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Faculty Book Offers Glimpse into Lives of the World’s Poorest

February 21, 2014

A new book by Assistant Professor Thomas Nazario sheds light on the world’s poorest of the poor who are among the more than 1 billion people worldwide who live on a dollar a day or less.

1Dollar Jacket

Living on a Dollar a Day: The Lives Behind the Faces of the World’s Poor, shares the personal stories of people Nazario describes as “forgotten.” The book documents their lives and struggles, offering a glimpse through stories and photos into the everyday realities of individuals and families facing extreme poverty.

In making the book, a team including Nazario and Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Renée Byer traveled to four continents, took thousands of photos, conducted numerous interviews and researched agencies around the world that aim to help the destitute. The resulting book, Nazario said, is a call to action.

Tom Nazario
Assistant Professor Thomas Nazario

“It’s so easy for us to get into our own very busy lives and the day-to-day things that keep us going and forget about all the people who have almost nothing and who have suffered so much,” said Nazario, who is also founder and president of The Forgotten International, a nonprofit that does poverty alleviation work in several parts of the world. “This book is an effort to remind the world that we have neighbors in this world who really could use some help if we would just get out of our own comfort zones and do it. It doesn’t take a Bill Gates or a multimillionaire to make a difference. We can all be philanthropists. We can all make at least a little difference.”