Film Screening: Hafu
Film Screening: Hafu
September 17, 2014
5 - 6:30 p.m.
Fromm Hall, Xavier 
more info »
Bridging the Pacific

2011 Events Archive

Tuesday - December 13, 2011 - 5:45 PM

USF Main Campus, McLaren Complex 
Enter from Golden Gate Street between Chabot and Kittredge

romer2Healing America’s Troubled Economy
The Fall 2011 Y.L. Wu Lecture delivered by Christina Romer, Ph.D., UC Berkeley (UC Berkeley and Former Chair, Council of Economic Advisers), and David H. Romer, Ph.D., (Herman Royer Professor of Political Economy, UC Berkeley)

The Great Recession has set in for the duration. Wall Street survived; Main Street collapsed. Banks are flush, individuals are saving, no one is spending, or creating jobs in an economy on life support. As a senior White House adviser, Christina Romer tried to help President Obama find solutions. What went wrong? What comes next? Come hear.... 

Patrick L. Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Presented by the USF Center for the Pacific RIm and the USF Economics Department. Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California.



Thursday - December 1, 2011 - 5:45 PM 
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

ice2Empire of Ice
A visual presentation and book signing by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson

Antarctica rises near the southern curve of the Pacific Rim, and this December marks its centenary as a continent; before that explorers thought it either floating sea-ice or an island chain like Indonesia.  One of the leading historians of science, Professor Larson tells the stormy, sometimes smelly story in Empire of Ice.  Sailing from bases in Tasmania, British engineers mined tons of penguin guana to fertilize Australia and New Zealand, and from Norway came Amundsen who, using dog sleds, raced all comers to the South Pole—and won—while US teams raced to the North Pole.  Brits lost at both ends, having to eat their dead dogs wo survive.  And Chile contested Britain's colonial claims to the continent, especially after this freezing "southern ocean" was found to host one of the globe's richest fisheries.  Then came World War I and World War II Germans!  Did the Nazis try to build a secret base here?  Some feared so!  Today oil and gas reserves attract a fuel-hungry world.

Patrick L. Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.  For reservations please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the USF Biology Department, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



Tuesday - November 15, 2011 - 5:45 PM 
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

mahaMaharaja
A visual presentation by Qamar Adamjee, Assistant Curator of South Asian Art, Asian Art Museum

While Maharajah came to be used as a generic term for all India’s “great kings”, their later British imperial rulers reduced their titles to “native princes”. But the royal courts of these princes continued to reflect their splendor, much of which glows from the 200 spectacular works of art now at The Asian Art Museum. 

The exhibit is much more than the fabled Cartier jewelry or the Patiala necklace; it goes beyond the artifacts to analyze the roles and qualities of Indian kingship and its shifting nature over time. Join Ms. Adamjee for a detailed exploration of these wonders and the world that created them...

Patrick L. Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California, The Asian Art Museum, the USF Department of Art+Architecture, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



Thursday - November 10, 2011 - 5:45 PM 
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

nachtCyber Security
An interview with Michael Nacht, Ph.D., former Assistant Secretary of Defense

Espionage agents spy on industrial and commercial as well as defense and diplomatic targets and computer hackers have now replaced James Bond in this new world order. Professor Michael Nacht of UC Berkeley, President Obama’s Assistant Secretary of Defense up to last year, knows the dangers. Nacht has had three tours of government service and participated in five summit meetings with President Clinton—four with Russia’s Boris Yeltsin and one with China’s Jiang Zemin. A Columbia Ph.D. in Politics, he co-founded the journal International Security while at Harvard’s Kennedy School (1973-1984). At UC Berkeley he served ten years as Dean of the Graduate School of Public Policy. Some specialists predict a future cyber war between China and the U.S. Come hear Dr. Nacht’s views. 

Patrick L. Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828. 

Cosponsored by the USF Computer Science Department, the USF Economics Department, and the Bay Area Council.



Friday - October 28, 2011 - 4:00 to 5:30 PM (NOTE EARLY START TIME)
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall, Meir Room 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

nexisThe China-Hong Kong Nexus: Another Look at China's Twelfth Five-Year Plan
A talk by Yue Chim Richard Wong, Ph.D., Philip Wong Kennedy Wong Professor in Political Economy, The University of Hong Kong

China's Twelfth Five-Year Plan, approved in March 2011 by the National People's Congress, defines the guiding principles of promoting the country's “inclusive growth” in the next five years,  intended to ensure that the benefits of economic growth are spread to a greater proportion of China’s citizens. The plan’s key themes are rebalancing the economy, ameliorating social inequality, and protecting the environment. It also sets out key targets for development in various areas, including economic co-operation between Hong Kong and Mainland China. Professor Wong will examine the critical role of Hong Kong in regional and national economic development from the perspective of institutional change and innovation. 

Dr. Yue Chim Richard Wong (AB, AM, PhD in Economics, Chicago) is Professor of Economics and the Philip Wong Kennedy Wong Professor in Political Economy at The University of Hong Kong.  He was the Founding Director of the School of Business, Founding Dean of the Faculty of Business and Economics, and served as the University's Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Provost.

His current research focuses on the political economy of Hong Kong's post-war economic success and its relationship with the policy of positive non-interventionism; the articulation of the challenges and opportunities presented by the opening of China; the integration of Hong Kong with China under one-country two-system; the rising competition from its neighbors amidst rapid structural transformation of the Hong Kong economy and the globalization of world markets, with special emphasis on the mobility of human resources. He has led pioneering efforts in studying regional economic development in the Pearl River Delta and Yangzi River Delta regions following China’s economic transformation. His recent publications include The Fifth Dragon: Emergence of the Pearl River Delta (co-author), Port Facilities and Container Handling Services (co-author), On Privatizing Public HousingMade in PRD – The Changing Face of HK Manufacturers (co-author), Retaking Economic Center Stage, and Made in PRD: Challenges & Opportunities for HK Industry.

He has served on a number of public bodies, including the Exchange Fund Advisory Committee, Housing Authority, Chief Executive’s Commission on Innovation and Technology,  and the Hospital Authority.  He is currently an independent non-executive director of a number of publicly listed companies: Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltd., Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (Asia) Ltd., Orient Overseas (International) Ltd., The Link REIT, and Hong Kong Mercantile Exchange.  He was also a member on the Management Board of the Kowloon-Canton Railway Ltd. He was awarded the Silver Bauhinia Star in 1999 by the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region in recognition of his contributions to education, housing, and industry and technology development.  He was appointed a Justice of the Peace in 2000.

He writes a weekly political economy column for the Hong Kong Economic Journal and maintains a blog at http://www.wangyujian.com/.



Wednesday - October 19, 2011 - 5:30 PM (NOTE EARLY START TIME)
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

anpoANPO: The Arts of Resistance
A film screening and conversation with director Linda Hoaglund

“ANPO” is a Japanese term referring to the U.S.-Japan Mutual Security Treaty, which allows for stationing American troops and bases in Okinawa and elsewhere in Japan. In 1960, public resentment and concerns about this military presence boiled over into massive popular demonstrations. Japanese artists then and now both chronicle and contribute to this resistance movement with a rich range of works, including many large-scale paintings that remain little known outside of Japan. Linda Hoaglund’s ANPO: Art X War vividly captures this story of cultural politics.  

Linda Hoaglund is a filmmaker and translator. She produced the acclaimed documentary Wings of Defeat (2007), about Japanese kamikaze pilots, and has written subtitles for over 200 films, including those by Akira Kurosawa and Hayao Miyazaki.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California, the Japan Society of Northern California, and the Dilena Takeyama Center for the Study of Japan and Japanese Culture at San Francisco State University.



Monday - October 17, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

FukuyamaFrancis Fukuyama on “Political Institutions” 
An interview and book signing

The publication of Professor Fukuyama’s The End of History and the First Man caused a sensation; his thesis that the victory of democracy and capitalism over communism ushered in a new age is still debated. A Harvard Ph.D., he is now the Olivier Nomellinin Senior Fellow at Stanford University. His new book, The Origins of Political Order suggests that the first modern state arose in ancient China and the rule of law in ancient India. 

As the youngest of the neo-conservatives in the Reagan years—often seen, read, and heard around Washington power centers—he broke with the neo-cons over the Iraq war, endorsing then Senator Obama. Come hear one of the most courteous and controversial public intellectuals. 

Patrick L. Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California and the USF Masters of Arts in International Studies Program.



Tuesday - October 11, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

uschinaWhat's Wrong with America and China?
A talk by Dr. Ronnie C. Chan, Chairman, Hang Lung Group and Hang Lung Properties

What does China’s spectacular rise mean to the people in America and China?  Dr. Chan will postulate the differences in the political systems of the US and China which are rooted in different cultural traditions. He will also discuss the ramifications of such differences for US-China relations.

WATCH THIS TALK ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL!

Ronnie C. Chan is the Chairman of Hang Lung Group Limited and its subsidiary Hang Lung Properties Limited. Both are publicly listed companies in Hong Kong, with the latter being a constituent stock of the Hang Seng Index. Founded in 1960, it has been expanding into mainland China since 1992. For the year of 2011, Hang Lung Properties reported a net profit of US$743.27 million. Following successes in Shanghai, since 2005 Hang Lung has been investing US$6.9 billion and building a number of world-class commercial complexes in several major Chinese cities – Tianjin, Shenyang, Jinan, Wuxi and Dalian. The first of these projects, Shenyang Palace 66, was completed and opened in June 2010, which heralds an era where one or more design-award-winning malls will open each year.

Mr. Chan co-founded the Morningside group. In the past two decades, Morningside and its associates owned and managed companies focusing on manufacturing, public transport operations, outdoor advertising, media, healthcare, online game operators, high tech and biotech investments in mainland China, developmental capital investments in Southeast Asia, manufacturing and distribution in Europe, and service industries, biotech and other venture capital investments in North America.

In Hong Kong and the mainland of China, Mr. Chan is Chairman of the Executive Committees of the One Country Two Systems Research Institute and of the Better Hong Kong Foundation, Convenor of the Hong Kong Development Forum, a Vice President of the Real Estate Developers Association of Hong Kong, a Governing Board member of the China-United States Exchange Foundation, an Advisor and former Vice President of the China Development Research Foundation of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China, and a former Trustee of China Foreign Affairs University. He founded and chairs the China Heritage Fund which restores cultural relics in China. He is also a co-founding director of The Forbidden City Cultural Heritage Conservation Foundation, Beijing. He is a former government appointed Non-executive Director of The Securities and Futures Commission of Hong Kong, the founding Chairman Emeritus of the Asia Business Council, and a former Chairman of the Hong Kong-United States Business Council.

Internationally, Mr. Chan is a Co-Chair of the Board of the Asia Society and Chairman of its Hong Kong Center, a founding Trustee of the African-Asian Society and a Director of the Board of the Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the National Committee on United States-China Relations, the Committee of 100, and the Advisory Board of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Jakarta. Mr. Chan is a former director of Standard Chartered PLC and Motorola, Inc. He is also a former member of the governing boards of the World Economic Forum, East-West Center, Pacific Council on International Policy, Eisenhower Fellowships, and The Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation.

Mr. Chan is involved in many educational endeavors. He is a Court member of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, a Trustee of the University of Southern California, and a Governing Board member of the Indian School of Business. He serves on the President’s Council on International Activities at Yale University, the International Advisory Council of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, the International Advisory Committee of The Pacific Basin Institute at Pomona College, and the International Advisory Committee of the Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies at Waseda University. He also co-chairs the International Advisory Board of The Culture and Civilization of China, a joint project of Yale University Press and China International Publishing Group. He currently serves as Advisor on Strategic Development to Tsinghua University and Chairman of Hang Lung Center for Real Estate at Tsinghua University. He is also a Guest Professor at Tsinghua University and Nanjing University. He is a former Co-Chair of the Advisory Committee of the Center for Real Estate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a former Brittingham Visiting Scholar at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Mr. Chan is a frequent speaker at international conferences and has published numerous articles in International Herald Tribune, Financial TimesNewsweekFortune,Asian Wall Street JournalFar Eastern Economic Review and Japan Times. Mr. Chan holds an MBA from the University of Southern California and an honorary doctorate in social sciences from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. In 2004, he received the Asia Society Leadership Award for strengthening economic, cultural and political ties between China and the United States, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Southeast Asia. In 2009, he received the Outstanding Persons Award for the Preservation of Chinese Cultural Relics and the Highest Alumni Award of the University of Southern California. He is 61 years of age and resides in Hong Kong with his wife. They have two grown sons.

Co-sponsored by the USF School of Management, The Asia Foundation, Asia Society Northern California, and the California-Asia Business Council. 



Wednesday - September 21, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

aseanIndonesia and Southeast Asia: The Role of ASEAN in Regional Development
Indonesia’s Ambassador to ASEAN, His Excellency I Gede Ngurah Swajaya

ASEAN, which comprises Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, and Indonesia, has a combined gross domestic product of around US$1.8 trillion and a population of more than 500 million. Indonesia is seeking to raise its global profile through its efforts in the organization, and, with its economy booming and its transformation to full democracy, has ambitions of playing a greater role both regionally and globally.

Speaker: Ambassador Swajaya is a graduate of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and the former Indonesian ambassador to Cambodia.

Discussant: Shalendra Sharma, Ph.D., USF Professor of Politics. Moderator: Amb. James D. Rosenthal, Vice Chair, Center for the Pacific Rim Advisory Board. 

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by The Asia Foundation, and the Consulate General of Indonesia in San Francisco, the Hon. Asianto Sinambela, Consul General.



Monday - September 19, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

turandotTurandot: Excerpts and Explanations
Featuring Dr. Clifford Cranna, Director of Music Administration, San Francisco Opera

A cold, cruel Chinese princess challenges suitors with three riddles; fail and you forfeit your head. But this is Italian opera, and Pucinni’s last, so he allowed the princess to find love in the last act. 

For decades Chairman Mao forbade performances, calling this opera “anti-Chinese”. Since Mao’s death Beijing officials have permitted majestic productions, even within the Forbidden City itself. Dr. Cranna will explain how Puccini and others took a Central Asian tale, through China, and gave it a Western turn, with Puccini going so far as to imitate Chinese melodies. 

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California and the Chinese Historical Society of America.

PHOTO CREDIT: Johan Persson/Royal Opera House.



Friday - September 16, 2011 - 12:15 PM
USF Main Campus, University Center Room 222 
Enter from Golden Gate @ Chabot or from Fulton @ Clayton

mooreNew Zealand in the Pacific Rim
An informal discussion with Mike Moore, Ambassador of New Zealand to the United States, and Former Prime Minister of New Zealand

The USF Center for the Pacific Rim is honored to host an informal discussion with Mr Mike Moore, former Prime Minister of New Zealand, currently serving as New Zealand's Ambassador to the US.  Mr Moore will discuss New Zealand's relationships with Pacific Rim countries, particularly China, along with the Trans-Pacific partnership negotiations. 

Mike Moore is a past Director-General of the World Trade Organization (WTO).  He oversaw the launch of the Doha Development Round.  His period in office saw the successful accession to the WTO of China and Chinese Taipei along with Estonia, Jordan, Georgia, Albania, Oman, Croatia, Lithuania, and Moldova. 

Moore is a former Prime Minister of New Zealand. He held portfolios in a wide range of areas and served in a number of senior political positions including Trade Minister, Foreign Minister, Minister of Tourism, Minister for the Americas Cup and Deputy Minister of Finance. Mike Moore worked as a meat and construction worker, and a printer where he became an active Trade Unionist. He became a social worker in a hospital for the criminally insane – an experience he claims “prepared him well for a life in politics”. 

Moore held numerous appointments and board memberships with global policy and commercial organizations. These included Membership of the United Nations Commission on the Legal Empowerment of the Poor; Commissioner for the UN Global Commission on International Migration; and a number of private sector boards. Moore served on the Economic Development Board of South Australia, and was an adviser to other Governments.  Moore was an Adjunct Professor at Adelaide University, Australia, and La Trobe University, Australia, and is Honorary Professor at Beijing Normal University in Zhuhai, at the Chinese University for Political Science and International Law in Beijing, and at Shanghai Customs College. 

Moore is the recipient of numerous honors from governments in Africa, Europe and South America. He was awarded New Zealand’s highest honor, the Order of New Zealand. Moore also holds honorary doctorates from Lincoln University, New Zealand; the People’s University of China, Beijing; Auckland University of Technology and Canterbury University; and La Trobe University in Australia. He is the author of ten books including: A Pacific ParliamentHard Labour, Fighting For New ZealandChildren of the PoorA Brief History of the Future, and A World Without Walls. Moore’s latest book, Saving Globalisation, was published by Wiley’s in 2009. Moore is also the founder of a New Zealand Charity “School Aid” which creates investment funds which are managed by High School students, the profits of which will go to schools in developing countries.



Wednesday - September 14, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
Enter from Turk between Chabot and Parker

hsiaA Jesuit in the Forbidden City: Matteo Ricci (1552 – 1610)
A presentation and book signing with the author, R. Po-Chia Hsia, PhD

Matteo Ricci, an Italian Jesuit, was one of the most famous missionaries to China of all time. A pioneer in bridging Christianity to China, Ricci spent 28 years in the country, in which time he crossed the cultural divide between China and the West by immersing himself in the language and culture of his hosts. Even 400 years later, he is still one of the best known Westerners in China, celebrated for introducing Western scientific and religious ideas to China and for explaining Chinese culture to Europe. By employing all relevant sources, both Chinese and Western, R. Po-Chia Hsia has produced the most up-to-date and comprehensive biography of Ricci's remarkable life, from his childhood in Macerata, Italy, through his education in Rome, to his sojourn in Portuguese India, and eventually his long journey of self-discovery and cultural encounter in the Ming realm of China from the late 16th to the early 17th centuries.

Free and open to the public. For more information, please contact the Ricci Institute at 415-422-6401 or by email. 

Presented by the EDS-Stewart Chair at the Ricci Institute, USF Center for the Pacific Rim.



Monday - September 12, 2011 - 6:00 PM
USF Main Campus, McLaren Complex Room 252 
Enter from Golden Gate @ Chabot or from Fulton @ Clayton

balidanceAn Evening of Enchanting Indonesian Ethnic Dance
Featuring dancers from the Indonesia Institute of the Arts - Denpasar, Bali

Indonesia’s thousands of islands, large and small, are home to a dazzling diversity of art, music, and other cultural forms; among these riches, Indonesian dance is so highly prized that in November 2011 UNESCO is planning to declare the Saman dance from Aceh Province part of the world’s “intangible cultural heritage.”

The expert dancers of Bali’s Indonesia Institute of the Arts will provide a ‘grand tour’ of the variety of Indonesian ethnic dance from the tribal forms of Papua and Sulawesi in the far West and North of the country, to the sophisticated temple and popular dances of Bali and Java in the East. Join us for this unforgettable evening, including live gamelan performance!

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Co-presented with the Consulate General of Indonesia in San Francisco, the Hon. Asianto Sinambela, Consul General.



Tuesday - August 30, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

silverEmpire of Silver
A talk, with excerpts from the film, by writer/directorChristina Yao

Empire of Silver opened to rave reviews, the New York Times reporting that this engaging film “of banking and bad behavior makes 19th century China look like 21st century America”. The film has won over a dozen awards for a story of the merchant culture of late Qing-era Shanxi province, China’s “Wall Street” at the time. For screening in China, Beijing authorities censored the sex but left in the money! 

This is the debut film of Taiwan-born, Palo Alto-based Christina Yao. An actress-dramatist-animator, who earned a Ph.D. in Asian Theatre at Stanford and has directed plays at San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theatre, the National Theatre of Taiwan, and elswhere, Yao now has her own film company in Hong Kong.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the USF Media Studies Department and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



Monday - June 20, 2011 - 7:00 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

wagnerBuddhism and Wagner
A panel discussion in conjunction with the San Francisco Opera's production of The Ring of the Nibelung

Wagner grew up in the Saxon capital of Dresden, a city steeped in things oriental since the 18th century. By Wagner’s time Shopenhauer had introduced the German elite to Buddhism, a European-wide event given the recent arrival of Buddhist sutras brought home by explorers. Panelists include Peter Bassett, writer and lecturer on the works of Richard Wagner and former Australian diplomat, and Paul Schofield, author ofThe Redeemer Reborn: Parsifal as the Fifth Opera of Wagner’s Ring and former Zen Buddhist monk.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. 

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.  For reservations please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by San Francisco Opera and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



Thursday - May 12, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

ChileChile in the Pacific Rim: Integration and Growth
A talk by Hernan G. Somerville, President, Chilean Association of Banks and Financial Institutions 

Chile today is a thriving democracy having bounced bank from the dark days of the recent dictatorship.  It dominates world copper markets, it competes with California and Australia in the excellence of its wine exports, and its chemical industries are the globe's most modern.  China is Chile's leading trading partner, followed by Japan and the U.S.

Hernan Somerville, a Chilean, will talk about the integration of Chile in the Pacific Rim and its prospects for economic growth.  In 1983, as the Director of Chile's Central Bank, he restructured Chile's external debt.  He holds a law degree from the University of Chile, Santiago and an M.C.J. degree from New York University.  Mr. Somerville serves on the Asia Pacific Economic Council's Business Advisory Committee, and is Chairman of the Chilean Pacific Foundation, a think talk.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. 

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.  For reservations please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of North America. the USF Center for Latin American Studies (CELASA), the Latin American Studies program, the Pan American Society of USF, and USF's School of Business & Professional Studies.





Thursday - May 5, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

bali2Bewitching Balinese Beauty
A visual presentation by Natasha Reichle, Curator at the Asian Art Museum

In Bali, art lives in unexpected places and beauty  dwells in the everyday.  While it is widely appreciated as a vibrant center of visual and performing arts, there has never been an in-depth exploration of its artistic traditions in the U.S. until now.  This exhibit brings together 131 artworks representing this unique Indonesian island.  Come and be enchanted.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.  For reservations please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Indonesian Consulate General in San Francisco, the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the USF Master of Arts in International Studies, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.


 

Thursday - April 26, 2011 - 5:45 PM 
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

HKGHong Kong Today
An illustrated talk featuring Jeff Wing-yan Leung, Director, Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, San Francisco

Hong Kong is the twelfth largest trader in the world, with financial services, trade, and professional activities the key drivers of growth.  Services account for 90% of GDP and it is the sixth largest source of direct foreign investment in the world.  In the auction world Sotheby’s Hong Kong office overtook London’s to make China the second biggest global art market.  The Pacific gateway to China, handling 22% of China’s foreign trade, it is also one of the most scenic cities along the Pacific Rim, attracting over 30 million visitors a year to this many-splendored place, where they often serve California wines, one of our exports to China’s growing wine culture.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; reservations recommended.  Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the Chinese Historical Society of America, and USF’s School of Business and Professional Studies.




Thursday - April 21, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

FukushimaAfter the Deluge: Nuclear Crisis in Japan and the Environment, Energy Policy, and Public Health

In this Earth Day preview event, we will explore some important long-term implications of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, and the nuclear crisis that followed. Focusing on environmental, energy, and public health issues in Japan and other Pacific Rim countries, the discussion will analyze the repercussions of the disaster— What will be the impact of radiation leakage from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on people and the environment? How will this crisis affect future efforts to combat climate change?

Join Peter Hayes, Ph.D., Executive Director, Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability, and Kirk Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Global Environmental Health, UC Berkeley for a discussion that goes beyond the headlines of these dramatic, tragic events, and examines the likely impacts they will have for our lives on the Pacific Rim and around the world.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; Reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Presented by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability and the Japan Policy Research institute at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim. Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California, Give2Asia, the USF Biology Department,the USF Environmental Studies Program, the USF Master of Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) Program, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Tuesday - April 19, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

sushiSustainable Sushi? Seafood Watch and the Future of the Oceans
A lecture by Michael Sutton, J.D., Vice President, Monterey Bay Aquarium

The oceans supply us with food, help regulate our climate, and supply a livelihood for millions of people. But our seas are not the infinite bounty they appear to be. Today, pollution and over-fishing threaten significant members of ocean ecosystems, ranging from whales, sharks, and bluefin tuna to sea otters, seahorses, and tropical corals. Michael Sutton will tell us about the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s research and conservation efforts as well as the many ways all of us, as engaged citizens and conscientious consumers, can promote sustainable practices and become stewards of our marine resources.

Followed by a sushi reception with Michael Sutton and Casson Trenor, author ofSustainable Sushi: A Guide to Saving the Oceans One Bit at a Time. The reception is generously supported by Tataki, San Francisco’s “Original Sustainable Sushi Bar.”

Free and open to the public. For reservations call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by Asia Society Northern California, Japan Society of Northern California, USF Asian Studies Program, USF Biology Department, USF Environmental Sciences Department, USF Environmental Studies Program, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

 




Thursday, April 7, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

CrosstalkThe Promise and Perils of Interdependence in Cross-Strait Relations
A lecture by Dr. Daniel Lynch, Professor of International Relations, University of Southern California

 In recent years Taiwan’s strategy for Cross-Strait relations with China has been to encourage economic and cultural integration in the hope of eventually negotiating a peace agreement that freezes the political status quo. This strategy pursuing interdependence and autonomy seems reasonable, and has been firmly backed by two successive U.S. presidential administrations. But will is it really building stable and peaceful relations across the Taiwan Strait and in the Pacific Rim? Come hear Dr. Lynch’s expert views.

Free and open to the public. Reservations recommended; call (415) 422-6828.

Presented by the Japan Policy Research Institute (JPRI) at the University of San Francisco Center for the Pacific Rim and Strait Talk University of California Berkeley Chapter.

Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California, the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning, the Institute of East Asian Studies at UC Berkeley, Taiwanese American Professionals (TAP), and the USF Master of Arts in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program.

This event opens the 2011 Bay Area Strait Talk Symposium – a week of policy workshops and public events to promote peaceful relations across the Taiwan Strait and throughout the Pacific Rim.




Tuesday, March 29, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

nukeNo Nukes, Not Now, Not Ever
An interview and film with William J. Perry, Ph.D., U.S. Secretary of Defense, 1994-1997

Dr. William J. Perry, along with former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger, George Shulz, and Senator Sam Nunn, appear in the short film “Nuclear Tipping Point,” the four working to convince the power elite to rid the world of nuclear weapons.  Presidents from Ike to JFK, Carter to Reagan wanted to rid the U.S. of these radioactive albatrosses, but to no avail.  Now with a dangerous arch stretching from the Russian Far East via North Korea, China, India, Pakistan, Iran?, to Israel, what is to be done to avoid a global disaster?  Since the U.S. started it in the Pacific, must it stop it by taking the first pacific steps?  Come hear Dr. Perry’s views.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. 

Free and open to the public. For reservations call 415 422-6828. Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the Japan Policy Research Institute at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, the USF Master of Arts in International Studies (MAIS), the USF Lane Center, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, McLaren Center Room 250
Enter from either Golden Gate or Fulton

shengNANKING! NANKING!
A presentation by Bright Sheng, Leonard Bernstein Distinguished University Professor of Music (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor)

Bright Sheng (Sheng Zongliang, 盛宗亮), one of the foremost composers of our time, will present a major orchestral piece of his, Nanking! Nanking! (南京! 南京!). This work, commissioned and premiered by Christoph Eschenbach and the Northern German Radio Symphony, a threnody for orchestra and pipa that memorializes the emotional upheaval of Nanking citizens during the Japanese siege known as the “Rape of Nanking” in World War II. Sheng will talk about the sources of inspiration for this work and present a PowerPoint verbalization of the music. The event is free and open to the public.

A talented composer, pianist and conductor, Sheng has received numerous awards, including the MacArthur "Genius" Award, the American Award in Music from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and an ASCAP Achievement Award.  His work has been featured by major orchestras around the world and portrayed in Carnegie Hall.  Sheng’s music has been recorded on Sony Classical, BIS, Delos, Koch International, New World, Telarc and Naxos labels.  For more information about Bright Sheng please visit his website: http://www.brightsheng.com/

Cosponsored by the USF College of Arts and Sciences, the USF School of Business, the Japan Policy Research Institute at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, the Hong Kong University Alumni Association, Asia Society Northern California, and the USF Department of Performing Arts and Social Justice.




Thursday, March 10, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

pacificbottomBENEATH THE PACIFIC OCEAN
A visual presentation by Stephen R. Hammond, Ph.D., US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Jules Verne imagined what things looked like 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea; Dr. Stephen Hammond knows.  Starting in the summer of 2010 the U.S. and Indonesia commenced a joint 5-year effort to explore the deep seas off Indonesian islands.  Results from the first year are spectacular and include animal communities thriving among magmatically-driven hot springs at the summit of a large submarine volcano, and an abundance and diversity of deep corals never before seen.  Biodiversity lives and runs deep.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate.

Free and open to the public.  For reservations please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California and the Department of Biology at USF.




Tuesday, March 8, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

amwTHE ASIAN AMERICAN ACTING LEGACY OF ANNA MAY WONG
An illustrated discussion featuring Elaine. H. Kim, Ph.D.

“One considerable spot of yellow that has come to stay on the silver of the screen”, as she referred to herself, Anna May Wong was a pioneer in American film at a time when both her gender and her race were problematic.

Join Dr. Elaine H. Kim, writer and director of Slaying the Dragon Reloaded: Asian Women in Hollywood and Beyond and coordinator of UC Berkeley’s Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies program, for an illustrated discussion of Yunha Hong’s new film Anna May Wong: In Her Own Words and an exploration of the larger topic of Asian American’s in film, yesterday and today. Stephen Gong, Executive Director of the Center for Asian American Media, and actress Theresa Navarro will join Dr. Kim in conversation about Wong and her lasting legacy.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; RSVP recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Co-sponsored by the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival and the USF Program in Asian American Studies.

ANNA MAY WONG: IN HER OWN WORDS, sponsored by Learn Asia at USF and SLAYING THE DRAGON RELOADED will screen at the SFIAAFF on March 12, 13, and 16. For more details visit http://caamedia.org/festival/




Thursday, March 3, 2011 - 5:45 PM 
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall 
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

olmec2COLOSSAL OLMEC ART 
A visual presentation of the de Young Museum exhibit by Kathleen Berrin, Curator in Charge, Africa, Oceania, and Americas, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

Before Columbus arrived, before Mayan or Aztec cultures arose, there existed in today’s Mexican states of Veracruz and Tobasco the “mother culture” of Mesoamerica, the Olmecs, who developed an iconic artistic style as early as the second millennium B.C.  The Olmecs were contemporaries of the Chinese Zhou dynasty, and this exhibit includes giant stone heads, large scale thrones, and monumental stelae plus masks, jewelry, and figures.  Come marvel at the latest finds.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. 

Free and open to the public. For reservations call 415 422-6828. 

Cosponsored by the USF Center for Latino Studies in the Americas (CELASA), the USF Latin American Studies program, the Pan American Society at USF (PASUSF), and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning. 




Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 5:45 PM 
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

The Spring 2011 Y.L. Wu Lecture presented by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and the USF Department of Economics

dollarTHE RISE AND FALL OF THE DOLLAR
Delivered by Barry Eichengreen, Ph.D., Economist, University of California, Berkeley

When winners win wars, they write new rules. The U.S. was the only undamaged big economy coming out of WW II; thus the dollar became the world’s preeminent currency. But is the damaged dollar doomed, a demise brought on by the rise of the EURO and China’s renminbi? In Eichengreen’s new book Exorbitant Privilege, he argues that the threat is domestic, not international. The greenback’s fate hinges not on Asia or Europe but on U.S. policy decisions. 

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. 

Free and open to the public. For reservations call 415 422-6828. 

Cosponsored by the USF School of Business and Professional Studies and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Thursday, February 10, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

afghanjpriAFGHANISTAN UPDATE
What do Afghan People Want and Can the International Community Really Help?

News reports on Afghanistan can make for troubling reading.  Indeed, Afghanistan is a fragile, conflict-riddled state where the government's authority is frequently contested and international assistance not necessarily welcomed.  Are there signs for hope?

Dr. John de Boer, who has been working on the Afghanistan-Pakistan Task Force of the Canadian International Development Agency, and helped formulate policy for the joint Canadian-U.S. Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team, provides us a report from the front lines of this humanitarian and  international affairs challenge.  Dr. de Boer is now the Program Leader for Peace, Conflict, and Development at the International Development Research Centre based in Canada.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. For reservations please call (415) 422-6828.

Presented by the Japan Policy Research Center (JPRI) and the Master of Arts in Asia Pacific Studies Program at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim.

Cosponsorsed by The Asia Society Northern California, the USF Master of Arts in International Studies Program (MAIS) and the Fromm institute for Lifelong Learning. This is event is part of the USF JPRI-Asia Society Human Security Initiative.gray pix




Thursday, February 3, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton

cchanTHE CAREER OF CHARLIE CHAN
A discussion with Yunte Huang, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara

From Honolulu to Harvard to Hollywood the creation of a Chinese “fictional” detective launched both book and film series, successful then, damned now. In the 1930s Chan was the good Chinese ste­reotype as opposed to his bad opposite, Dr. Fu Manchu. Cinema chieftains insisted both be played by Whites in “yellow face”, the same racist view that forced White actors into “black face” when imitating Blacks. Unlike Fu Manchu, a real Chinese detective, Chang Apana, who rose from Oahu houseboy to Waimea cowboy to a bullwhip-toting cop no one called “boy”, served as a model for Charlie. Huang’s Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and His Rendezvous with American History is on many best books of 2010 lists, praised by Jonathan Spence, dean of Chinese Studies at Yale University. Come hear and see the controversy.

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate.


Free & Open to the public. For reservations please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Chinese Historical Society of America, USF’s Media Studies Department, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Tuesday, February 1, 2011 - 5:45 PM
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
Parker at Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco

sunsetTHE DECLINE OF THE WEST?
An interview and book signing with Ian Morris, Ph.D., Willard Professor of History and Classics, Stanford University

Not since Paul Kennedy’s The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers has there been such interest in and out of academia in a new book as there is in Why the West Rules—for Now. Must power be a zero sum game? If Asia rises must America decline? Over the long term Morris argues for geography and technology as power determinants, not culture or leaders—latitude not attitude. Sung dynasty China once led the world, Europe a backwater. Is the power pendulum swinging back to India and China? 

Patrick Hatcher, Ph.D., Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will moderate. 

Free and open to the Public.  For reservations please call (415) 422-6828. 

Cosponsored by the USF Master of Arts in International Studies Program and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning