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Organization-Based Fellowships

These fellowships are administered by an organization, without outside assistance. The organization sets and provides the salary/funding, the duration of the fellowship, and the scope of the fellow’s work.

Fellows do not need to develop a special project, and typically contribute to the existing work of the organization. Organization-based fellowships are essentially a temporary job with the organization. There is usually no expectation that the fellow will continue to work for the organization after the fellowship term ends. Candidates apply directly to the organization, usually with a cover letter, resume and references.

Examples of some organization-based fellowships:

  • American Civil Liberties Union Fellowships:

    • Brennan Fellowship: One-year fellowship at the ACLU’s national legal department in New York City. The fellow focuses on First Amendment cases.

    • Ira Glasser Racial Justice Fellowship: Fellows work to advance the ACLU's longstanding commitment to racial justice.

    • Karpatkin Fellowship: One-year fellowship at the ACLU’s national legal department in New York City. The fellow works on civil liberties issues with a focus on racial justice.

    • National Security Project Fellowship: Two-year fellowship as part of the National Security Project’s legal team at the ACLU’s national office in New York City.

    • Reproductive Freedom Project Fellowship: One-year fellowship to work with the Reproductive Freedom Project’s litigation teams.

  • Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights:

    • George N. Lindsay Civil Rights Fellowship: One-year fellowship for recent law school graduate to become familiar with civil rights practice by working at the national office of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Washington, D.C.

    • Thurgood Marshall Civil Rights Fellowship: One-year fellowship at the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights in San Francisco, CA, to enhance the fellow’s understanding of civil rights law, and to prepare the fellow for a career of promoting social justice.

  • Equal Justice Society Judge Constance Baker Motley Civil Rights Fellowship: One-year fellowship in San Francisco, CA, for recent law school graduate with zero to five years of work experience after law school. Fellow may lead new research, advocacy, coalition building, and public education efforts related to transforming anti-discrimination law and policy.

  • Equal Rights Advocates, Ruth Chance Law Fellowship: Fellowship based in San Francisco, CA. The fellow will serve as a staff attorney and oversee the Advice and Counseling Program, work closely with other attorneys on litigation regarding gender discrimination, and participate in public education efforts.

  • Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles: Two-year fellowship to assist low-income individuals in Los Angeles, CA.

  • Environmental Law Institute, Public Interest Environmental Law Fellowship: One-year fellowship position in Washington, D.C., working closely with attorneys and other professionals to advance environmental protection by analyzing existing legal tools, developing new ones, and helping to craft innovative approaches to implementation.

  • Business & Professional People for the Public Interest Fellowships: Public interest law and policy center in Chicago, IL, that has an organization-based fellowship, and is open to sponsoring project-based fellowships.

    • Polikoff-Gautreaux Fellowship: One year fellowship for recent law school and public policy school graduates to develop the experience, skills and network critical to a rewarding career in public interest advocacy. 

  • Alliance for Justice, Klagsbrun Fellowship: Law Fellow (lawyer with 1-3 years of experience) and Senior Law Fellow (lawyer with 5-8 years of experience) positions available in Washington, D.C. Fellows research and organize projects focusing in great part on raising awareness about the importance of the federal judiciary, and provide support to AFJ staff.

  • Juvenile Law Center, Zubrow Fellowship in Children's Law: Two-year fellowship where fellows engage in a wide variety of advocacy efforts on behalf of children in the delinquency and dependency systems in Philadelphia.

For more information on organization-based fellowships, please see our Resource and Contacts section.