CATHOLIC SOCIAL CONCERNS IN THEORY & PRACTICE 0128‑395-02

                                                        Rev. James T. Bretzke, S.J., S.T.D.

                                                       Associate Professor of Theology and Religious Studies

                                                          University of San Francisco, Spring Semester 2005

 

Class: Tuesdays 9—12 LM 357                                                                Office Hours: M/W 1—2:30 (OR by appointment)

Fax: 415-422-5651                                                                                                                                  Office phone: 415-422-5298

E-mail: bretzkesj@usfca.edu                                                                                                                                                             

BlackBoard Class web-page: http://blackboard.usfca.edu [access code is Jesus]

Course Syllabus (with hyperlinks): http://www.usfca.edu/fac-staff/bretzkesj/CatholicSocialThoughtSyllabus.htm

Fr. Bretzke’s  Theology Mega Web-Page: http://www.usfca.edu/fac-staff/bretzkesj/USFWebIndex.htm

 

Course Description and Learning Outcomes:

 

This seminar concentrates on how Catholic social teaching can be brought to bear on a number of concrete contemporary social issues in the areas of economics, social analysis, gender and sexual ethics, race, globalization, human rights, immigration, and biomedical and health-care issues.  The presentation of Catholic social thought will be grounded in the methodology of Catholic moral theology and explore how the particular resources can be used which come from the areas of theological ethics, Scripture, the traditions of the church communities, and the interaction with human experience interpreted in an interdisciplinary fashion through the social sciences including dialogue with other religious and philosophical traditions, including how these various traditions are still undergoing refinement, discussion and disagreement both inside and outside of the Catholic, Christian, and secular spheres.

In particular students will be exposed to a how a number of leading ethicians and guest speakers who come from diverse backgrounds, (culturally, ethnically, ecumenically, geographically) identify, conceptualize and respond to concrete ethical challenges and issues. The seminar is being taught in conjunction with the grant given for the Joan and Ralph Lane Center for Catholic Studies and Social Thought and the seminar’s primary goal is to help the students develop critical skills in reflecting and responding theologically and philosophically on a representative range of contemporary moral problems in light of Catholic Social Thought in both theory and practice.  This course can also be used as a McCarthy Public Service course component for graduation. 

 

Class format and requirements:

 

Given the topical nature of this course students should be keeping abreast of current events and related discussion through the news media (such as newspapers like the New York Times [available online at http://www.nytimes.com ]and news broadcasts such as NPR and/or the Lehrer Report [available on KQED radio and TV, Channel 9]).  Classes themselves will include guest lectures from experts in the field, occasional Power Point presentations as well as standard lecture, questions and discussion in the larger group, plus occasional small group discussion on the individual readings and topics.  Attendance at the independent public lectures of the guest presenters is highly encouraged, but given the realities of individual schedules is not absolutely required.  Students, though, should make a good-faith effort to attend these public lectures since they are designed to augment the class presentation by the lecturer.  Required work does include participation in course web-postings, plus a twenty-minute individual oral final exam, 2 written case studies dealing with real-life ethical dilemmas (a maximum of 4 typed, double-spaced pages per case), and a final research/reflection project done in collaboration with between one and three other students on one of the themes covered in the course.  Examples of the case studies will be provided in class in the form of an in-class “dry run” sample exercise.

 

Blackboard Practicalia

 

Since this course will utilize the Blackboard web-page at USF rather extensively the students should count on logging into the page and checking their e-mail several times weekly (daily if possible).  The students are responsible for maintaining an active and viable e-mail account, and keeping their e-mail address current on Blackboard.  Beginning the third week of the course students will be divided into three groups (A, B, or C) and asked either to post a question on one of the readings to the Course Web-Page, reply to one of the questions posted, or to read all of the questions and replies.  This will be done alternately, so that one week students in Group A post a questions and the next week they answer a question, and the third week they are responsible only for reading all the questions and responses (the schedule of the Group web-postings is listed below in the Weekly Themes section of the syllabus)   Each student is encouraged to read the combined questions and replies prior to class on a given week, even in those weeks in which his/her group is not assigned to do so.  Similarly, students are also invited to post questions, comments, and/or replies regarding the readings even if their group is not assigned to do so on a given week. The schedule works out that each student will do a question and reply to the Course Web-page three (3) times each during the course of the semester.  Each student is responsible for reading the course postings on a weekly basis.  An example of a question posting and reply will be provided by the instructor for a Week Two reading.

            Each student also will be asked to keep a confidential weekly electronic journal on the course which would include reflections upon the Service Learning experience, class lectures and discussion, the course readings, and/or the small group experiences of working on the final project.  This journal will be submitted electronically either via the “Assignments” section of Blackboard or e-mail to the professor no later than 9 PM on Sunday San Francisco time.  The journal entries themselves will not be graded and the length of the weekly entries typically would be somewhere between a few paragraphs to a couple of pages.  Only the professor will read the students’ journals, though if students wish to post reflections on the Discussion Board of Blackboard they are free to do so.

 

Final Project and Paper

 

The collaborative final project should be done in groups of between 2-4 students and will integrate a topic which develops further one of the themes of the course in greater depth (agreed upon in advance with the professor).  The project may be either a web research-based presentation or an investigative project on a debated ethical issue which would utilize student interviews and analysis of arguments employed, or to compile a “dossier” on one of the course themes, which in turn will be made available to the rest of the class either in an in-class presentation towards the end of the semester, and/or electronically via the course web-page. Clear examples of each type of final project will be given in class.   Schedule and time-permitting, the final project will be presented in one of the final two class sessions.

 

A Final Personal Reflection Paper of c. 5 pages, summarizing the student’s primary learning experiences in the course will be due at the end of the exam period.  This is not meant to be a research paper, but rather a personal synthesis paper.  It may be submitted online as a final journal entry, or as a separate paper.

 

Course Assessment and Grading:

 

 Three principal factors will be taken into consideration for the final grade for the course: 1) careful preparation of the assigned readings, web-postings, journal, final reflection paper, and active participation in each of the class meetings (40%); 2) final exam (30 %) 3) the two case studies (10% each); and 4) the final paper or project and final personal reflection paper (20%).  N.B.  Correct English grammar and style will be presumed in all the written work.  Please make use of the USF writing assistance center if needed.  Intellectual honesty is presumed and any plagiarism in either written work and/or small-group project will result in a failure in the course.  Since class participation is crucial to the successful outcome of this course, any student who misses more than 20% of the class sessions will most likely fail the course.

 

COURSE READINGS

 

REQUIRED texts to be read by all

 

NB:      See Reserve Binder in the Library for copies of the articles; books are on Course Reserve, and also should be available in the Bookstore or via Amazon.com

 

Books

 

Bretzke, James T., S.J.  A Morally Complex World: Engaging Contemporary Moral Theology.  Collegeville: The Liturgical Press, 2004.  ISBN 0-8146-5158-5

 

Merkle, Judith.  From The Heart Of The Church: The Catholic Social Tradition.  Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 2004.  ISBN 0-8146-5111-9

 

 

Articles [See Individual Weekly Assignments for the which articles are to be read for a given week]

 

N.B., There are often online versions of these articles, and if such is known it is indicated here.  Similarly, many articles are available through the library’s data-base subscriptions (such as Proquest).  Finally, a hard-copy is on reserve in a course binder in the library.

 

Required Articles

 

Aumack, Raymond D.  “The Jesuits Are Too Liberal.”  America (24-31 May 2004): 21-22.

 

Bole, William. “Tales of Globalization,” America (4 Dec. 1999): 14-16.

 

Bretzke, James T. “A Burden of Means.”  Landas (forthcoming);   Available on the Internet at http://www.usfca.edu/fac-staff/bretzkesj/BurdenOfMeans.pdf

 

Bretzke, James T., S.J., and Rodman, Monika.  “After The Choice: The Church’s Post-Abortion Outreach to Women.” America 181 (6 November 1999): 14-19.  [Electronic version available through Library Database (Proquest)]

           

Cahill, Lisa Sowle.  "Sex and Gender: Catholic Teaching and the Signs of Our Times."  Milltown Studies 34 (1994): 31-52.

 

Callahan, Sidney.  “Abortion and the Sexual Agenda: A Case for Prolife Feminism.”  In  Readings in Moral Theology No. 9: Feminist Ethics and the Catholic Moral Tradition, 422-433.  Edited by Charles E. Curran, Margaret A. Farley, R.S.M., and Richard A. McCormick, S.J. New York: Paulist Press, 1996.

 

Camdessus, Michael.  “Church Social Teaching and Globalization,” America (15 Oct. 2001): 6-12.

 

Catechism of the Catholic Church.  "Part Three: Life in Christ: Section Two [The Ten Commandments, Selections]."  [Various editions, such as Garden City: Doubleday Image, 1995. ISBN 0-385-47967-0]. OR available on the Internet at:

http://www.christusrex.org/www1/CDHN/ccc.html

 

Ferkis, Victor.  “Globalization: Myth, Reality, Problems,” America (19 Feb. 2000): 11-13.

 

Foster, Serrin.  “The Feminist Case Against Abortion.” The Commonwealth (September 1999): 5-6.

Fuller, Jon D., S.J., and Keenan, James F.  “Tolerant Signals: The Vatican’s New Insights on Condoms for H.I.V. Prevention.”  America 183 (23 September 2000): 6-7.

 

Glenn, William D.  “As God Intended,” America 184 (21 May 2001): 26-29. [Electronic version available through Library Database (Proquest)]

 

Greider, William.  One World, Ready of Not: The Manic Logic of Global Capitalism (Simon & Schuster, 1998). Selections include Chapter 2 (“The New Against the Old,” pp. 27-38) and Chapter 4 (“Gleiche Arbeit, Gleicher Lohn,” pp. 57-80).

 

Harrison, Beverly Wildung. “The Morality of Procreative Choice.”  Chapter 2 in idem, Our Right to Choose: Toward a New Ethic of Abortion., 32-56  Boston: Beacon Press, 1983.

 

Henriot, Peter, S.J.  Africa in the Age of Globalization: What Is Our Future?” Presentation at Conference on “Land and Globalization in Africa: Challenges for the Continent” at Arrupe College, Harare, Zimbabwe, 31 March 2001, pp. 1-12.

 

Himes, Kenneth, OFM, “Globalization’s Next Phase,” Origins vol. 32, no. 2 (23 May 2002): 17, 19-22.

 

John Paul II, Pope. “The Ethical Dimensions of Globalization” Origins vol. 31, no. 3 (31 May 2001): 44-5.

 

         .  Evangelium vitae.  Encyclical Letter on the Gospel of Life. [Selections] http://www.vatican.va/edocs/ENG0141/_INDEX.HTM

 

        .  Sollicitudo Rei Socialis. Vatican, 1987.  http://www.vatican.va/edocs/ENG0223/_INDEX.HTM

 

        .  Centesimus Annus.  Encyclical Letter on the Hundredth Anniversary of Rerum Novarum.  Vatican, 1991.  http://www.vatican.va/edocs/ENG0214/_INDEX.HTM

 

Kelly, Kevin.  “Conclusion: A Moral Theologian Faces the New Millennium in a Time of AIDS.”  In Catholic Ethicists and HIV/AIDS Prevention, 324-332.  Edited by James F. Keenan, S.J., Jon Fuller, S.J., Lisa Sowle Cahill, and Kevin Kelly.  New York: Continuum, 2000.

 

Lajolo, Archbishop Giovanni.  “Address of the Holy See to the United Nations General Assembly.”  30 September 2004.

http://www.vatican.va/news_services/bulletin/news/15372.php?index=15372&lang=en#TESTO%20IN%20LINGUA%20INGLESE

 

Mandle, Jay R.  “Trading Up: Why Globalization Aids the Poor” Commonweal (2 June 2000): 15-18.

 

Massaro, Thomas, S.J., “Judging the Juggernaut: Toward an Ethical Evaluation of Globalization” in Blueprint for Social Justice vol. LVI, no. 1 (Sept. 2002): 1-6.

 

Mathewes-Green, Frederica. “Perspective.”  The Plough (Spring 1998): 28-34.

 

McCarrick, Cardinal Theodore.  “Pastoral Letter on HIV/AIDS.”  Origins 33 (19 Jun3 2003): 81; 83-86.  Also found online in various places, including http://www.cathstan.org/news/05-22-03/2.shtml

 

Michelman, Kate.  “The Anti-Choice Stealth Strategy.”  The Commonwealth (September 1999): 3-4.

 

Prejean, Helen.  “Opposing the Death Penalty: An Interview with Helen Prejean.”  America 175 (9 November 1996): 8-12. [Electronic version available through Library Database (Proquest)]

 

Ross, Susan.  “Can God Be a Bride?  Some Problems with an Ancient Metaphor.”  America (1 November 2004): 12-15.

 

Ryan, Maura A.  “The Argument for Unlimited Procreative Liberty: A Feminist Critique.”  In Bioethics, 81-96.  4th Ed.  Edited by Thomas Shannon. New York: Paulist Press, 1993.

 

Smith, Ann.  “Where Cafod Stands.”  The Tablet (25 September 2004): 8-9.

 

United Nations Declaration on Human Rights. http://www.un.org/Overview/rights.html

 

University of San Francisco Mission Statement http://www.usfca.edu/mission/index.html

 

Vatican II Documents. Selections: Available on the Internet at: http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/index.htm

 

Wilfred, Felix.  “Human Rights or the Rights of the Poor? Redeeming the Human Rights from Contemporary Inversions.”  SEDOS Bulletin http://www.sedos.org/english/Wilfred.html

 

Wolfe, Naomi.  “Our Bodies, Our Souls: Rethinking Pro-Choice Rhetoric.” The New Republic (16 October 1995): 26-35.

 

Recommended Readings:

 

Bretzke, James T., S.J.  "The Common Good in a Cross-Cultural Perspective: Insights from the Confucian Moral Community."  In Religion, Ethics & the Common Good, 83-105.  Annual Publication of the College Theology Society, 41.  Edited by James Donahue and Theresa Moser.  Mystic CT: Twenty-Third Publications, 1996.

 

        . “Human Rights or Human Rites?: A Confucian Cross-Cultural Perspective.”  East Asian Pastoral Review 41/1 (2004): 44-67.  Also available online at http://eapi.admu.edu.ph/eapr004/bretzke.htm

 

Cahill, Lisa Sowle.  "Catholic Sexual Ethics and the Dignity of the Person: A Double Message."  Theological Studies 50 (1989): 120-150.

 

Callahan, Daniel.  "An Ethical Challenge to Prochoice Advocates:  Abortion and the Pluralistic Proposition."  In Bioethics, 21-35.  Edited by Thomas A. Shannon.  4th Edition.  New York: Paulist Press, 1993.

 

Article originally appeared in Commonweal 117 (23 November 1990): 681-687.

 

Callahan, Daniel.  "The Sanctity of Life Seduced: A Symposium on Medical Ethics."  First Things (April 1994): 13-15.

 

National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB).  “Always our Children.  Pastoral Message to Parents of Homosexual Children and Suggestions for Pastoral Ministers.” Origins 27 (9 October 1997): 285; 287-291.  Revised version: Origins 28 (2 July 1998): 97;99-112.  Also available on the Internet at: http://www.usccb.org/laity/always.htm

Other recommended readings and handouts will be suggested throughout the course, and students are also encouraged to suggest readings and/or post links to the course web-page.

 

WEEKLY THEMES, READINGS AND ASSIGNMENTS

 

WEEK 1 (January 25) Introduction, Methodology of 6 C’ Modes of Moral Discourse and Moral Triangle

 

            Read

            Aumack, Raymond D.  “The Jesuits Are Too Liberal.” 

            Bretzke, Morally Complex World, Chapters 1, 5        

                Lajolo, Archbishop Giovanni.  “Address of the Holy See to the UN General Assembly

 

Six C’s of Moral Discourse and the Moral Triangle Power Point Presentation

                http://www.usfca.edu/fac-staff/bretzkesj/6CsMoralTriangleWar.htm

 

WEEK 2 (February 1) Social Ethics Introduction; Social Justice and the Common Good

 

            Guest Lecturer:  Jerome Baggett, Graduate Theological Union

            Producing Catholic Social Thought: Interpreting the “Supply” and “Demand” Sides of the Equation”

 

Read: Merkle, Chs. 1-4 [“Foundations”]

            University of San Francisco Mission Statement http://www.usfca.edu/mission/index.html

           

WEEK 3 (February 8) Ethical Theories and Moral Normativity; Scripture & Ethics

 

Bring a Bible to class (ideally, NOT the RSV or NRSV translations)

 

Read: Bretzke, Morally Complex World, Chapter 2, 3, 4, 6

 

Web-Page Question/Replies begins: Each person in Group A posts a one question to one of the assigned readings ; Each person in Group B posts a reply to one of the questions posted by Group A; Group C reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

Ethical Theories Introduction Power Point Presentation

                http://www.usfca.edu/fac-staff/bretzkesj/EthicalTheoriesIntro.htm

 

WEEK 4 (February 15) Social Analysis and African Case Study

 

Guest Lecturer: Peter Henriot, S.J. Africa

“Catholic Social Thought and African Public Policy”

 

Read:

Henriot,  Africa in the Age of Globalization: What Is Our Future?”

Catechism of the Catholic Church, "Part Three: Life in Christ" Section Two, Ch. 2, Articles 4, 5, 7, 8, 10.    

John Paul II, Sollicitudo Rei Socialis

 

Web-Page Question/Replies: Each person in Group B posts a one question to one of the assigned readings; Each person in Group C posts a reply to one of the questions posted by Group B; Group A reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

N.B. Power Point presentations used in this and subsequent weeks of the semester will be posted on the USF Server after each week’s class.  The URL can be found in the External Links Section of Blackboard and/or Fr. Bretzke’s Theology Web-Page.

 

WEEK 5 (February 22)           Sexual Ethics, Gender, Economics, and Homosexuality

 

Guest Lecturer: Susan Ross, Loyola University Chicago

            “Sexual Ethics and Gender”

 

Read

Cahill, "Sex and Gender: Catholic Teaching and the Signs of Our Times.”

Catechism of the Catholic Church, "Part Three: Life in Christ" Section Two, Ch. 2, Articles 6, 9.

Glenn, William D.  “As God Intended,” America 184 (21 May 2001): 26-29.

Ross, Susan.  “Can God Be a Bride?”  America (1 November 2004): 12-15.

Vatican II, Gaudium et spes, Ch. 1, #47-52.

 

Recommended Reading:

Cahill, "Catholic Sexual Ethics and the Dignity of the Person”;

National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB).  “Always our Children.”

 

Web-Page Question/Replies: Group C posts a question each; Group A posts a reply each to one of the questions posted by Group C; Group B reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

WEEK 6 (March 1)     Race and Class in the Church and Society

 

            Guest Lecturer:  Jeanette Rodriguez , Seattle University

            “Race & Class in the Church and Society”

 

            Read Merkle, Chs. 5-6

 

Web-Page Question/Replies: Each person in Group A posts a one question to one of the assigned readings ; Each person in Group B posts a reply to one of the questions posted by Group A; Group C reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

WEEK 7 (March 8)     Globalization and Economic Global Justice

 

            Guest Lecturer: Thomas Massaro, S.J., Weston Jesuit School of Theology

            “Globalization & Economic Justice”

 

Read [all short articles of a few pages, plus two short book chapters, for a total of 64 pages]

Bole, “Tales of Globalization”

Camdessus, “Church Social Teaching and Globalization.”

Greider, William.  One World, Ready of Not:  pp. 27-38 and pp. 57-80.

Himes, OFM, “Globalization’s Next Phase.”

John Paul II, Pope. “The Ethical Dimensions of Globalization.”

Mandle, “Trading Up: Why Globalization Aids the Poor.”

Massaro, S.J., “Judging the Juggernaut: Toward an Ethical Evaluation of Globalization.”

 

Recommended Reading

 

Web-Page Question/Replies: Each person in Group B posts a one question to one of the assigned readings ; Each person in Group C posts a reply to one of the questions posted by Group B; Group A reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

WEEK 8 (March 15)   HIV/AIDS in a Global Context

 

            Read Fuller and Keenan, “Tolerant Signals”

            Kelly, “Conclusion: A Moral Theologian Faces the New Millennium in a Time of AIDS.”

            McCarrick, “Pastoral Letter on HIV/AIDS”

            Smith, “Where Cafod Stands” [Condoms and HIV Prevention]

 

First Case Study Due Friday March 18th at midnight (if sent electronically); OTHERWISE it is due in Class on Tuesday March 15th

 

No Required Web Questions or Journal Reflections this Week!

 

SPRING BREAK (HOLY WEEK) NO CLASS ON MARCH 22ND

 

WEEK 9 (March 29)   Bioethics, Stem Cell Research, and End-of-Life Issues

 

            Guest Lecturer : Al Jonsen Co-Director, Program in Medicine and Human Values California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco

            An Evolving Moral Paradigm: From Mutilation to Donation. Catholic Theology, Organ Transplantation and Public Policy”

 

Read

Catechism of the Catholic Church, "Part Three: Life in Christ" Section Two, Ch. 2, Art.

Bretzke, “A Burden of Means”

John Paul II, Pope.  Evangelium vitae, Ch. 3 Pt. 2 (#58-78)

           

Recommended Reading:

Callahan, Daniel.  "The Sanctity of Life Seduced”

 

Web-Page Question/Replies: Each person in Group C posts a one question to one of the assigned readings ; Each person in Group A posts a reply to one of the questions posted by Group C; Group B reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

WEEK 10 (April 5)     The Church as Moral Teacher: Capital Punishment and War and Peace

 

            Guest Lecturers Archbishop Levada and Rev. Stephen Barber, S.J., Chaplain San Quentin State Prison

 

Read

John Paul II, Evangelium vitae, Ch. 3, #52-56.

Merkle, Ch. 7

Prejean, “Opposing the Death Penalty: An Interview with Helen Prejean.”

 

Web-Page Question/Replies: Group A posts a question each; Group B posts a reply each to one of the questions posted by Group A; Group C reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

WEEK 11 (April 12)   Homelessness as a Test Case For Economic Justice for All

 

            Read:

Merkle, Ch. 8-10

John Paul II Centesimus Annus

 

Web-Page Question/Replies: Each person in Group B posts a one question to one of the assigned readings ; Each person in Group C posts a reply to one of the questions posted by Group B; Group A reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

WEEK 12 (April 19)   Abortion

 

Possible Guest Lecturer [Monika Rodman and/or After the Choice Alum?]

 

Read

Bretzke/Rodman, “After The Choice”

Callahan, Sidney,  “Abortion and the Sexual Agenda: A Case for Prolife Feminism.”

Foster, “The Feminist Case Against Abortion.”

Harrison, “The Morality of Procreative Choice.”

John Paul II, Pope.  Evangelium vitae, Ch. 3, #58-62; 73; 99.

Mathewes-Green, Frederica. “Perspective.”

Michelman, “The Anti-Choice Stealth Strategy.”

Wolfe, “Our Bodies, Our Souls”

 

Recommended Reading:

Callahan, Daniel "An Ethical Challenge to Prochoice Advocates” In Bioethics, 21-35.

 

Web-Page Question/Replies: Each person in Group C posts a one question to one of the assigned readings ; Each person in Group A posts a reply to one of the questions posted by Group C; Group B reads all the questions and replies.  Post the Questions by Friday at 9 PM and the Replies by Sunday at 9 PM.

 

WEEK 13 (April 26)   Reproductive Rights and Catholic Social Teaching

 

            Guest Lecturer Maura Ryan, University of Notre Dame

            "Whose Holy Grail? Justice and Health Care in the Age of Genetics."

 

Read

Ryan, Maura A.  “The Argument for Unlimited Procreative Liberty


 

            [No Further Required Web-Questions; Last Required Journal Entry]

 

WEEK 14 (May 3)      Human Rights In Cross-Cultural Perspective  & Dossier/Project Student Presentations

 

            Read

            Merkle, Ch. 11

United Nations Declaration on Human Rights.

Wilfred,  “Human Rights or the Rights of the Poor?”

 

Recommended Reading

Bretzke, “Common Good in a Confucian Perspective.”


Bretzke, “Human Rights or Human Rites?”

 

[No further mandatory Journal entries or Web-Questions are required; they are, however, optional if you wish]

 

            Second Case Study Due Friday May 6th at midnight (if sent electronically); OTHERWISE it is due in Class on Tuesday May 3rd.

 

WEEK 15 (May 10)    Dossier/Project Student Presentations & Course Evaluation

 

Final Individual Oral Exam Period May 12th-18th:

 

Individual reflection papers are due on Friday May 13th at midnight if sent electronically; otherwise they are due in Father Bretzke’s box in the Theology Department OR Loyola House by Friday May 13th at 5 PM.