Hi! Did you know your browser is outdated? For a more robust web experience we recommend using Safari, Firefox, Chrome or Opera.
Brand and Phair_thumb
Inaugural Brand Pursuit of Justice Fellow Heads to ThailandStory
Clinic win by Katie Finch
Criminal and Juvenile Justice Law Clinic Student’s Investigation Helps Exonerate ClientStory
Cometria Cooper_thumb
Cometria Cooper Named One of National Bar Association’s Top Trailblazers Under 40Story
IAP 2014 thumb
Students Hone Trial Advocacy Skills in Intensive ProgramStory
Rocío Albarrán_thumb
Rocío Albarrán 3L Wins Prestigious Peggy Browning FellowshipStory
Michelle Travis
Travis Named Professor of the Year at Alum Grad DinnerStory
Graduates of 2014
Class of 2014 Celebrates GraduationStory
Tim Iglesias
USF Honors Law Faculty for Exceptional Teaching and ServiceStory
Alyssa Bussey
Third-Year Student Externs with California Supreme Court Chief JusticeStory

Law Students as Heroes

April 03, 2009

The USF School of Law's Investor Justice Clinic is receiving national attention for its work on behalf of small investors.

Cru Ulrich 3L (left) is handling Edward and Jean Marnell's case against Morgan Stanley.

The story, titled "Amid Downturn, Law Students Give Aggrieved Investors a Day in Court," in the April 3 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education includes interviews with Cru Ulrich 2L, Professor Robert Talbot, and Dean Jeffrey Brand.

Led by Talbot, students in the clinic represent individuals who have fallen victim to a host of costly investment and lending schemes. Cases are handled by USF law students who have special training in the field and work under the direct supervision of Talbot and several adjunct professors. In its six years of operation, the clinic has handled hundreds of cases and recovered hundreds of thousands of dollars for small investors. Now, as the economy sinks, prospective clients whose life savings have plummeted are turning to the clinic in increasing numbers. The individuals served by the clinic could not otherwise secure legal representation because their losses would be too small for a lawyer to take on.

Read the full story here.