Bollywood Nation
August 26, 2014
5 - 6:30 p.m.
McLaren Conference Center 250 
more info »
Bridging the Pacific bridge and city at night
Ship and skyline
Entering a Japanese temple through round door
riverfront market
Japanese temple on the water
chinese market
Shanghai skyline
Korean women in bright dresses
boat vendors
Airport sign with destinations

2007 Events Archive

 

Tuesday, October 30, 2007, 5:45 p.m.
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
(Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton)

An interview and booksigning with Gail Tsukiyama

Gail Tsukiyama is a mesmerizing storyteller who focuses on family, tradition, and the solace of nature. Of both Chinese and Japanese descent, she has explored the history and culture of both lands in her many previous novels. In this new novel she tells the story of two orphaned boys raised by their loving grandparents on prewar Tokyo's Street of a Thousand Bossoms. The war, particularly the Tokyo fire-bombing followed by the American occupation and the rapid rise of modern Japan, shape the lives of the two brothers and the women who love them. The orphans embark on opposite careers, one in sumo wrestling and the other mask-making for Noh theater. Tsukiyama evokes a classic vision of a blasted world returning to life.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will conduct the interview. A book signing will follow.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Japan Society of Northern California, the Mechanics' Institute, the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning, the USF Asian American Studies Program and USF's MFA in Writing Program. Funded by the Kiriyama Chair for Pacific Rim Studies at USF.





Friday, 5 October 2007, 3:00-5:00 p.m.
USF Main Campus, McLaren Room 250 
(Golden Gate Avenue between Masonic & Parker)

The Ambassador Alfonso Yuchengco Annual Lecture Series presents 
Premiere screening of Sandaan and conversation with film director, producer, and writer Noel M. Izon 
f
ollowed by a panel discussion featuring Major General Antonio Taguba and Maria Mabilangan Haley

Sandaan is a gripping one-hour documentary commissioned in 2006 by the Smithsonian Institution’s Asian Pacific American Program to celebrate the centennial of Filipino immigration to America via Hawaii. The film, produced by the award-winning team of filmmakers who created An Untold Triumph, the story of Filipino American soldiers who fought in WWII, chronicles through first-person interviews four generations of Filipinos in the U.S. and their personal stories of triumph and sacrifice in America as well as their insights on U.S.-Philippine relations.

Producer, director, and writer Noel M. Izon was born in Manila and spent 10 years at PBS affiliate WNVT-Virginia and at the Educational Film Center; he continues to serve as consultant to advertising and national public relations firms. Major General Antonio Taguba, interviewed in the film, is the U.S. Army officer who exposed the Abu Ghraib prison abuses and who was ostracized by military colleagues for speaking the truth. Maria Mabilangan Haley, also interviewed in the film, is currently Economic Secretary of the State of Arkansas and former Export-Import Bank of the United States officer during the Clinton administration.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Co-presented with the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM). Cosponsored by the USF Yuchengco Philippine Studies, Asian Studies, and Asian American Studies Programs. Funded by a grant from Ambassador Alfonso Yuchengco. 



Thursday, 4 October 2007, 5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(Turk @ Parker Street in San Francisco)

In Discussion with 
Major General Antonio Taguba

How did torture of detainees happen in this American controlled prison in Baghdad? Was it the work, as charged, of only a few ‘bad apples’? Or did senior Bush Administration officials create an atmosphere that tolerated torture, “the result of a high-level interrogation policy that encouraged abuse.” Once the scandal broke, General Taguba conducted the official military investigation of Abu Ghraib. He states, “From what I know, troops just don’t take it upon themselves to initiate what they did without any form of knowledge of the higher ups”? How high? Taguba again: “The whole idea that Rumsfeld projects—’we’re here to protect the nation from terrorism’—is an oxymoron. He and his aides have abused their offices... We violated the tenets of the Geneva Convention. We violated our own principles and we violated the core of our military values.” Taguba was asked to retire this year.

Will the contaminated fallout from Abu Ghraib, along with President Bush and his Attorney General’s personal abrogation of the Geneva Accord, endanger the safety of U.S. troops continuing to help fight trrorists in Afghanistan, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines, to name but a few flash points where our own military might be taken prisoner? General Colin Powell thinks it may. Come decide what you think.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will conduct the interview.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the USF Law School, the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at USF, the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning, and the Asia Society Northern California. 





Wednesday, 26 September 2007, 5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(Turk @ Parker Street in San Francisco)

New Guinea: Art of Birth, Death and Transformation
A talk with images featuring Christina Hellmich, Curator of Oceanic Art, DeYoung Museum

The South Pacific island of New Guinea is home to a long artistic tradition. In this rich, creative world where tribal practices combined magic with mystery, islanders carved, decorated, and painted their history. The Jolika gift of New Guinea artifacts includes over 400 examples including a towering Sepik hook figure, a Torres Strait mortuary mask, a monumental figure from the Biwat culture, and a Middle Sepik dance costume. The deYoung Museum can rightly claim to house one of the world’s most important collections of New Guinea art. Join us to see these many splendors!

Christina Hellmich earned her MA degree from New York University. Before coming to the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, she served as Associate Curator of Oceanic Art at the Peabody Essex Museum in Massachusetts. 

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California Center, USF’s Visual and Performing Arts Department, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning. Funded by the Kiriyama Chair for Pacific Rim Studies at USF.



Friday, 21 September 2007, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 260 (DelSanto Reading Room) 
(Turk @ Parker Street in San Francisco)

The Lotus & The Cross: East-West Cultural Exchange along the Silk Road
A one-day public symposium

For a complete symposium schedule, please visit the USF Ricci Institute website.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Advance registration for the symposium is required, as seating will be limited. For information, call 415-422-6401 or Email ricci@usfca.edu.

Co-sponsored by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and EDS-Stewart Chair at the USF Ricci Institute.



Thursday, 20 September 2007, 5:45 pm
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(Turk @ Parker Street in San Francisco)

The Lotus & The Cross: East-West Cultural Exchange along the Silk Road
An public lecture by Dr. Ken Parry

Thursday, 20 September to Friday 5 October 2007
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 260 (DelSanto Reading Room) 
(Turk @ Parker Street in San Francisco)

The Lotus & The Cross: East-West Cultural Exchange along the Silk Road
An exhibit of photographs and other materials

This is an exhibition of large-format photographs of stone tombstones from Fujian province in South China and stone crosses from Kerala state in South India, presenting some of the surviving archaeological evidence for early Eastern Christian presence in India and China. Written records and inscriptions show that between the fourth and seventh centuries Christians from the Middle East undertook trade and missionary work using the overland routes to China and the maritime spice route to India. The tombstones from Fujian belong to so-called “Nestorian” Christians who settled in South China during the Mongol Period (1272-1368), while the stone crosses from Kerala belong to various Syrian Christian communities, the earliest dated to the eighth century. A common iconographic motif to be seen on these remains from both continents is the mounting of the cross on the lotus flower.

The photographer and curator of the exhibition is Dr. Ken Parry. The photos were the result of an Australian Research Council-funded project based in the Department of Ancient History at Macquarie University. The exhibition has already been seen in Sydney (2003), Salzburg (2003), Kerala (2003), London (2004) and Ankara (2005).

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Please call 415-422-6401 for more information.

Co-sponsored by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and EDS-Stewart Chair at the USF Ricci Institute.




Thursday, 13 September 2007, 5:30 PM
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(Turk @ Parker Street in San Francisco)

Christianity & Cultures: Japan & China in Comparison (1543-1644)
A lecture and presentation exploring the Jesuit missions in the 16th and 17th centuries

M. Antoni J. Üçerler, S.J.is a lecturer in East Asian studies and comparative history at Campion Hall, University of Oxford and a corresponding member of the Jesuit Historical Institute in Rome. He is also a visiting fellow of the EDS-Stewart Chair at the Ricci Institute at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call 415-422-6401 or email ricci@usfca.edu 

Co-sponsored by the USF President’s Office, the USF Jesuit Community, The Joan and Ralph Lane Center for Catholic Studies and Social Thought, The Japan Society of Northern California, The USF Center for the Pacific Rim, The EDS-Stewart Chair at the USF Ricci Institute. 



 

 

 

Wednesday, August 29, 2007 • 5:45 p.m.

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
(Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton)

One Man's Mission to Fight Terrorism, One School at a Time 
An interview with slides featuring Greg Mortenson

Three Cups of Tea has spent the summer on the New York Times Best Seller List for a good reason--it is an inspirational read. While trying to climb K2, the world's deadliest peak, Greg Mortenson received help from an impoverished Himalayan village. When he left he promised the native Pakistanis that he would return and build them a school. Fifty-five schools later, he is a legend in the mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Against all odds he has built schools, especially for girls, in the very region that gave birth to the Taliban and sanctuary to Al Qaeda. A real-life Indiana Jones from Montana, he will tell you how he escaped kidnappers and fatwas issued by enraged mullahs. Three Cups of Tea won the 2007 Kiriyama Prize for non-fiction.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will conduct the interview.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; reservations recommended. Please call (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by Pacific Rim Voices/Kiriyama Book Prize, the Asia Society oNorthern California Center, the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning, and the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at USF. Funded by the Kiriyama Chair for Pacific Rim Studies at USF.

 

 





Tuesday, August 28, 2007, 5:45 p.m.
USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall
(Enter from Parker Street between Golden Gate & Fulton)
THIS IS OUR LOWER CAMPUS LOCATION 

India Rising 
A conversation with Ambassador B.S. Prakash

 

B.S. Prakash joined the Indian Foreign Service in 1975 and has served in Sri Lanka, Germany, and Saudi Arabia and was India’s ambassador to Uganda. He has also been a member of the Indian delegation to the United Nations, and his appearance here will inaugurate the USF Center’s year-long Festival of India. Today’s India is Asia’s newest economic engine and political powerhouse. Its booming economy has assured it great power status along with friendly relations with the United States, especially here in the Bay Area where high-tech companies rely heavily on Indian expertise and ties to India. 

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the Asia Society Northern California Center, the Mechanics’ Institute and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning. 


 
Monday, April 2, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall (Corner of Parker and Golden Gate)
(NOTE: This event is NOT at our usual Lone Mountain venue!)

China Blue: Workers, Owners, and the Clothes on Your Back
A discussion with Bay Area film maker Micha X. Peled

Anyone who has taken a close look at China’s tremendous economic dynamism over the last decade will certainly be impressed—possibly even frightened. However, the human face of China’s rapid leap forward has remained mostly obscured by the astonishing averages, the awesome tonnages, and the exhilarating growth rates. 

Director Micha Peled‘s 2005 documentary film China Blue takes us into the lives of the young (mostly female) workers whose hard work and personal dramas lay behind much of our affordable clothing. Peled will screen selected scenes from the film, talk about the production, and answer questions. 

The program will be moderated by Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim. 

China Blue will be shown on the PBS program “Independent Lens” in April. KQED will broadcast the presentation on April 3 at 10:30 p.m. See www.kqed.org for more details.

“. . . this is one of the best of many recent documentaries about globalization… with probing access and a level of detail similar films have failed to obtain.” (New York Magazine)

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Co-sponsored by the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival, KQED Public Television 9, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

 



Monday, March 26, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall (Corner of Parker and Golden Gate)
(NOTE: This event is NOT at our usual Lone Mountain venue!)

Pluralism in Israel Today 

An interview with Ishmael Khaldi, Israeli Deputy Consul General

After 1948 Israel became a state in which a boy, Ishmael Khaldi, lived in a Bedouin tent until he was 8 years old. Proud to be an Israeli, this nomad is the first Muslim envoy to rise through Israeli diplomatic ranks. Even though posted to San Francisco, he keeps in mind the 1 million Israeli Arabs, 170,000 of whom are Bedouins.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Mechanics' Institute, the USF Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)

Oriental Carpets in Renaissance Paintings

A presentation by author Lauren Arnold

The ancient Greeks called the land to their east Asia Minor. Once a homeland for Christians and Jews, it became part of an Arab and then Turkish empire. Some Christian communities survived along with their weaving of oriental carpets, which appear in early Renaissance paintings.Lauren Arnold will explain this phenomenon. 

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Mechanics' Institute, the USF Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.


Monday, March 19, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)

Of Global Bondage: Human Trafficking and the Scourge of Contemporary Slavery

A discussion with David Batstone, USF Professor of Theology and Religious Studies and author of Not For Sale: The Return of the Global Slave Trade—and How We Can Fight It.

The UN estimates there are over 12 million people in forced labor, bonded labor, forced child labor, and sexual servitude at any given time. While the horrors of slavery go mostly unnoticed in the developed world, consumers there unwittingly depend on this source of cheap labor. David Batstone has spent his career writing, lecturing, and campaigning for socially responsible business practices and against the plague of human trafficking. Batstone will talk about his new book Not For Sale, and the film Ghosts, a docudrama by British director Nick Broomfield focusing on the lives and deaths of Chinese migrant workers who enter indentured servitude to pay off those who smuggle them illegally into the UK. The trailer for the film will also be shown.

Ghosts screens at the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival on 17 and 21 March at the AMC 1000 Van Ness in San Francisco, and on 18 March at the PFA in Berkeley. For tickets and more information visit: www.asianamericanfilmfestival.org.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Co-presented by the 25th San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival. Co-sponsored bywww.notforsalecampaign.org and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.


 
15 to 25 March, 2007

The USF Center for the Pacific Rim and Master of Arts in Asia Pacific Studies Mini-Festival at the 25th San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival

GHOSTS

Sat, 3/17 - 5:15 PM; AMC 1000 Van Ness
Sun, 3/18 - 5:00 PM; Pacific Film Archive
Wed, 3/21 - 9:30 PM; AMC 1000 Van Ness

UK, 2006, 94mins, Mandarin w/E.S.
DIRECTOR/PRODUCER: Nick Broomfield

In February 2004, twenty-three illegal Chinese workers drowned when they were surprised by an incoming tide at England's Morecambe Bay. Ai Qin Lin, in an astonishing performance, plays an attractive young single mother from rural Fujian who is financially desperate enough to leave her child behind and embark on a grueling six-month overland trek to England . . . [READ MORE or buy tickets

THE GREAT HAPPINESS SPACE: TALE OF AN OSAKA LOVE THIEF

Sun, 3/18 - 9:30 PM; AMC 1000 Van Ness
Fri, 3/23 - 7:00 PM; Pacific Film Archive
Sun, 3/25 - 12:00 PM; Camera 12 Cinemas

USA 2006, 75mins, Japanese w/E.S.
DIRECTOR/PRODUCER/CINEMATOGRAPHER: Jake Clennell

THE GREAT HAPPINESS SPACE: TALE OF AN OSAKA LOVE THIEF takes us into the jaw-dropping subculture of Japanese "host clubs," where twenty-something men entertain female clients with free-flowing drinks, conversation and make-believe love, all at staggering cost. A modern twist on the age-old profession of female companionship, this burgeoning business is a microcosm for a society undergoing extreme shifts in gender relationships . . . [READ MORE or buy tickets

KABUL TRANSIT

Tue, 3/20 - 7:30 PM; Pacific Film Archive
Wed, 3/21 - 7:00 PM; AMC 1000 Van Ness

U.S.A. 2006, 85mins, English, Farsi, & Pashto w/E.S.
DIRECTORS/PRODUCERS: David Edwards, Maliha Zulfacar, Gregory Whitmore

KABUL TRANSIT presents a look at a city steeped in infamy. To some, Kabul was a cosmopolitan and progressive city; to others, it represented everything they did not have and could not imagine possible. Today, it is a city emerging from two decades of war, filled with a generation that has seen nothing but destruction. . . [READ MORE or buy tickets]

KORYO SARAM—THE UNRELIABLE PEOPLE
(Preceded by the Cuban-Korean short, MOTHERLAND

Tue, 3/20 - 7:00 PM; Opera Plaza Cinema
Thu, 3/22 - 7:00 PM; AMC 1000 Van Ness

US, 2006,
DIRECTOR/PRODUCER: Y. David Chung

In 1937, Josef Stalin began a campaign of massive ethnic cleansing, forcibly deporting everyone of Korean origin in Far East Russia to the unsettled steppe country of Central Asia, 3700 miles away. Y. David Chung and Matt Dibble’s groundbreaking documentary charts the extraordinary untold history of the Koryo Saram . . . [READ MORE or buy tickets]

Visit the Festival website for more information about these and all this year's films.

 



 

Monday, March 12, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)


Investing in China: American Capital Ventures Forth

A discussion John S. Wadsworth, Jr., Honorary Chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia &
Advisory Director for Morgan Stanley globally

Will raw American style capitalism work in the new Chinese system? Communism/socialism/ capitalism-what's wrong with this picture? Put simply-will this dog hunt? Can the Silicon Valley model work in China? Come hear the answers!

Until March 2001 John Wadsworth was a Managing Director of Morgan Stanley & Co. Inc. and Chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia Limited, which incorporates all of the firm's business for non-Japan Asia and Australia carried out through offices in Hong Kong, Singapore, Bangkok, Seoul, Taipei, Melbourne, Mumbai, Sydney, Shanghai, and Beijing. He also had policy and strategic oversight for the firm's business in Japan. He is Vice Chairman of the Asia Society Northern California, Chairman and co-founder of Ceyuan Ventures, and a member of the International Advisory Council of the China Securities Regulatory Commission.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California, USF's Entrepreneurship Program, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Friday, March 9, 2007, 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)


Medicine & Culture: Chinese-Western Medical Exchange (1644 - ca.1950)

The symposium will be an examination of the interaction between China and the West through medicine and pharmacology from the Qing dynasty through the early 1950s. The aim of the symposium is to provide a forum for the examination of themes related to this interaction, such as: social and cultural roles, social reform, education, cultural exchange, encounters with Christianity, relations of power, modernity, and issues of race and gender.

Conference only: $15.00; Conference with box lunch: $25.00; Registration required. Please call 415-422-6401 or e-mail ricci@usfca.edu for more information.

We gratefully acknowledge the generosity of the Lifemark Group in support of this public lecture & symposium.

Cosponsored by the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco, and the USF Center for the Pacific Rim. 





Thursday, March 8, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Del Santo Reading Room, LM 270
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)
 
(NOTE: This event is NOT at our usual Lone Mountain venue!)


Jesuits & Medicine in China at the Qing Imperial Court

Keynote public lecture by Marta Hanson, Ph.D. for the symposium on Medicine & Culture: Chinese-Western Medical Exchange (1644 -ca. 1950)

What kind of healing took place in the Qing imperial court during the reign of the Kangxi Emperor (r.1662-1722)? Chinese physicians offered acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, and medicinal tonics. Yet, the Emperor disliked Chinese acupuncture, loathed the smell of mugwort, would never get a massage, scoffed at Taoist longevity practices, and expressed skepticism of southern tonics and restoratives.

Free and open to the public; RSVP recommended. Please call 415-422-6401 or e-mail ricci@usfca.edu for RSVP or more information.

We gratefully acknowledge the generosity of the Lifemark Group in support of this public lecture & symposium.

Cosponsored by the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco, and the USF Center for the Pacific Rim.


 

Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall (Corner of Parker and Golden Gate)
(NOTE: This event is NOT at our usual Lone Mountain venue!)


A Triumphal Trilogy: BlowbackSorrows of Empire, and now Nemesis

A conversation with Chalmers Johnson 

WATCH A COMPLETE VIDEO OF THIS TALK.

Chalmers Johnson, one of America's leading public intellectuals, was awarded chairs by both U.C. Berkeley and U.C. San Diego during his long academic career. Among his two dozen books he set the standard for the study of the Chinese revolution (Peasant Nationalism) and the Japanese economy (MITI and the Japanese Economic Miracle). Upon retirement from U.C., Johnson founded the Japan Policy Research Institute in order to publish cutting-edge essays on current topics. His trilogy is a monumental study of American foreign and military problems in the 21st century. This program celebrates the publication this month of Nemesis: The Last Days of the American Republic.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Commonwealth Club of California, the Japan Society of Northern California, the Asia Society Northern California, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.


 

Wednesday, February 28, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)


China in Africa: A Race for Resources

A discussion with Colonel John Chere, Former Army Attaché, Morocco & Army Attaché Designate to Israel, and Bruce Rogers, Retired Foreign Service Officer to Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, and Algeria

Ming Dynasty China beat West Europeans to Africa when its large fleet sailed and traded along the African East Coast in 1405. Now they're back. Outsiders have exploited the continent's rich resources for centuries. Will the Chinese be any different? They have huge oil contracts with Angola and Nigeria, and cobalt and copper mines in the Congo and Zambia. But will they help bring peace to the Sudan or Somalia? For Equatorial Guinea, China built the roads to get to its timber; for Zambia it built dams for hydroelectric purposes. And with much hoopla Beijing hosted a 2006 China-Africa summit meeting.

John Chere has twice been Army Attaché to Morocco and graduated from the Royal Moroccan Military Staff College. He and Bruce Rogers, who spent his career as a diplomat before he retired from the State Department, have travelled extensively in Africa.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate. He has recently returned from Libya and Egypt and soon will go to South Africa and Botswana.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored with the Chinese Historical Society of America, the USF Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.


 

Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)


Inside Iran: Persian Powerhouse
 
A discussion with Abbas Milani, Ph.D., Stanford University and the Hoover Institution

Iran is the great power in the Persian Gulf and a major player in South Asia. Through most of the Cold War years Tehran was the critical American ally in this resource-rich region. The 1979 Iranian Revolution transformed the state when Ayatollah Khomeini replaced the Shah and founded an Islamic Republic. Since then Iran and the U.S. have been at loggerheads while Iranian oil feeds energy hungry China and Japan. Will misconceptions lead to yet another gulf war?

Dr. Abbas Milani served on the faculty of law and political science at Tehran University from 1979 to 1987 where he also was a member of its Center for International Studies. He also held appointments at the Iranian Center for Social Research and at the National University of Iran. Milani earned his B.A. in economics and political science at U.C. Berkeley and his Ph.D. at the University of Hawaii.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVP recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events RSVP Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored with the Asia Society Northern California, the Mechanics' Institute, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



Wednesday, February 14, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)


Canada Calling: A Successful Bilingual and Multiethnic Nation 
A discussion with The Hon. Marc LePage. Consul General of Canada, Consulate Général du Canada

Canada remains a resource-rich Pacific power that has recently launched an Asia-Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative, which is a system of transportation infrastructure-ports, rails, roads-to make continent-girding Canada the best hub facilitating global supply chains between America and Asia. Immigration is both increasing and increasingly Asian and Latino. Even more than the U.S., Canada is nowadays a nation of immigrants and guest workers. An active supporter of NAFTA, U.N. peacekeeping, and the Kyoto Protocol, Ottawa is a global player. Today Vancouver rivals San Francisco and Toronto rivals New York as places to labor, love, and live.

Mark LePage has worked in government since 1980, serving at home and abroad-Stockholm, Havana, San Diego. In 1994 he moved to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research as Director of business Development and then as vice president of Genome Canada.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

Free and open to the public; reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim Events Registration Line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California, the USF Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



Tuesday, February 13, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall (Corner of Parker and Golden Gate)
(NOTE: This event is NOT at our usual Lone Mountain venue!) 


The Bay Area's China Connnection
A discussion with R. Sean Randolph, Ph.D., President & CEO, Bay Area Economic Forum

R. Sean Randolph, Ph.D., forecasts that China, the world's fastest growing economy, is headed for yet another year of dazzling expansion, with 10 percent gross domestic product growth and more than $70 billion in foreign investment. Because of the rich history and diverse ties that link California to China, this is good news for our state and especially the Bay Area, which has emerged as the nation's leading U.S.-China portal. This expansion will be felt around the Pacific Rim as other economies compete to capture a larger China connection.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will moderate.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended. Please call the Center's reservation line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Bay Area Economic Forum, the Mechanics' Institute, the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning, and the USF Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good.



Wednesday, February 7, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd., between Masonic & Parker, San Francisco)


Gaman: Art from the Japanese American Internment Camps 
A presentation by Delphine Hirasuna, author of The Art of Gaman

In Japanese the word 'gáh-mon' (gaman) means 'enduring the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity'. In 1942 an estimated 120,000 Japanese-Americans were incarcerated in remote camps for the duration of World War II. Struggling to form communities within the camps, the internees fashioned furniture from scrap lumber, wove baskets from unraveled twine, and made jewelry from shells dug up from an ancient seabed. What they created is a celebration of the nobility of the human spirit in adversity. To capture camp life Hirasuna also taps archival photography from Ansel Adams to Dorothea Lange.

San Francisco's newest art venue, the Museum of Craft and Folk Art at 51 Yerba Buena Lane, will feature Hirasuna's exhibit until February 25, 2007.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will conduct the conversation.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended. Please call the Center's reservation line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by the Asia Society Northern California, the USF Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.




Tuesday, January 30, 2007, 5:45 p.m.

USF Main Campus, Fromm Hall (Enter on Parker, between Golden Gate & Masonic)
(NOTE: This event is NOT at our usual Lone Mountain venue!)


Transformations in the Global Economy 
An interview and booksigning with AnnaLee Saxenian, Ph.D.

AnnaLee Saxenian is Dean of the U.C. Berkeley School of Information. As an economic geographer she has identified profound changes around the Pacific Rim as foreign-born, technically-skilled entrepreneurs travel back and forth between Silicon Valley and their home countries, launching companies far from established centers of skill and technology. She explores the great paradox: How the 'brain drain' has become 'brain circulation,' a powerful force for regional development. Her new Argonauts - armed with Silicon Valley experience and relationships-identify Asian market opportunities, locate foreign partners, and manage cross-border businesses.

Dr. Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center, will conduct the conversation.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Reservations recommended. Please call the Center's reservation line at (415) 422-6828.

Cosponsored by USF School of Business and ManagementThe Journal of Asian Business Studies, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.