. MacIntosh, Dred Scott v. Sanford, Yick Wo v.. Hopkins, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Loving v. Virginia) that help construct race in America and construct thinking about its relevance to law and policy to this day.  Along the way, we'll explore and practice a range of self- and other-awareness skills that have been proven important to effective and professionally-appropriate service as members of the bar in the 21st century, including a commitment to practicing self-reflection and to compassionate and courageous examination of the presence of bias in oneself and in others.  We will also identify together and examine the principles, values and ethical rules that support ongoing engagement with anti-bias work in law, whether as ally, advocate, member in good standing or leader among our increasingly diverse profession and client population.  Satisfies the Professional Skills course requirement. 

Investor Justice Clinic - 3 units

In the Investor Justice Clinic, students represent investors in actions involving allegations of wrongdoing by securities firms and/or their employees. Students appear in arbitrations and other proceedings before the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) as well as the NYSE Arca (formerly the Pacific Stock Exchange). The clinic is officially recognized by the Financial Industry Regulation Authority (FINRA) and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Journal: Intellectual Property Bulletin - 2 units

The Intellectual Property Law Bulletin is a student-run law journal focusing on current trends in intellectual property law. The bulletin includes articles from students, professors, and practitioners on diverse areas of intellectual property law ranging from patents to cyberspace law. The bulletin also includes a survey of the cutting-edge intellectual property cases in the country.

Journal: Intellectual Property Journal - 2 units

The Intellectual Property Law Bulletin is a student-run law journal focusing on current trends in intellectual property law. The bulletin includes articles from students, professors, and practitioners on diverse areas of intellectual property law ranging from patents to cyberspace law. The bulletin also includes a survey of the cutting-edge intellectual property cases in the country.

Journal: Law Review Editor - 2 units

The USF Law Review is staffed and managed by students of the USF School of Law. The journal, which is published four times a year, serves as USF's voice in the ongoing academic debate regarding the evolution of law. Each issue of legal scholarship is comprised of articles by professors and practitioners as well as student notes and/or comments. All articles are subject to a rigorous editorial process to strengthen substance, polish tone, and ensure citation accuracy.

Journal: Law Review Staff - 1 units

The USF Law Review is staffed and managed by students of the USF School of Law. The journal, which is published four times a year, serves as USF's voice in the ongoing academic debate regarding the evolution of law. Each issue of legal scholarship is comprised of articles by professors and practitioners as well as student notes and/or comments. All articles are subject to a rigorous editorial process to strengthen substance, polish tone, and ensure citation accuracy.

Journal: Maritime Law Journal - 2 units

The USF Maritime Law Journal is a student-run, biannual law journal that focuses on legal issues arising out of navigable waters and includes an annual survey of Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals maritime cases. The journal is designed as a practical guide for practitioners to gain information on the latest developments in maritime law, including recent statutory and case law changes.

Judicial Externship - 3-13 units

The Judicial Externship Program offers eligible upper-division students to receive academic credit for positions as law clerks under the direct supervision of judges and research attorneys in state and federal courts. See the Externship Section of the website for detailed information. 

Jurisprudence - 3 units

This course, sometimes referred to as the Philosophy of Law, explores selected topics related to the concept of "law". Particular attention will be given to such issues as the meaning and possibilities of law; the law's authority as a tool of repression, a mirror of social values, or an aspirational agent of change; the role of judicial decision-making; the relationship of law and morality; and the meaning of the concept of justice. No familiarity with either jurisprudence or philosophy will be presupposed, though a great deal of material will be covered and some of the readings are intellectually demanding.

Juvenile Law - 3 units

This course examines the legal rights and “protection” of children in the U.S. legal system.  The class will focus on laws, policies and practices that impact youth in the juvenile delinquency and dependency systems, as well as the school setting.  Prerequisites: Constitutional Law and Criminal Law (recommended)

Juvenile Law - 3 units

This course examines matters involving children who are subject to the jurisdiction of the juvenile court or who may be accessing legal remedies in other forums, with a primary emphasis on California law and policy. The class will focus on dependency, delinquency, education, and civil law remedies available to youth. Prerequisites: Constitutional Law and Criminal Law (recommended)

Labor & Employment Law in China - 2 units

This course will provide an overview of the key areas of Chinese law, including civil and criminal law, constitutional and administrative law, and economic and financial law. It will focus especially on the framework of Chinese law in different fields: law-making, law-enforcing, legal profession and legal education. It also examines the legal system of China, form its cultural basis to the implication for modernization and China's participation in the international community.

Labor & Employment Law Seminar - 3 units

Students explore advanced topics in labor and employment law, as well as the process of writing academic papers. Each student will prepare a paper on a topic (of their choice) and present it to the class during the term.  Prerequisites: Labor Law, Employment Discrimination, or Employment Law

Labor Law - 3 units

This is an overview of the statutory, administrative, and judicial decisions in the field of employer-union-employee relationships and the collective bargaining process. Emphasis is on the National Labor Relations Act and the cognate legislation as affecting union organization, representation and employee rights. The course will focus on the nature of the labor and management in the global marketplace. 

Land Use Law - 3 units

Land is the focus of intense legal and social conflict. In this course, students learn the basics of land development and the regulation process (including zoning, planning, and subdivision law), with an emphasis on California law. The course explores contemporary land use struggles, including accommodating population and job growth, preserving the environment, providing affordable housing, and respecting property rights (“takings”).  Prerequisites: Property

Law & Literature - 3 units

 Lawyers are involved in a long term discussion of issues such as causation, moral responsibility and natural law. Sometimes the debate is carried on in jurisprudential, philosophical terms, but it has also been the subject of great narrative works of art. Shakespeare, Dickens, and Kafka, for example, constructed comprehensive artistic worlds in which these issues could be examined. Their work influenced other artists. Over time, artistic elements emerged which are now part of every lawyer’s world and work. This course examines artistic precedents which continue to define the life of a modern lawyer. Students will read Shakespeare, Dickens, Melville, Kafka, Shaw and Sophocles, and also consider certain modern films, including To Kill a Mockingbird. 

Law & Society - 3 units

This seminar examines the ways law shapes society and society shapes law in various comparative contexts.  Its sociological perspective starts with the belief that law does not simply exist on its own, independent of influences by people, politics, and social institutions.  Rather, law reflects the context in which it is made and used. Similarly, those laws have an effect on the people, politics and social institutions that are subject to them. Over the course of the semester, the course will explore definitions and concepts of law, the forms law takes and the fora in which it is shaped, the different ways that people understand law and the legal system, the ways injuries and disputes are understood and mediated, the goals and purposes of law, the limitations of law as a force for social justice, and the concept and importance of rights in a comparative context. No familiarity with Law & Society is presupposed, though some readings will be theoretically demanding and time-consuming.

Law and Philosphy - 2 units

This course focuses on aspects of law that raise philosophical questions. A primary topic will be the nature of judicial decision-making. Do judges (ideally) follow the law mechanically and perhaps exercise discretion at the margins, do they generally make value judgments framed by relevant legal standards, do they exercise great discretion and then use the law merely to rationalize their decisions, or do they operate in some other way?  More broadly, topics may include the nature of law, theories of adjudication, and whether traditional legal theories can usefully illuminate either one.

Law of Mass Communication & The Press - 3 units

An in-depth look at the legal issues involved in the gathering and reporting of news and other forms of mass communication. Among the topics examined will be access to court proceedings and records, Freedom of Information Act and access to governmental meetings and records, the reporters privilege against compelled disclosure, prior restraints, issues of tort liability including defamation and invasion of privacy, commercial advertising, and student press rights. The class will also examine the differential treatment the law gives various media and consider the impact of the development of both new media and new news reporting models on the applicable law.

Law of Settlements - 2 units

 This course prepares students for the most common outcome of any litigation: resolution by settlement. The course explores the theory and practice of settlements, including the fundamentals of settlement agreements, issues arising in complex matters such as class actions and mass torts, techniques for negotiating settlements, and procedures to enforce settlements. 

Law Plus Workshop (Optional) - units

Students will learn how to interpret their grades on their exams and to self-diagnose their performance. They should be able to track their performance to their activities during class, creating their course outlines during the semester, and their exam preparation strategies and techniques.

Law Practice Management: Understanding the Path to Success - 3 units

Designed to address the variety of issues which arise in the formation and operation of a law firm. The course will examine the intricacies of forming and developing a vibrant law practice, while complying with relevant practical and legal constraints. It will also explore accounting and taxation issues which are directly relevant to the business of practicing law, how to develop a marketing strategy for your law firm, how to hire and retain qualified and competent employees, and a number of other issues which will lead you down the path of success in managing your law firm. If you have ever thought of being involved in the management of a law firm (either your own firm or one with other partners), this course is designed to impart the requisite knowledge to you so you are able to do so with confidence.

Legal Analysis - 2 units

The primary course objectives include improving a student’s skills to synthesize course material into a logical, detailed and accessible problem solving approach, to critically apply the problem solving approach to hypothetical problems, to analyze and write a professionally reasoned explanation of the predicted outcome to the hypothetical problems, to  timely manage her or his performance of required task(s), to critically evaluate her or his work and the work of others, and to constructively recommend, apply and assess action(s) for improvement. Extensive individualized written feedback will be provided throughout the course. Each student will also meet with the professor at least three times during the course. 

Legal Drafting - 2 units

Lawyers solve problems. Legal Drafting helps students solve problems by working on the skills lawyers use in their practice. The skills covered include: 1) Legal analysis, the ability to apply the law to the facts of a problem; 2) Fact gathering in preparing a case; 3) Fact analysis; 4) Lawyering tactics, both in the handling of a case and in the drafting of a document; 5) Ethical consideration in decision making; and, of course, 6) writing well. In developing their skills, students will draft or rework documents such as memoranda of law, points and authorities, briefs, investigation plans, discovery plans, depositions, closing arguments, affidavits and statutes.

Legal Ethics - 3 units

 A review of the ethical principles behind the basic California and ABA rules through a discussion of actual practice problems. Ethical principles are introduced through these problems as they actually occur in practice as real-world ethical dilemmas. This course, usually offered in a seminar format, also emphasizes the practical and economic realities that can affect a lawyer's behavior, the tensions between traditional notions of ethical behavior, and society's larger sense of morality, and the conflict between the duty to advocate for the client and to act for the public good. Students may satisfy the ethics course requirement by completion of either Professional Responsibility or Legal Ethics and the Practice of Law. 

Legal Issues and Terrorism, Post 9/11 - 3 units

An exploration of the tension between national security and civil liberties by studying the powers of the President and the Congress to declare and wage war -- including the Bush administration's assertion of unlimited executive power and the role of the Commander in Chief; application of the Geneva Conventions and other international laws and treaties to the War on Terror; roles of military commissions and administrative Dept of Defense hearings, the detentions of “enemy combatants;” the process of extraordinary rendition; Military Commissions Act of 2006; court decisions on Guantanamo and on enemy combatants; Bush administration memos regarding executive authority and torture; changes wrought by a new Obama administration; and the onset of “truth commissions,” prosecutions of former officials, reparations and other means of accountability. 

Legal Research and Writing II - 3 units

A program designed to teach first-year law students to think and write as lawyers, focusing on legal analysis and problem solving, as well as on writing and research skills. In the first semester, students are required to draft at least ten assignments, ranging in difficulty from a simple case brief to a relatively complex objective memorandum of law. Students learn the following skills: understanding the legal writing and legal analysis process; applying the law to the facts of a particular situation; researching primary and secondary sources; organizing and outlining research materials; comparing objective writing to persuasive writing; and thinking as a lawyer. In the second semester, emphasis is on research (using both traditional research sources and computer assisted legal research), on writing longer and more sophisticated documents, and on writing persuasively. Students research and write demand letters and complex memoranda of points and authorities. Students are also prepare a brief and participation in oral advocacy exercises.

Legal Services for Children - 7-13 units

Litigation Skills - 3 units

This course is designed to simulate a civil litigation case from initiation of the case to trial.  It will focus on client interviewing skills and case investigation, drafting complaint and responsive pleadings, discovery including conducting of depositions, motion practice, mediation of case and trial preparation.  The course will be divided into plaintiff and defendant teams and prepare students for real-life civil litigation practice. Satisfies the professional course skills requirement.

Tax LLM: Federal Taxation of Property Dispositions - 2 units

An examination of the concepts and principles governing the federal income taxation of property dispositions, including: amount realized and basis, the treatment of liabilities, characterization of gains and losses, loss limitations, and nonrecognition transactions.  This course will emphasize rigorous analysis of the Internal Revenue Code and Treasury Regulations.  It will be assumed that students are generally familiar with the issues covered in a basic Federal Income Taxation course.  Tax planning techniques and tax policy issues will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Local and State Government Law - 3 units

Local government law, and its state law parent, both create and codify social consensus, however uneven, in the provision of basic public goods.  Not a single field of law, but a weave of thematically varied practice areas, local government law reflects and shapes the major fault lines of contemporary American life in a number of concrete ways. This course examines themes of gender, race, class and the economy as ways of understanding how local governance is structured and experienced. Specifically, the course surveys the law and politics of subjects such as regionalism and local government formation, child welfare, domestic violence, zoning, immigration, criminal justice, housing, voting, labor, environmental and administrative justice to look at the ways that difference is actively framed and managed by legal institutions. This course also provides a snapshot of themes in the law of public finance to illustrate the structure and financialization of regional, state and local economies. 

Maritime Law - 3 units

A survey of maritime law and the practices and procedures affecting today's maritime industry. Emphasis includes studies of admiralty jurisdiction; maritime torts to person and property; maritime liens and mortgages; maritime contracts, including transportation of cargo and marine insurance, the doctrines of limitation of liability, general average, salvage, and un-seaworthiness; and, the use of maritime remedies, such as vessel arrests and foreign attachment. 

Mediation - 3 units

An introduction to the theory and practice of mediation, the development of mediation skills, applications to different substantive areas, and emerging legal issues. Although the class will focus on the mediation process, communication skills, negotiations, and the spectrum of dispute resolution options will be introduced. 

Mediation - 3 units

An introduction to the theory and practice of mediation, the development of mediation skills, applications to different substantive areas, and emerging legal issues. Although the class will focus on the mediation process, communication skills, negotiations, and the spectrum of dispute resolution options will be introduced. 

Mediation Clinic - 3 units

 Students in the Mediation Clinic have the opportunity to apply dispute resolution skills by serving as mediators in cases brought to the San Francisco Small Claims Court. These mediations involve most areas of the law with the exception of criminal and family law matters. After intensive training, clinic students conduct mediations and draft settlement agreements for parties who are able to resolve their disputes. 

Moot Court Board - 2 units

Moot Court Case Counsel - 1 units

Negotiation - 3 units

This course involves the strategies, tactics, skills and techniques of negotiation. In addition it will include a basic introduction to assisted negotiation in the form of mediation. The learning takes place through numerous role-plays, as well as through the study of negotiation theory. 

Negotiation, Mediation & Client Counseling: Interpersonal Dynamics for Attorneys - 3 units

Formerly: Interpersonal Dynamics for Attorneys. In Intensive Interpersonal Dynamics, students learn the skills essential to establishing, maintaining, and deepening effective relationships, increasing influence, and effectively resolving conflict.  At the same time, they also increase self-awareness, self-acceptance, and authentic self-expression. Most of the students who have taken the course have said that it had a profound positive impact on their lives. The important learning in this course comes from neither reading nor lectures, but from in-class participation. Unlike other law-school courses, participation does not involve theoretical discussion or legal analysis. It requires honest self-disclosure—sharing real-time feelings and thoughts with others and listening to others do the same. For more about the course, see Rosenberg,  Interpersonal Dynamics: Helping Lawyers Learn the Skills, and the Importance, of Human Relationships in the Practice of Law, 58 U. Miami L. Rev. 1225   

Non Profit Organizations - 3 units

This course covers the regulation of nonprofit organizations under federal tax law and state corporate and trust law.  Topics include the requirements to qualify and maintain federal tax-exempt status; the formation, operation and governance of nonprofit corporations and trusts, including the legal duties and liabilities of directors and trustees; the legal status of unincorporated associations; taxation of unrelated business income; the limits on the political activity of tax-exempt organizations; the distinction between public charities and private foundations; and the regulation of charitable solicitation; and attorney general enforcement of charitable trust laws. Although the course will focus charitable nonprofits, some attention also will be devoted to other types of nonprofits such as social welfare organizations, trade associations, and social clubs.

Non-Profit Taxation - 2 units

 This course focuses on the tax treatment of public and private charities exempt from federal income taxation under Internal Revenue Code Section 501(a) by virtue of meeting the requirements of Internal Revenue Code Section 501(c)(3).  This course will analyze the voluminous requirements an organization must meet in order to be exempt from federal income taxation.  Additionally, this course will examine the following tax aspects of nonprofit organizations: the private inurement doctrine, the private benefit doctrine, excess benefit transactions, the public policy doctrine, restrictions on lobbying activities and political campaign involvement, the unrelated business income tax and common unrelated business activities, what it means to be a public charity vs. a private foundation, what constitutes a valid exempt purpose, and the rules surrounding the acceptance of tax-deductible charitable contributions.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Partnership Taxation - 3 units

This course is an in-depth study of federal taxation of partnerships and partners. Coverage includes: classification of partnerships for tax purposes, transfers of property and services to partnerships, the treatment of partnership indebtedness, taxation of partner-partnership transactions, sales of a partnership interests, partnership distributions, liquidation of a partner's interest, liquidation of a partnership, and death of a partner. Prerequisites: Pre-Requisite: Federal Income Taxation

Patent Law - 3 units

An introductory patent law course which focuses on the fundamentals of patent law; patent infringement and patent damages; patent validity issues such as anticipation, obviousness, enablement, and best mode; and equitable aspects of patent enforcement, including the defense of inequitable conduct. Technical training is not required. 

Patent Licensing - 2 or 3 units

This seminar examines the basic elements of patent licensing transactions and is designed to provide the background needed to structure, draft, and negotiate patent licenses as well as limited purpose agreements including employment, consulting, confidentiality, and material transfer agreements. Students complete a series of assignments that will involve drafting several agreements.  Prerequisites: Patent Law

Patent Prosecution - 2 units

This course provides introductory, hands-on training in the basic techniques of patent prosecution.  It is designed to help students learn the process of drafting a patent application and responding to office actions from the various patent offices, with a focus on the US patent office.  Students will also learn about the day to day management of a patent portfolio, such as maintenance of patent prosecution files and the docket.  A technical background in the Sciences is preferred, but not necessary.  

Poverty Law - 2 units

This course is designed to explore the interaction between policy regulation and constitutional law in the context of Poverty. We will study the impact of welfare reform and consider the consequences of how the government regulates the terms of work and the family relations of those most economically vulnerable. We will consider how societal changes, social movements, public opinion, empirical data, and policy goals matter for both policy regulation and constitutional interpretation. We will study in depth how the Supreme Court has interpreted the Constitution when applying its provisions to poor people. We will consider whether and how constitutional interpretation relates to economic justice at home and abroad. Prerequisites: Constitutional Law, Seminar

Practical Litigation Skills (formerly: Advanced Civil Litigation Strategy & Practice) - 2 units

This course will address the skills necessary to litigate a civil case effectively from inception to conclusion. It is intended to supplement clinical trial practice and discovery courses by giving a comprehensive overview of pretrial procedure in state and federal courts. At the conclusion of this class, students will possess sufficient litigation skills to substitute for typical first year law practice training traditionally provided by larger firm employers.

Practice Readiness Boot Camp - 1 units

An intensive two-day legal skills workshop designed to help you bridge the gap between law school and legal practice. You will gain personal skills, practical skills, and business sense to help you succeed in any legal practice environment. The course will cover time management and organization; best practices for receiving, working on, and completing assignments; detailed time entry and billing instruction; marketing and social media; and ethical considerations. You will also learn substantive litigation and transactional skills in the context of real world assignments, learn about the varying levels of critique and feedback new lawyers can expect, and learn the best way to handle mistakes. And you will hear from experienced practitioners, who will discuss what they look for in new lawyers and what makes a successful new lawyer. This is a valuable mini-course for students who want to hit the job running in any practice environment.

Predatory Lending Law & Practice - 2 units

A course covering federal and state laws that regulate lending including the Truth in Lending Act, Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Civil Rights Act, and Unfair Business Practices Act. The class also includes practical training in understanding and reviewing loan documents, interview techniques, collaborative lawyering, discovery and motion practice. 

Professional Responsibility - 3 units

A course examining the Rules of Professional Conduct, the roles and functions of lawyers in society, responsibilities involved in representing clients, and the organization and function of the bar. This course uses concrete problems drawn from real life practice contexts to illustrate in a practical way the complex moral dimensions of a lawyer’s professional life. Students may satisfy the ethics course requirement by completion of either Professional Responsibility or Legal Ethics and the Practice of Law.

Property - units

 The core Property course introduces the fundamental concepts and principles underlying the legal system's allocation of property rights; defines the features of differing types of property interests (through the law of estates, future interests, and concurrent interests).; introduces selected issues in landlord-tenant law; introduces the law governing private agreements people make about the use of each other's property (through the law of easements, covenants, and equitable servitudes) and addresses selected issues in public land use regulation. 

Public International Law - 2 units

The course is designed to provide understanding of the distinctive character of the international legal environment, particularly to develop the perspective of the international lawyer dealing with foreign governments and their agencies. It provides a comprehensive view of the lawyer’s role in using the primary international institutions and principal doctrines of public international law, through analysis of contemporary problems. Coverage includes: jurisdiction, sovereign immunity, the act of state doctrine, law of the sea, trade law, international sanctions and the use of force under in international law.

Queer Legal Scholarship Seminar - 3 units

This course is intended to be an exploration of contemporary sexual orientation law as discussed in the academic literature; primarily law review and law journal articles.  It will focus on relevant constitutional law theory (e.g. equal protection, due process, and First Amendment rights) as well as family law, immigration law and other federal, state and local laws protecting, or discriminating against, sexual minorities.  In the process, the course will examine how social mores and changes are reflected in legal development and vice versa.  Students will discuss, examine and critique law review and law journal articles for content, style, structure, research depth and thoroughness, and effectiveness so that they begin learning how to construct good academic articles.  Students will then produce a research paper of publishable quality.

Real Estate Transactions - 3 units

This course will prepare students to represent clients in commercial real estate transactions.  We will investigate the legal implications of each of the key phases of every real estate transaction—letter of intent negotiation, purchase and sale agreement negotiation, due diligence review, loan negotiation, legal opinion preparation and closing escrow requirements to name a few—in the order they occur.  We will pay particular attention to today’s credit markets and the loan products they offer, as well as to California’s deed of trust practice and unique creditors rights laws.  Along the way, we will have guest speakers on particular topics of interest.  Materials will include case law, as well as actual letters of intent, purchase and sale agreements, due diligence documentation, title reports, loan agreements, escrow instructions and the like.   Prerequisites: Property

Regulation of Financial Institutions - 2 units

This seminar will offer a survey and historical background of the financial regulatory system as it existed prior to the crisis of 2008-2009. It will review causes of the crisis and proposals to reform and improve the regulatory system. Students will study various aspects of the financial system including evolving financial products, the role of credit rating agencies, derivatives, consumer protection and systemic risk. The focus will be for the class to examine and consider alternatives and develop recommendations.

Relationship Skills for Effective Lawyering - 2 units

This course explores skills and competencies essential not only to leadership but also to effective negotiating, client counseling, and working cooperatively with other lawyers (co-counsel, partners, and other associates). Objectives of the course include (1) developing advanced communication skills and (2) tracking interpersonal interactions. These skills can improve relationships and maximize effectiveness and power. Class attendance and participation in interactive exercises is essential. Course has significant overlap with Interpersonal Dynamics; students cannot enroll/earn credit for both courses.

Remedies - 3 units

A study of the types of relief granted by courts in civil cases focusing on three major topics: 1) damages, including a review of general principles of tort and contract damages; 2) equitable remedies, including obtaining and enforcing preliminary and permanent injunctions in both private and public controversies; and 3) restitutionary relief to prevent unjust enrichment, including constructive trusts and equitable liens.

Crime and Punishment (formerly Responsibility in Morality and the Criminal Law) - 3 units

This seminar concerns the nature of responsibility as it is understood in both the criminal law and in philosophical theories. Criminal and moral responsibilities are distinct and the relationship of law to morality is complex. This course seeks to give students a better understanding of both subjects by thinking about them in a comparative context, looking at the similarities and differences in legal and philosophical approaches to responsibility. Among the likely topics of the course are: the significance of moral responsibility for criminal responsibility; the implications of current scientific research (neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology) on human agency for legal and moral notions of responsibility; whether skepticism about free will and moral responsibility has implications for the criminal law; and contemporary proposals for understanding the understanding the basis for the criminal law.

Science and the Law - 2 units

Lawyers need to be able to work with science and scientists on a wide variety of matters, such as issues in environmental, public health, national security, anti-discrimination and intellectual property law. This seminar will compare the purposes and functions of science and law with a focus on the ethical commitments of professionals in these diverging fields, and address how lawyers can best engage with questions of scientific uncertainty, causation, and expert participation in legal processes.

Secured Transactions - 3 units

A survey of the law related to the use of personal property as security in both commercial and consumer credit transactions. The focus is on Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, with an exploration of the purpose and scope of Article 9 and the difference between secured and unsecured credit. Transactions where lending is based on tangible or intangible personal property are considered, including equipment, inventory, receivables, intellectual property, and consumer assets. The course examines creation, perfection and enforcement of security interests; priority disputes among competing secured creditors or between secured creditors and other claimants; and debtor's rights and creditor's remedies in the event of default. 

Securities Regulation - 3 units

An introduction to the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. The course focuses on disclosure obligations relating to the distribution and trading of securities in the United States. Topics include the offerings of securities, anti-fraud provisions, insider trading, and exceptions to the disclosure requirements.  Prerequisites: Corporations, Administrative Law (recommended)

Sexuality Law - 3 units

This course is designed to explore how the law pervasively regulates human sexuality. The primary legal focus is on interpretation of the constitutional protections of liberty and equality. Topics may include the Supreme Court's mixed legacy about sterilization, the shift toward protection of contraception and marriage, the ongoing abortion controversy, the public policy re-emergence of abstinence, the recent reversal on sodomy, the raging debate over same-sex marriage and parenting, and the conflicting implications raised by how the various First Amendment freedoms apply within the context of Sexuality. Prerequisites: Pre-Requisite: Constitutional Law

Sports Law - 3 units

This class is a general survey of legal issues that arise in the sports context, including issues involving labor, antitrust, contract, constitutional, criminal and tort law. There is an emphasis on issues relating to professional sports and the professional athlete, amateur sports and the amateur athlete, and international law and the athletes competing therein.

Startups and Venture Capital - 3 units

This course introduces students to the legal and business considerations in forming and operating startup and emerging growth companies, with a particular focus on venture capital transactions. It draws from substantive areas such as corporations, securities, intellectual property employment and tax. The course uses a simulated deal format in which students represent a new entrepreneurial client through a series of decisions and events as part of financing an early stage business.  Written assignments throughout the semester simulate the tasks performed by a junior associate in a transactional practice. This allows students to see the life cycle of a deal and to address issues often encountered as the deal progresses from inception to completion.  While the course focuses on startup and emerging growth companies and the particulars of venture capital investments, the substantive knowledge and deal skills are widely applicable to a variety of transactional contexts, both corporate and commercial.  Prerequisites: Corporations. Recommended: Securities Regulations

State & Local Taxation - units

 This course examines the fundamentals of state and local taxation, including an examination of property taxes, corporate and personal income taxes, sales and use taxes, and other state and local levies. State and federal constitutional limitations on the power of states to tax will also be covered. Specific principles of California taxation will be covered.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Street Law - 3 units

The Street Law Project operates in conjunction with approximately 25 Bay Area high schools and several middle schools and their respective school districts. Law students, working under faculty supervision, serve as student instructors and teach a course entitled "Street Law" which annually reaches 2,000 predominately inner-city school students. The program seeks to promote legal literacy among young people to ensure that they possess that minimum amount of practical, legal knowledge needed to understand the system as a whole and how it can work in their behalf. Law student instructors deliver units in Housing, Consumer, Family, Criminal, and Constitutional Law at their assigned school sites. They also participate in weekly seminars and research and develop additional material on California law to be used in their classes.

Supreme Court Seminar - 2 units

This seminar deals with the process of constitutional law-making by the Supreme Court. The course explores the nomination and confirmation of justices; the case selection process; and the adjudication of argued cases (studying the roles of the chief justice, law clerks and advocates) The grade for the course will be based on a paper and shorter pieces and upon regular preparation for, and participation in, class exercises. The exercises will involve students as members of the Senate Judiciary Committee deciding upon nominations and as Justices deciding certiorari petitions and then cases accepted for review. For the Court exercises, students will research, argue, and decide several significant fall term cases actually pending before the court at the time of the seminar.  Prerequisites: Constitutional Law

Tax LLM: Tax Fraud, Crimes and Investigations - 2 units

This is a practical and solution-oriented course designed to cover from beginning to end the investigation, prosecution and defense of federal tax cases.  IRS Criminal Investigation investigates potential criminal violations of the Internal Revenue Code and related financial criminals.  This includes, for example, tax fraud, refund fraud, abusive tax schemes, and international tax compliance and offshore tax evasion.  The course covers the frequently charged tax crimes, the modes of proof, prosecution policies and affirmative defenses, investigation and development of cases, government information gathering techniques, pre-trial issues such as discovery and evidence, trial and post-trial work, sentencing, ethical issues involving in representing a client, collateral issues such as forfeiture, and civil tax considerations (civil penalties).  The course is taught by using practical and challenging problems designed to highlight some of the key issues addressed each week.  Students will learn how to analyze a given set of facts to determine the critical issues and formulate a case strategy and solution.   Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: California Tax Appeals Assistance Program: Income Tax - 1-3 units

The Tax Appeals Assistance Program provides students with the opportunity to assist low-income individuals in certain tax disputes before the California Board of Equalization ("BOE"). Under the supervision of an attorney from the BOE, students assist taxpayers with state income tax disputes against the California Franchise Tax Board (FTB). Students participate in legal practical skills training by gathering evidence, drafting legal briefs, and representing clients in negotiations with the FTB. Students often have the opportunity to represent clients at appeals conferences and oral hearings before the BOE.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Tax

Tax LLM: California Tax Appeals Assistance Program: Income Tax - 2-3 units

The Tax Appeals Assistance Program provides students with the opportunity to assist low-income individuals in certain tax disputes before the California Board of Equalization ("BOE"). Under the supervision of an attorney from the BOE, students assist taxpayers with state income tax disputes against the California Franchise Tax Board (FTB). Students participate in legal practical skills training by gathering evidence, drafting legal briefs, and representing clients in negotiations with the FTB. Students often have the opportunity to represent clients at appeals conferences and oral hearings before the BOE.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Tax

Tax LLM: California Tax Appeals Assistance Program: Sales & Use Tax - 2-3 units

The Tax Appeals Assistance Program provides students with the opportunity to assist low-income individuals in certain tax disputes before the California Board of Equalization ("BOE"). Under the supervision of an attorney from the BOE, students assist taxpayers with state income tax disputes against the California Franchise Tax Board (FTB). Students participate in legal practical skills training by gathering evidence, drafting legal briefs, and representing clients in negotiations with the FTB. Students often have the opportunity to represent clients at appeals conferences and oral hearings before the BOE.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Tax

Tax LLM: Corporate Taxation - 3 units

An in-depth study of the federal taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Coverage includes formation and capital structure; dividends and other distributions; redemptions, liquidations, and reorganizations; elections under Subchapter "S"; and some special problems affecting professional corporations. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Corporate Taxation - 3 units

An in-depth study of the federal taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Coverage includes formation and capital structure; dividends and other distributions; redemptions, liquidations, and reorganizations; elections under Subchapter "S"; and some special problems affecting professional corporations. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Estate and Gift Taxation - 3 units

A problem-oriented survey of the federal transfer taxes affecting the gratuitous transfer of wealth during lifetime and following death.  The focus is on the federal  gift, estate and generation-skipping transfer taxes, with selective coverage of relevant income tax provisions.  Primary emphasis is given to statutory interpretation and tax concepts.  Examples of how these taxes apply in day-to-day estate planning and family wealth transfer cases are regularly discussed.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Estate Planning - 3 units

This course will examine various aspects of numerous estate planning strategies with a focus on related tax issues whenplanning or administering a single or married individual's estate. Issues addressed will include but not be limited to: the marital deduction and unified credit, lifetime gifts, testamentary and lifetime trusts, valuation issues, charitable planning, life insurance, use of entities, generation skipping and using non-California jurisdictions.  Practical considerations, fundamental estate planningconcepts and advance techniques will be discussed.  Focus will also include the new law and the paradigm shift between transfer taxes and income taxes, with California taxation in mind. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Federal Tax Accounting and Timing Issues - 2 units

 An examination of the concepts and principles underlying the annual accounting system of the federal income tax, including: the cash receipts and disbursements method of accounting, the accrual method of accounting, inventory accounting, carryovers, the claim of right doctrine, the tax benefit rule, deferred compensation, capitalization and cost recovery, deferred payment sales, loss limitations, original issue discount, and other time value of money issues.  This course will emphasize rigorous analysis of the Internal Revenue Code and Treasury Regulations.  It will be assumed that students are generally familiar with the issues covered in a basic Federal Income Taxation course.   Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Federal Tax Procedure and Professional Responsibility - 3 units

An examination of the fundamental principles of civil federal tax procedure and litigation, including: administrative determinations of tax liability, statutes of limitations, civil penalties, the ruling process,  tax collection issues, and professional responsibility in tax practice. The course will cover administrative  procedures before the Internal Revenue Service, tax litigation procedures unique to the Tax Courts, and  tax refund litigation in the U.S. District Courts and U.S. Claims Court. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Federal Taxation of Property Dispositions - 2 units

An examination of the concepts and principles governing the federal income taxation of property dispositions, including: amount realized and basis, the treatment of liabilities, characterization of gains and losses, loss limitations, and nonrecognition transactions.  This course will emphasize rigorous analysis of the Internal Revenue Code and Treasury Regulations.  It will be assumed that students are generally familiar with the issues covered in a basic Federal Income Taxation course.  Tax planning techniques and tax policy issues will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Foreign Taxation I - 2 units

This is the introductory international tax class.  Coverage includes the jurisdiction of the United States to tax international transactions, the rules for sourcing income and deductions, U.S. taxation of nonresident aliens and foreign corporations, the foreign tax credit, and the exclusion for certain taxpayers living and working abroad.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Foreign Taxation II - 2 units

This is the introductory international tax class.  Coverage includes the jurisdiction of the United States to tax international transactions, the rules for sourcing income and deductions, U.S. taxation of nonresident aliens and foreign corporations, the foreign tax credit, and the exclusion for certain taxpayers living and working abroad.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation, Foreign Taxation I

Tax LLM: Income Taxation of Trusts and Estates - 2 units

This course focuses on income taxation of trusts and estate (including both simple and complex trusts), grantors, and beneficiaries under Subchapter J of the Internal Revenue Code.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Partnership Taxation - 3 units

This course is an in-depth study of federal taxation of partnerships and partners. Coverage includes: classification of partnerships for tax purposes, transfers of property and services to partnerships, the treatment of partnership indebtedness, taxation of partner-partnership transactions, sales of a partnership interests, partnership distributions, liquidation of a partner's interest, liquidation of a partnership, and death of a partner. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: State & Local Taxation - 2 units

 This course examines the fundamentals of state and local taxation, including an examination of property taxes, corporate and personal income taxes, sales and use taxes, and other state and local levies. State and federal constitutional limitations on the power of states to tax will also be covered. Specific principles of California taxation will be covered.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

State and Local Taxation - units

This course examines the fundamentals of state and local taxation with emphasis on federal constitutional and statutory limitations on the power of states to impose various taxes. The course will focus on principles of corporate and personal income taxation but will also provide an introduction to other taxes levied at the state and local level, including sales and use taxes and property tax. While the course will provide an overview of state and local taxes across the United States, we will refer to California taxation for a reference point and a base from which to compare the laws of other jurisdictions.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Tax Moot Court - 1 units

This course allows students to participate, for ungraded academic credit, in the Written Work Product portion of the ABA Law Student Tax Challenge.  Each course participant is responsible for forming a two-student team to produce a memorandum and client correspondence on the tax consequences of a complex business-planning problem.  The problem generally is released by the ABA Tax Section in September, with a deadline of November to receive the Written Work Product.  Before the problem is released, course participants will complete an assignment and attend training sessions on writing skills and techniques of federal tax research.  Meeting times for the sessions will be arranged among faculty and course participants.  Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Tax LLM: Taxation Research - 1 units

An introduction to tax research sources and techniques used by tax lawyers, including: online tax services and resources, legislative history, administrative authorities, and secondary sources. The  course will also examine the tax legislative process and policy issues involved in the formulation of tax  legislation. This course will be graded on a credit/ no credit basis. Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation

Technology Contracting - 2 units

An examination of the practical aspects of negotiating and drafting contracts related to the technology industry. Each class will focus on specific technology contract provisions, with an emphasis on learning drafting, redlining and negotiation skills. Students cannot earn credit for both Contract Drafting and Technology Contracting.

Torts - 4 units

A study of the law of civil injuries, including the concepts of fault-based liability and strict liability. The course explores alternative bases of liability for the interference with personal and property interests as well as defenses and damages. 

Trademark Law - 3 units

This course will examine, in detail, the major areas of trademark law, including, the trademark registration process at the United States Patent and Trademark Office; the basic rules regarding eligibility for trademark protection under traditional trademark infringement doctrines and under dilution law. The course will also examine a number of defenses to trademark rights, including fair use, generic use, non- commercial use, and First Amendment Protections in this context. The course will also cover various aspects of domain name law, including the Anti-Cyber Squatting Protection Act and the dispute resolution processes promulgated by the ICANN. Finally, the course will examine selected areas of international trademark law, including the specific rules which govern geographical indicators which exist in many foreign countries. 

Transactional Skills - 3 units

This course introduces students to the basic work of a transactional lawyer.  Students will learn how to draft contracts, as well as how to interact with the principles on a deal.  Through a series of simulations, students will interview clients, draft term sheets, translate the terms of the business deal into contract concepts, counsel clients regarding risk management, analyze ethical issues affecting the transaction, redline contracts to reflect changes, and negotiate with opposing counsel about deal terms and contract language.  The goal of this course is to offer students a basic primer on the actual practice of transactional law. Satisfies the professional skills requirement.

Transactional Skills - 3 units

This course introduces students to the basic work of a transactional lawyer.  Students will learn how to draft contracts, as well as how to interact with the principles on a deal.  Through a series of simulations, students will interview clients, draft term sheets, translate the terms of the business deal into contract concepts, counsel clients regarding risk management, analyze ethical issues affecting the transaction, redline contracts to reflect changes, and negotiate with opposing counsel about deal terms and contract language.  The goal of this course is to offer students a basic primer on the actual practice of transactional law. Satisfies the professional skills requirement.

Transactional Trademark Practice - 2 units

In depth focus on trademark selection and clearance, registration, and counseling.  Issues to be discussed and studied include trademark licensing, counterfeit and parallel goods issues, and administrative litigation with the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.   Students will work in teams, analyze and provide oral presentations and written reports on corporate trademark issues throughout the semester. Emphasis will be on developing creative and strategic solutions to trademark matters.  A final paper is due at end of semester.  

Trial Advocacy and the Ethical Prosecutor - 3 units

 A career prosecutor and ethics educator will guide students into the promised land of ethical trial advocacy in criminal cases.  Students will learn to read police reports critically and conduct the key aspects of trial practice from jury selection to closing argument in real criminal cases. The sessions will provide a mix of instructor lecture/demonstration and student exercises. Class participation is required. Especially appropriate for anyone interested in criminal trial practice (prosecution or defense) or trial practice more generally. Satisfies Legal Ethics requirement.  Prerequisites: Pre-Requisite: Evidence, Recommended: Criminal Procedure

Trial Practice - 3 units

A course designed to provide experience in the litigation process. Concentration is on the strategy, tactics, and techniques employed by the skillful advocate. The legal rules involved in a trial are critically examined and their practical application demonstrated through student participation. Students who have completed Intensive Advocacy Program are not eligible to enroll.  Prerequisites: Evidence

Trial Practice: Civil Litigation - 3 units

A course designed to provide experience in the litigation process. Concentration is on the strategy, tactics, and techniques employed by the skillful advocate. The legal rules involved in a trial are critically examined and their practical application demonstrated through student participation. Students who have completed Intensive Advocacy Program are not eligible to enroll. 

Trial Practice: Civil Litigation - 3 units

A course designed to provide experience in the litigation process. Concentration is on the strategy, tactics, and techniques employed by the skillful advocate. The legal rules involved in a trial are critically examined and their practical application demonstrated through student participation. Students who have completed Intensive Advocacy Program are not eligible to enroll.  Prerequisites: Pre-Requisite or Co-Requisite: Evidence

Upper Level Writing Requirement - 0 units

  The Upper Level Research and Writing Requirement is intended to provide students with the opportunity to refine the research and writing skills learned in the first year, and to enhance the skills necessary to undertake writing projects on their own following graduation. Students choose topics, submit outlines, prepare and submit a first draft, and complete the final paper in consultation with faculty members in approved courses andco-curricular programs.  

Water and Natural Resources Law - 3 units

This course will explore the laws controlling the allocation of three types of natural resources:  water, forests, and minerals (including oil and natural gas).  This topic is vitally important  due to increasing shortages in these essential resources. You will gain a practical understanding of administrative and judicial approaches for allocation and management.  You will learn strategies to apply these laws effectively to address protection of environmental quality, climate change, and population growth. Recommended: Administrative Law Prerequisites: Recommended: Administrative Law

Water (& Natural Resources) Law - 3 units

An exploration of the modern legal principles and polices controlling the allocation of water among competing users: cities, farms, recreation, environment, and power. The course covers the regulation of surface water, including an in-depth study of riparian rights and appropriative rights, and groundwater. There is emphasis on the modern, public interest legal developments that are controlling water allocation today: the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act and the public trust doctrine. The course also covers water transfers, interstate and international water allocation schemes, Native American water rights, and the large public water institutions that control water supply in the West, including the federal Bureau of Reclamation. The course also covers the issues unique to California, including a study of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.  Prerequisites: Administrative Law (recommended)

White Collar Crime - 3 units

An exploration of the law of white collar crime, with an emphasis on the investigation and prosecution of white collar crime by federal authorities. The course is a mixture of substantive criminal law, constitutional criminal procedure, and application of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure.  Prerequisites: Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure

Wills and Trusts - 3 units

A study of the law of wills, intestate succession, and trusts. Coverage includes restrictions on testation, execution, and revocation of wills as well as creation, modification, and termination of trusts. There is also attention to the problems of will construction, probate and contest of wills, and fiduciary administration of trusts and decedents' estates.  Prerequisites: Property

Wills and Trusts - 3 units

A study of the law of wills, intestate succession, and trusts. Coverage includes restrictions on testation, execution, and revocation of wills as well as creation, modification, and termination of trusts. There is also attention to the problems of will construction, probate and contest of wills, and fiduciary administration of trusts and decedents' estates.  Prerequisites: Property

Work, Gender & the Law Seminar - 3 units

In this seminar, we will examine in a small-group setting issues related to gender and work and the laws that affect (and/or seek to affect) how gender is constructed, constrained, and performed (by women and men) in work.  Course coverage will include antidiscrimination in employment laws as well as laws that relate to gender in specific work institutions, such as the military, and those that relate to gender in institutions that set the stage for work, such as laws that regulate discrimination in education and membership in private clubs.  There will be an overarching sociological component to the readings assigned in the course.  The course will also emphasize development of writing skills.  Each student will research, write, and present an original paper on a Work, Gender, and the Law topic.

Wrongful Convictions - 3 units

This seminar examines: 1) the various causes of wrongful prosecution, conviction, and incarceration of the factually innocent (e.g., eyewitness misidentification, false confessions, perjured testimony, forensic fraud, police and prosecutorial misconduct, ineffective assistance of counsel, etc.); and 2) the various legal and policy solutions for minimizing wrongful conviction in the American criminal justice system. Prerequisites: Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure

Youth Law Center - 4 units