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International & Comparative Law

The globalization of law and law practice has made the study of international and comparative law an important part of a legal education.

The institutions and rules of international law have an important role in the U.S. legal system and the study of legal traditions and cultures that are different from those in the United States offers a critical understanding and deeper knowledge of our own legal system.

Traditionally, the study of international law has been divided into two areas: public international law and private international law. Public international law was concerned with the relations between countries, while private international law was concerned with transnational relations among individuals and business entities. However, this distinction has blurred as matters thought to be within the purview of public international are increasingly focused on non-state actors and developments in international business and trade are reshaping the relations of states.

The courses grouped in this cluster ground a student in both the public and private aspects of international law. They introduce legal principles governing the relationships of countries, such as the sources of international law, international organizations, and human rights. They also introduce the legal and business issues that often arise when a client engages in business abroad.

Curriculum

Basic courses are those which introduce fundamental concepts and provide the necessary background to pursue advanced courses in the area. Additional courses expand upon basic concepts and offer advanced study in the subject area. Related courses provide additional background or demonstrate how the subject area relates to the core concepts of another subject area.

Basic Courses Units
Comparative Law3
International Business Transactions3
International Civil Dispute Resolution2
International Economic Relations3
International Human Rights3
International Human Rights Clinic5
Public International Law2
Additional Courses Units
Asian Legal Systems2
Chinese Law2
International Criminal Law3
International Environmental Law3
International Intellectual Property2
International Taxation2 or 3
Labor & Employment Law in China2
Legal Issues and Terrorism, Post 9/113
Related Courses Units
Administrative Law3
Corporations4
Employment Law3
Federal Courts3
Immigration Law3
Labor Law3