Bollywood Nation
August 26, 2014
5 - 6:30 p.m.
McLaren Conference Center 250 
more info »
Bridging the Pacific bridge and city at night
Ship and skyline
Entering a Japanese temple through round door
riverfront market
Japanese temple on the water
chinese market
Shanghai skyline
Korean women in bright dresses
boat vendors
Airport sign with destinations

2004 Events Archive

Monday, December 6, 2004, 5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

Looking Back: The Vietnam War's Impact in California
A talk by Marcia Eymann, Curator of Historial Photography, Oakland Museum of California

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Using more than 500 objects, photographs, and oral histories, "What's Going On?" marks the first time a major museum looks at the ways California was forever changed by the war in Vietnam. Marcia Eymann, Curator of historical photography at the Oakland Museum of California and project director of the exhibit "What's Going On?-California and the Vietnam Era" on view at the museum from August 28, 2004 to February 27, 2005, will present the best of this exhibit in a slide lecture here at USF. She will focus on the war's impact on California's economy, politics, demographics, and culture. More than any other recent Asian war involving the United States-be it World War II in the Pacific or the Korean War-the Vietnam War, America's longest war, tore a hole through the center of our nation. Looking back at the war today, some perspective can be gained, especially here in the Golden State. From Saigon to Sacramento the shock waves changed our state. Eymann is co-editor, with Charles Wollenberg, of the exhibition's companion book, What's Going On? (UC Press, 2004).

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, Ph.D., a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and author of Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalists in Vietnam (Stanford, 1990), will lead the discussion following Eymann's presentation.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC: Reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsored with the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at the University of San Francisco, the USF School of Law , the Mechanics' Institute Library , the Oakland Museum of California , and the World Affairs Council of Northern California .



Wednesday, December 1, 2004

5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

When Strange Gods Call
A lecture, reading and book launch with Pam Chun

Prize-winning author Pam Chun returns to the USF Hilltop for the launch of her second novel. "Pam Chun writes lovingly of Hawaii in When Strange Gods Call -a land of beauty and tradition, where the scent of plumeria fills each page, and a love once lost can be found again," comments bestselling author Gail Tsukiyama. Booklist Reviews has said that "Chun vividly evokes the lush, sensual land effectively and dramatizes the conflict between old traditions and fast-paced modernity" in this novel that combines Romeo and Juliet and West Side Story with an Asian-Western twist.

Pam Chun's first novel, The Money Dragon, won a 2003 Ka Palapala Po'okela Award from the Hawai'i Book Publishers' Association and was one of Hawai'i's Best Books in 2002. Recently Chun was recognized with an award by the Chinese Six Companies of San Francisco for the contribution her fiction has made to Chinese American culture and heritage. Pam Chun was born and raised in Hawai'i, and graduated from Punahou Academy and UC Berkeley. She is currently Vice-Chair and Chair-Elect of the USF Center for the Pacific Rim's Board, a story teller at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, and an active member of the Cal Alumni Association.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsored by The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco  and the Chinese Historical Society of America .



Monday, November 22, 2004, 
5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

China: Great Wall, Grey Boomtowns, Grand Dams
A Discussion with Peter Hessler

22 Nov 2004

Peter Hessler won the Kiriyama Prize for River Town, his Peace Corps memoir about teaching sons and daughters of Chinese peasants from small villages along the mid-section of the mighty Yangtze River, where China's longest river cuts a Chinese Grand Canyon through massive granite mountains. Hessler has since gone back to report on the life of millions of farmers displaced by the flooding caused by the Three Gorges dam project. His writings in the New Yorker and National Geographic have inspired a new generation of journalists in Beijing where he now resides. His sense of social justice touches a key issue for the Chinese authorities who continue to promise their people a better life. In his published writings on Chinese Boomtowns, Hessler notes the failure of social services to reach the workers at the bottom of the 'economic miracle.' He also has a wanderlust for China and its people, recently completing a 7,500 mile journey around the Great Wall to find out who still lives near to this ancient engineering marvel. In this interview Hessler will talk about all three: boomtowns, blockbuster dam, beloved wall.

Hessler will be interviewed by Dr. Patrick L. Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and frequent visitor to China.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsored with the Center's Ricci Institute , the Kiriyama Book Prize , the Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at USF, and the Chinese Historical Society of America.



Wednesday, November 17, 2004, 5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

The Deadliest Sin
A talk with Robert A.F. Thurman, renowned scholar of Tibetan Buddhism and author of Anger
17 Nov 2004

Robert A.F. Thurman holds the first endowed chair in Buddhist Studies in the West, the Hey Tsong Khapa Chair in Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies at Columbia University. He has studied Tibetan Buddhism for 30 years as a personal student of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and is President of Tibet House US. Thurman authored the national bestseller, Inner Revolution: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Real Happiness. In Anger Thurman offers an illuminating look at what he calls the deadliest of sins. Heated words, cool malice, the furious rush of adrenalin-anger is clearly a destructive passion that eliminates peace of mind and, at its worst, leads to murder, genocide, and war. Thurman believes that Eastern philosophy sees anger differently from the way the West sees it. Certainly it is a dreadful evil, one of the 'three poisons' that underlie all human suffering. But Buddhism teaches than anger can be overcome. Indeed, the defeat of anger is not only possible but also the only thing worth doing in a lifetime. He shows how we can go from being a slave to anger to becoming 'a knight of patience' when this corrosive emotion is transmuted by wisdom. Anger thus becomes a powerful force in freeing humans from suffering.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim and author of Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalists & Vietnam, will moderate the program.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsored with the USF Department of Theology and Religious Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences , the San Francisco Zen Center , and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning .



Tuesday, November 16, 2004, 
5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

...So Help Us God: The Presidents of the Philippines and Their Inaugural Addresses
A talk by the book's co-author, Philippine Consul General J. Eduardo Malaya

16 Nov 2004"Illuminating, instructive, and brilliant in conception, this book of Ed and Jonathan Malaya should be read by every concerned Filipino and every student of our turbulent and glorious history," says statesman and former President of the Philippine Senate, Jovito R. Salonga.

J. Eduardo Malaya, who has the rank of Career Minister in the Philippine Foreign Service, worked for four years in the Office of the Philippine President. He drafted foreign policy statements and papers for President Fidel Ramos from 1995 to 1998 as deputy to the Presidential Advisor for Foreign Affairs, and briefly assisted the succeeding President, Joseph Estrada. Malaya was previously assigned in New York, Brussels, and Chicago; he holds a law degree and a BA in economics from the University of the Philippines.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim and author of Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalists & Vietnam, will moderate the program.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsors: The Philippine Consulate General in San Francisco, FILIPINAS Magazine, the Filipino-American Center of the San Francisco Public Library, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning .


Thursday. November 4, 2004, 5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

Heavenly Dragons of China
A talk by Cynthia Ashley

4 November 2004

Cynthia Ashley, museum educator and exhibit manager for "Dragon Skies," has been at Chabot Space & Science Center for five years. She is the Project Director for their "Dragon Skies: Astronomy of Imperial China," an exhibit she helped develop over a three-year period and which will stay at its Oakland location until January 2, 2005.

In her slide lecture on "Dragon Skies: Astronomy of Imperial China" Ashley will present the significant contributions of Chinese astronomers during the Imperial Age of China under the Ming and Qin dynasties. Director Ashley will explore how the Imperial Chinese practiced their astronomical inquiries and why astronomy was a secret science. She will explain the tools Chinese star-gazers used to record their early sightings of comets, meteor showers, eclipses, novas, and sunspots. Since court officials in Beijing believed that events in the skies foretold what would happen on earth, they thought that creating an accurate calendar was a matter of dynastic life or death. In a time when an emperor's power depended on understanding the heavens, the rulers in the Forbidden City required accurate stellar data in much the same way that current leaders of the People's Republic of China rely on satellite communications. Beyond their scientific value, these Chinese instruments are elaborate works of arts, pleasing to the eye as well as the mind.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, will lead the discussion that follows Ashley's slide lecture. Dr. Hatcher recently visited the Ming tower-platform in Beijing where the court astronomers carried out their astronomical research.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsored with the Center's Ricci Institute, the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning, the Chinese Historical Society of America, and the Chabot Space & Science Center.


Wednesday, October 20, 2004, 5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 148
2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

Colossal Challenge
A Discussion with Niall Ferguson
Author Collosus: The Price of America's Empire

2004 20 OctoberNiall Ferguson returns to the USF Center for the Pacific Rim for the second year in a row. He holds the John Herzog Chair in Financial History at New York University, is Senior Research Fellow of Jesus College at Oxford University, a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and will soon join the faculty at Harvard. In 2003 the publication of Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order catapulted Ferguson into the debate as to whether the United States was or should be an empire. His answer remains "yes" to both questions as he makes clear in his new book on the impact of America's global struggle for the rule of law, representative government, and open markets. But he faults Washington leaders for a collective case of Attention Deficit Disorder, which prevents their paying attention to any foreign country long enough to have a positive effect, insisting interventions abroad are temporary. "They would rather build shopping malls than nations." The Economist has noted that Ferguson "combines a prodigious output with clear, fluent writing and the all-too-rare ability to blend economic analysis with that of politics." The Times Literary Supplement calls Colossus "a marvel of erudition, offering illuminating comparisons across the whole range of human history and experience."

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim and author of The Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalists & Vietnam, will interview Professor Ferguson.

Free and open to the public. Reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsored with the USF Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good, the World Affairs Council of Northern California, and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.



Tuesday, October 19, 2004,
5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 148
2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

Truth and Politics
A Talk by Amb. Joseph Wilson
Former Ambassador to Baghdad and author of The Politics of Truth

2004 19 October

Joseph Wilson had an unprecedented career as an American diplomat from 1976-1998 serving in both Democratic and Republican administrations and rising to the rank of ambassador. By chance he became America's acting ambassador in Baghdad just as Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990. The last American official to meet with Saddam Hussein before Desert Storm, he parried Saddam's threats to use American hostages as human shields and received a patriot's welcome by President George H. Bush on his homecoming, with Bush calling Wilson a "true American hero." Because of his experience in Africa, in 2002 the second Bush administration asked Wilson to investigate claims of yellow-cake uranium going to Iraq from Niger. Upon returning from that mission, Wilson reported that no evidence existed for such claims, which nevertheless made their way into the President's State of the Union message. When Wilson went public, senior officials retaliated against him and did the unthinkable by disclosing the CIA undercover status of Wilson's wife.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Distinguished Fellow at the Center for the Pacific Rim and author of The Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalists & Vietnam, will interview Ambassador Wilson.

Free and open to the public. Reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsored with the USF Law Student Bar Association, American Constitution Society, Equal Justice Society, La Raza, Labor and Employment Law Students Association, International Law Society, and the World Affairs Council of Northern California.



October 10 - 23, 2004

9:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. every day
Union Bank of California
350 California Street, San Francisco

Black Ships & Samurai: 1853-1854
A multimedia exhibit authored by John Dower

2004 Ships

On July 9, 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry anchored his naval force in Tokyo Bay. Local Samurai dubbed the five vessels Black Ships, so unfamiliar were they with steam-powered warships. Thus began a two-year saga in Japanese-American relations-the US trying to open Japan, Japan trying to keep itself isolated from the West.

This Black Ships & Samurai exhibit comes to San Francisco for two weeks October 10-23, 2004. Created at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the guidance of Professor John Dower, its Bay Area hosts are the University of San Francisco's Center for the Pacific Rim and the Japanese Consulate General in San Francisco.

Visitors will experience both the American and Japanese reactions to Perry's mission in three sections. Lithographs by Perry's official artist record the journey and encounter while a Japanese screen unfolds simultaneously to present their view of the intruders. Next the Commodore's steamships are romanticized in American painting while the Shogun's painters give a graphic portrait of demonic ships leering and belching black smoke. Then portraits and photographs appear: strangers trying to capture each other.

This exciting show both entertains and educates, illustrating two Pacific Rim peoples as they interact. The sponsors invite schools and universities to bring classes and community groups to visit the exhibit.

Free & Open to the Public. For more information call (415) 422-6357. Presented by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and the Consulate General of Japan. Cosponsored with the Stanford Program on International and Cross-cultural Education (SPICE), Stanford Institute for International Studies; Union Bank of California; the Japan Society of Northern California; Mechanics' Institute Library, and the Japanese Cultural & Community Center of Northern California.



Wednesday, October 13, 2004. 
5:45 p.m.

USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco

Cultures of War: Pearl Harbor, Hiroshima, 9-11
A Talk by John Dower

2004 towers

John Dower is America's premiere historian of post-WWII Japan and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Embracing Defeat and War without Mercy.

Free & Open to the Public. For more information AND RESERVATIONS call (415) 422-6357. Presented by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and the Consulate General of Japan. Cosponsored with the Stanford Program on International and Cross-cultural Education (SPICE), Stanford Institute for International Studies; Union Bank of California; the Japan Society of Northern California; Mechanics' Institute Library, and the Japanese Cultural & Community Center of Northern California.



Tuesday, October 12, 2004, 6:00 p.m.

Mechanics' Institute Library
57 Post Street, San Francisco

Perry's Mission to Japan and Its Impact
A Talk by John Dower

2004 Perry

On July 9, 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry anchored his naval force in Tokyo Bay. Local Samurai dubbed the five vessels Black Ships, so unfamiliar were they with steam-powered warships. Thus began a two-year saga in Japanese-American relations-the US trying to open Japan, Japan trying to keep itself isolated from the West.

John Dower is America's premiere historian of post-WWII Japan and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Embracing Defeat and War without Mercy.

Free & Open to the Public. For more information AND RESERVATIONS call (415) 422-6357. Presented by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and the Consulate General of Japan. Cosponsored with the Stanford Program on International and Cross-cultural Education (SPICE), Stanford Institute for International Studies; Union Bank of California; the Japan Society of Northern California; Mechanics' Institute Library, and the Japanese Cultural & Community Center of Northern California.




Wednesday, September 29, 2004, 5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco)

Majestic Mayan Courtly Art
A Talk by Kathleen Berrin, Curator in Charge of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas at the Fine Arts Museums of San Franciso

11 Feb 2004 Kathleen Berrin has been with the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco Since 1977. Pioneering projects under her direction have focused on pre-Columbian art. She edited Feathered Serpents and Flowering Trees, which focused on Mexico's murals at Teotihuacan, and The Spirit of Ancient Peru: Treasures from the Museo Arqueologico Rafael Larco Herrera. She directed international exhibitions of Latin American art for the Fine Arts Museums. Her current curated show, Courtly Art of the Ancient Maya (at the Legion of Honor from September 4, 2004 to January 2, 2005), covers this culture's influence across Central America and southern Mexico from the Caribbean to the Pacific. In 1986 Mexico's Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia celebrated her work on the Teotihuacan murals, and in 1998 she was awarded the Peruvian National Order of Merit for Distinguished Services.

 

Free & Open to the Public. For Information and reservations call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, (415) 422-6357. Cosponsored with the Pan American Society and the Fromm Institute of Lifelong Learning


 


Tuesday, August 31, 2004, 5:45 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
(2800 Turk Blvd. at Parker, San Francisco)

Geishas As Performance Artists: The Smiles Behind the Art
A Talk by Emily J. Sano, Ph.D., Director of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco and Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture

2004 MayanDr. Emily J. Sano became the Director of the Asian Art Museum in 1995. She spearheaded the 10-year project of renovating San Francisco's 1917 Beaux Arts library into the City's most acclaimed new museum. A former Fulbright-Hayes Fellow and Woodrow Wilson Fellow, she earned her Ph.D. in art history at Columbia University. Sano is an outspoken champion of the unique role that Asian art can play in building global understanding and peace. In 2003 she was honored as one of the 100 Most Influential Business Women in San Francisco and in 2004 the USF Center for the Pacific Rim awarded her its Asia Pacific Leadership Award.

In her slide lecture Sano will lead us behind the Geisha's painted smile, smiles which will remain on display at the Asian Art Museum through September 26, 2004.

Free & Open to the Public. For Information and reservations call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, (415) 422-6357. Cosponsored with The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco and Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture, the Japan Society of Northern California , and the Fromm Institute of Lifelong Learning.



Monday, 12 April 2004, 5:45 to 7:00 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
Turk at Parker in San Francisco

Mexico and California: A Pacific Rim Partnership for the Future
A moderated discussion with Consul General Georgina Lagos and Lt. Governor Leo T. McCarthy

 

12 Apr 2004Georgina Lagos, the first woman to serve as Consul General of Mexico in San Francisco, received her appointment from President Vicente Fox after serving on his transition team. A Mexico City native and university graduate, she earned a M.A. in Political Science at New York University. She has had a career in journalism as Managing Editor of Mexico's leading financial paper El Financiero International and in media and public relations for Mexico's top television network, Televisa. She played a key role in gaining recognition for the Mexican Consular ID as a valid piece of identification for Mexican immigrants in many California cities, San Francisco and Oakland being among the first. While serving in San Francisco Lagos saw Mexico overtake Japan as California's number one foreign market, with state exports to its southern partner topping $19 billion a year. With an estimated 5 million Mexicans living in California, legally and illegally, immigration became her greatest challenge. These immigrants send about $7 billion a year to their Mexican relatives, making these remittances the third largest source of foreign revenue after oil and tourism. She will share her views on these and other issues facing this critical Pacific partnership.

Leo T. McCarthy was Lieutenant Governor of the State of California from 1983 to 1995. He was a member of the California state assembly from 1969 to 1983 and the Speaker from 1975 to 1981.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, a Kiriyama Fellow at USF's Center for the Pacific Rim, will interview Lagos and McCarthy. He authored The Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalists in Vietnam (Stanford, 1990).

Cosponsored with The Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at USF, the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning, and the Pan American Society

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC: For reservations and information call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim (415) 422-6357.


 

 


Friday, 2 April 2004, 9:15 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 148
Turk at Parker in San Francisco

North Korea's Nuclear Crisis: A One-Day Conference

2004 nk9This conference of leading international scholars affords an opportunity to take stock of global concern about the nuclear crisis on the Korean Peninsula. Several relevant events in East Asia and elsewhere will be discussed, including the second round of six-nation talks in Beijing on the crisis itself, the recent presidential elections in Taiwan of March 20, the decision by Libya to abandon its nuclear weapons program, and the revelations of Pakistan's role in nuclear proliferation.

Participants will consider promising alternative ways to engage North Korea. Special emphasis will be given to South Korean perspectives and to the roles of China, Japan, and Russia in a successful resolution.


COST:
Conference with lunch (lunch reservations MUST be made in advance): $35.00
Conference only: $20.00
Students with ID, USF faculty and staff: Free

IMPORTANT NOTE: Parking will be SCARCE on the USF campus on the day of the conference due to several large events also happening on campus. Arriving early and getting street parking adjacent to the campus (where there are no posted 2-hour limits) is your best bet.

Sponsored by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim’s Kiriyama Chair. Cosponsors: The Asia Foundation; The Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley; The Intercultural Institute of California; The USF School of Law's Center for Global Law and Justice

To reserve your place or for more information, please email us, or call the Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357.


 


Thursday, 1 April 2004, 5:45 to 7:00 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
Turk at Parker in San Francisco

Korea: America's Next War?
An interview and book signing featuring Bruce Cumings, Ph.D., author of North Korea: Another Country

Cummings 2004The publication of Bruce Cumings' revisionist history of the Korean War, The Origins of the Korean War, caused a sensation when it first appeared. He followed with the equally successful Korea's Place in the Sun and Parallax Visions. Chalmers Johnson regards Cumings as "America's leading historian and political analyst of contemporary Korea." The New York Times says that Cumings' new book is "passionate, cantankerous, and fascinating." Business Week calls it "richly detailed, essential reading." Cumings presently holds the Norman and Edna Freehling Chair in history at the University of Chicago.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, who will interview Bruce Cumings, is a Kiriyama Fellow at USF's Center for the Pacific Rim and a defense specialist. He authored The Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalists in Vietnam (Stanford University Press, 1990).

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC: For reservations and information call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim (415) 422-6357.

Cosponsored with The Intercultural Institute of California and The Fromm Institute of Lifelong Learning.



 

Wednesday, 24 March 2004, 5:45 to 7:00 p.m.
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
Turk at Parker in San Francisco

Basketball Across the Pacific: Sports as a Source of Wisdom
Featuring USF and NBA Star Bill Cartwright and Oliver Chin, author of The Tao of Yao

2004 YaoOliver Chin turned his love of basketball into a book about a Shanghai-born athlete, all 7 feet 5 inches of Yao Ming. The talented Ming has jumped from the Pacific Coast of China to the Gulf of Mexico where he plays for the Houston Rockets. Along with his love of the game, Ming, an ambassador of Taoism, has brought a positive Chinese view of the athlete into modern society.

Bill Cartwright is USF's all-time leading scorer (2,116 points) and a three-time All American choice. He led USF to the #1 ranking in the nation. He has had a sixteen-year professional career after being drafted by the New York Knicks; he then won three NBA titles as a member of the Chicago Bulls. He was an assistant coach with the Chicago Bulls and Seattle Supersonics and then head coach of the Bulls in 2002-03.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; reservations recommended. Please call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357. Cosponsored with the USF Office of Alumni Relations and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.


 


Wednesday, 4 February 2004, 5:45 to 7:30 p.m.; Reception follows
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
Turk at Parker in San Francisco

Jesuit Asia, Past and Present: India, China, and Japan
A Charles W. Stewart Distinguished Lecture by Paul Rule, Ph.D.

Jesuit 2004Join Professer Paul Rule as he discusses early Jesuit encounters with indigenous religions and cultures in Asia, including special missions to tribal people in India-the Jesuit sannyasis, to the villages of minority peoples in rural China with sinologists and teachers of Sino-Christian meditation; and to Japan, where the exponents of Zen Christianity have continued the Jesuit tradition.

Paul Rule is currently Honorary Associate in the History Department at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia, where he retired as senior lecturer in history and religious studies in 2002, having taught there since 1973 as a specialist in Chinese history and and religion, Aboriginal religion, peace studies, and modern Catholicism. Since 2001 Rule spends part of each year in residence at the USF Ricci Institute as EDS-Stewart Distinguished Fellow where he is spearheading a research project on the Chinese Rites Controversy.

The Charles W. Stewart Distinguished Lectureship was established at the USF Center for the Pacific Rim to honor the memory of the late Charles W. Stewart, former CEO of Blue Shield and a friend, benefactor, and board member of the Center and its Ricci Institute.

Co-sponsored by the USF Center for the Pacific Rim and its Ricci Institute and the USF Jesuit Community. For further information call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357 or email pacrim@usfca.edu.


 


Wednesday, 28 January 2004, 5:45 p.m., reception following
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 148
Turk at Parker in San Francisco

An interview and book signing with Chalmers Johnson
Author of The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic

Empire 2004Chalmers Johnson's first book, Peasant Nationalism and Communist Power (Stanford, 1962) is now a recognized classic in Chinese studies. Eight books later MITI & the Japanese Miracle (Stanford, 1982) gained him the same renown for his insights of Japan. Three books later Johnson decided to retire from the University of California. By then he was the leading American scholar on East Asian affairs. Recognizing a need for policy studies to get quickly to interested participants, he launched his own research center, The Japan Policy Research Institute, of which he remains president. Johnson's work at his institute gave him a second career as a public intellectual. With his book Blowback (Metropolitan Books, 2000) Johnson touched a nerve at the center of the American strategic debate. Pulitzer-prize winning historian John Dower called it "far and away Johnson's most stunning and shocking book." The Sorrows of Empire continues that shock and awe.

Patrick Lloyd Hatcher, who will interview Chalmers Johnson, is a Kiriyama Fellow at USF's Center for the Pacific Rim and a defense specialist. He authored The Suicide of an Elite: American Internationalists in Vietnam (Stanford, 1990).

Cosponsored with The Japan Society of Northern California, The World Affairs Council of Northern California, The Asia Society, and The Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

We gratefully acknowledge the Koret Foundation for sponsoring this program.

Reservations recommended. For further information call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim at (415) 422-6357 or email pacrim@usfca.edu.



 

Tuesday, 17 February 2004, 5:45 to 7:30 p.m.; Reception follows
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
Turk at Parker in San Francisco

Afghanistan at the Crossroads: A Conversation between Novelist and Ambassador: Khaled Hosseini 
Author of The Kite Runner and Theodore L. Eliot, Jr. (U.S. Ambassador to Kabul 1973-1978)

17 Feb 2004Publishers Weekly calls The Kite Runner a "stunning debut novel that takes us from Afghanistan in the final days of the monarchy to the atrocities of the present." The New York Times found "Hosseini's depiction of pre-revolutionary Afghanistan rich in warmth and humor." Britain's Guardian calls it a "shattering novel...with a Shakespearean beginning to an epic tale that spans lives lived across two continents." The Times Literary Supplement calls it a "startling first novel that goes from exile in America to a clandestine return to Kabul in the grip of the Taliban." Born in Kabul in 1965, Hosseini's family received asylum in the U.S. in 1980.

Ambassador Theodore Eliot served 30 years in the U.S. Foreign Service including postings in Moscow, Tehran, and as Ambassador to Afghanistan, 1973-78. He was Dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University from 1978-85, then Director of the Center for Asian Pacific Affairs at The Asia Foundation in San Francisco from 1985-87.

Co-sponsored with The Asia Foundation and the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. For information and reservations, call the USF Center for the Pacific Rim, (415) 422-6357. or email pacrim@usfca.edu.


 


Wednesday, 11 February 2004, 5:45 to 7:30 p.m.; Reception follows
USF Lone Mountain Campus, Room 100
Turk at Parker in San Francisco

Sex and Love in Mystic india
Reading and book signing featuring Tim Ward, author of Arousing the Goddess: Sex and Love in the Buddhist Ruins of India

11 Feb 2004Tim Ward is the author of What the Buddha Never Taught, a bestseller in Canada and a Book-of-the-Month selection in the United States. The Toronto Star called his latest book, Arousing the Goddess, "diabolically funny at times, and also a brave, wise, and brilliant book." The Library Journal sees it as a "discourse on the purpose of tantric sex and of the goddess Kali's meaning in Hindu spirituality." The Globe and Mail salutes the book's "finely crafted prose, and Ward's honesty about what he learned." He spent six years in India wandering the Dharma trail visiting temples, desert ashrams, and mountain holy places, seeking monks and mystics. Here is wondrous India, spiritual love and secular lust, masculine-feminine embedment.

Cosponsored with the FROMM Institute for Lifelong Learning. FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

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