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Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Course List

ADVT  340 - Advertising Creative Strategy and Copy (4)

Prerequisite: COMS - 202. This course provides a practical understanding of the ad-making process with emphasis on a strategic approach to copywriting. Students learn to create effective communication strategies for specific audiences with the goal of forming or changing opinions and attitudes. Offered every Fall.

ADVT  341 - Advertising Principles and Practice (4)

This course surveys advertising as communication and examines its place in a free society where corporate rhetoric best serves the community when ethically sound. Areas covered: history, the modern marketplace, societal effects, best practices, creativity, communication, ad placement and critical evaluation.

ADVT  342 - Advertising Presentations (4)

Prerequisite: ADVT - 341. Offers a practical understanding of the communication dynamics of an advertising agency. Students create, write and present a comprehensive campaign for a real-world client, then enter their campaigns in the National Student Advertising Competition, where professionals in the advertising industry evaluate and provide valuable feedback on their work. Offered every Spring.

ADVT  343 - Advertising Planning and Placement (4)

Prerequisite: ADVT - 341. This course studies the placement of advertising as "communication," rather than merely creating "exposure" to a message as it relates to the advertising/marketing process. Topic areas covered include: terminology, research and analysis, resources and evaluation of placement as to ethics, audience and message.

ADVT  344 - Advertising and Social Media (4)

Advertising is commonly known as the art of persuasive communication, not a force for social justice. However, a growing number of communications professionals, especially those representing nonprofit organizations and government agencies, are using a process known as social marketing to encourage behavior change that benefits society. This course will examine how the tools and concepts of commercial marketing – which encourages consumers to choose iPod over other MP3 players, Target over Kmart, or Levi’s over Wrangler – can be used to influence behaviors such as using alternative transportation, practicing safe sex or getting out the vote.

ADVT  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

One-time offerings of special interest courses in the field of advertising.

ADVT  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

The written permission of the instructor, the program director, and the dean is required. Offered every semester.

ADVT  496 - (4)

Prerequisite: completion of 12 units of Professional Development coursework in Communication Studies or ADVT 341. Field experience in a setting that relates communication study to the student's professional goals. Students may count no more than four (4) units of Internship credit toward the major. Offered every semester.

AEM  100 - Success at USF:Univ/Class Cult (3)

This Jumpstart course is designed to help USF conditionally-admitted students improve their academic English and build their competence in understanding USF and U.S. university culture in order to be more successful when they begin studies in the U.S. Many adult students of English have had opportunities before coming to the U.S. to study formal features of the English language, but they have not had much chance to use those skills extensively for communicative academic purposes. For this reason, this course is designed to resemble a U.S. university course. In other words, students will be expected to learn the content of the course.

AEM  101 - US Cult:Understand/Neg New Lan (3)

This Jumpstart course is designed to help USF conditionally-admitted students in China improve their academic English and build their competence in understanding aspects of U.S. culture that are relevant for their cultural adjustment to living and studying in the U.S., and USF in particular. The orientation of the course will be to take a social-psychological view of life in society more broadly as the foundation for understanding and negotiating differences between the students' countries and U.S. culture.

AEM  102 - USF Orientation Online (1)

This course is designed to help international students fully-admitted to USF to get a head start in becoming familiar with the academic writing expectations. This one credit course will provide new international undergraduate students with the writing process, academic written genre, and the appropriate use of sources while getting to know a USF faculty member and other new international students. This one-credit course will include both synchronous and asynchronous online components.

AEM  103 - Strat. for Academic Writing (1)

This course is designed to help USF conditionally-admitted students to get a head start in becoming familiar with the expectations, procedures, policies, and resources of USF before they arrive on campus. Students will get to know a USF faculty member before they arrive, as well as a better understanding of how to make a successful transition to academic life at USF. This one-credit course will include both synchronous and asynchronous online components.

ANST  101 - First Semester Filipino/Tagalog (4)

First Semester Filipino introduces students to the basic structure of the Philippine national language, its development, grammatical characteristics, and to learn basic "survival" Filipino vocabulary. It also exposes students to important Filipino non-verbal discourse and communication patterns.

ANST  102 - Second Semester Chinese (4)

Prerequisite: CHIN - 101 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of CHIN 101. Offered every Spring.

ANST  103 - First Semester Japanese (4)

This course will introduce basic Japanese grammar, vocabulary, and writing systems (katakana and hiragana), together with some relevant aspects of Japanese culture. Emphasis on developing communicative conversational skills. Offered every Fall.

ANST  104 - Second Semester Japanese (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 101 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of JAPAN 101. Some basic kanji will be introduced. The course will focus on developing conversational skills and reading/writing skills. Offered every Spring.

ANST  105 - Third Semester Japanese (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 102 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of JAPAN 102. This course will develop communicative conversational skills and reading and writing skills and will familiarize the student with Japanese grammar, vocabulary, and kanji. Offered every Fall.

ANST  106 - Intermediate Japanese (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 202 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of JAPAN 202. This course will provide extensive practice for conversation, reading, and writing to consolidate the student's language skills. Offered every Fall.

ANST  107 - First Semester Chinese (4)

Intensive grammar, composition, conversation, reading. Stress on spoken language. Offered every Fall.

ANST  108 - Third Semester Chinese (4)

Prerequisite: CHIN - 102 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of CHIN 102. Offered every Fall.

ANST  109 - Third Year Chinese (4)

Prerequisite: CHIN - 202 or equivalent. Develops intermediate-to-advanced-level skills in oral and written expression, and introduces modern literary Chinese through texts such as newspapers, short stories, and essays.

ANST  110 - Traditional Chinese Culture (CD) (4)

A history of the literati arts of landscape and bird and flower painting, calligraphy, and zither music, along with closely affiliated pursuits such as poetry, garden design, religious or literary pilgrimage, and philosophical contemplation. The impact of literati culture on Japan, Korea, and elsewhere is also covered.

ANST  113 - Intro to Int'l Politics (4)

This course provides an introduction to the field of international relations. Students will critically assess the competing conceptual/theoretical issues and debates in the field, analyze the origins and evolution of the post-war global order, the legacy of the cold war on the international system, and the challenges for global peace and security in the emerging new world order. Offered every year.

ANST  130 - East Asian Civilization (CD) (4)

Introductory survey of the four East Asian civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, and the Asian area of Russia. The course offers a selective treatment of key issues and important achievements of these societies. Its methodology is historical, analyzing the political, economic, social, and cultural institutions as they have developed from antiquity to the present. The emphasis will be on the modern period, primarily after the middle of the nineteenth century. Junior or Senior standing advised. Offered every semester.

ANST  135 - Hist of South and Southeast Asia (4)

A broad survey of South and Southeast Asian history from antiquity to modern times. Beginning with the rise of the Indus valley civilization, the course considers topics like European colonialism and imperialism, nationalism, and the post-independence period. Offered intermittently.

ANST  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ANST  201 - Third Sem Filipino/Tagalog (4)

Prerequisite: ANST 102 or permission of instructor. This course introduces non-native speakers to an advanced understanding and comprehension of the Filipino language, its development, and grammatical characteristics. It exposes students to advanced-level Filipino discourse, exchange, and vocabulary using a functional-situational and culture-media immersion approaches. It also immerses advanced level students to simple and complex Filipino verbal and non-verbal communication patterns.

ANST  205 - Barrio Fiesta: Introduction (2)

This course is an introductory immersion to the social, arts, cultural, political, linguistic, and historical experiences of the Filipino/a as Asians and as Americans through the "Barrio Fiesta" a Philippine Cultural Night (PCN). Performance, promotion, and/or production participation is mandatory.

ANST  206 - Barrio Fiesta: Performance (2)

This unique Philippine studies course focuses on Filipino and Asian American performing arts and social justice. It is an advanced immersion to the social, arts, political, cultural, linguistic, and historical experiences of Filipinos. Participation in the annual Spring Barrio Fiesta promotion, performance, and production is mandatory. YPSP 206 builds on and integrates the conceptual and cultural learning from YPSP 205 Barrio Fiesta: Introduction as well as other YPSP courses.

ANST  211 - Asian American Lit Survey (4)

This course introduces students to Asian American experiences through writings and films by Asians in America (including Chinese, Filipino/a, Japanese, Korean, Southeast Asian, South Asian, and Pacific Islanders--both immigrants and U.S.-born), from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Students analyze the evolution of Asian American consciousness expressed through their writings, raising historical and political issues such as acculturation processes, intergroup relations, media representation, race, culture, gender, sexuality, identity and Third World politics.

ANST  214 - Asian Musical Cultures (CD) (4)

This course explores musics of various Asian cultures and musics of Asian Americans. Students will attend concerts, develop listening skills, and investigate these musics' aesthetics, meanings, and sociological contexts.

ANST  217 - Asian Art (CD) (4)

This course helps students build an understanding and appreciation of the visual arts of China, Japan, and India. Lectures illustrated with slides and museum visits.

ANST  220 - Asian Philosophy (4)

This course examines both the historical development and contemporary debates of the philosophical traditions of Asia. The topics include metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical questions raised in Indian, Chinese, Buddhist, and Japanese philosophies. References will also be made to the larger cultural and political issues that are relevant in these traditions today. Offered regularly.

ANST  222 - Philippine Boxing and Culture (2)

This is a non-contact Philippine boxing course that introduces students to the history, art, and science of the Filipino/a boxer's workout, exercise, technique, and routines. It focuses primarily on the physical conditioning, protocols, rituals, and self-defense aspects of boxing as influenced by Philippine culture and Filipino traits, behavior, psyche, and antics. A physicians¿ certificate is required. All students are required to consult his/her physician before beginning this or any other USF fitness, sports, and exercise oriented course.

ANST  230 - Cities and Society (4)

An introduction to the historical development and social structure of cities; their changing historical importance in the growth of social, economic, and political life; and their crucial role in the political economy of a global society. Offered in Fall.

ANST  250 - Filipino Music and Theology (2)

Philippine Spirituality and Music investigates the numerous ways in which music is embedded in the world—particularly its influence on spirituality and society as a whole. The course delves into the intersections of music with the fields of philosophy, religious studies, and sociology. It also explores various musical traditions in the Philippines and the Filipino diaspora, while the class collaborates in rigorous discussion, analysis, and performance of these musical traditions and how they correlate with the course’s theories.

ANST  251 - Philippine Dance and Culture (4)

This course studies the culture, tradition, politics, and development of Philippine dances and rituals through a variety of methods: lecture/discussion, videos, live performance, and movement classes.

ANST  260 - Filipino American and Philippine Literature (2)

Filipino American and Philippine Literature is a unique Philippine literature survey course where students will read and discuss short works of fiction, essay, and poetry written by Filipina/o writers in English. They will also critically analyze literature as art and document, and the writers as cultural historians humanizing the supposedly objective details of academic texts. The course starts at the very beginning of the Filipino relationship with English. Moving through history into the present day, the course expands into writings by the Philippines and Filipinos in diaspora.

ANST  270 - Sex and TransgressionIslWrld (4)

This course explores sexuality and transgression in the pre-modern, colonial, and modern Muslim world including the Ottoman and Qajar Empires, and the modern Middle East.

ANST  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ANST  301 - Philippine History:to 1900(CD) (4)

The course provides a general introduction to the social, economic, and political history of the Philippines from the early times (i.e. pre-Spanish period) to the Spanish colonial period(1565-1898). The lectures and readings highlight the various aspects of local-indigenous culture before the advent of Spanish colonization, and how the meshing of Spanish-Catholic culture with the local one help explain what is known today as "Philippine culture." The course also includes a discussion on some of the more recent themes in Philippine historical studies, such as gender, identity, and the role of nationalist discourse in shaping historical writing. In addition, a number of original documents, essays, and visual-arts materials, including the reading of Noli Me Tangere (a satirical novel written by Philippine national hero José Rizal) are included to provide the students with a more direct feel for earlier eras.

ANST  303 - Law, Immigration and Filipinos (4)

The course examines the legal history of Asian Americans in the United States, focusing on critical topics like immigration, citizenship and naturalization, and the movements against economic and social discrimination. The course also explores the role of dominant groups that utilize the U.S. judicial and legal system as a tool of oppression and the reactions and actions of subordinate groups which use the same system as an instrument towards achieving equality, social justice, and civil rights. Finally, the course looks at the relevance of popular attitudes in the shaping of law in the United States. 

ANST  306 - Asian Art (CD) (4)

This course helps students build an understanding and appreciation of the visual arts of China, Japan, and India. Lectures illustrated with slides and museum visits.

ANST  307 - Cross-Cultural Psychology (4)

Prerequisite: PSY - 101 or permission of instructor. This course increases understanding of the similarities and differences among cultures through experimental evidence, group experience, and class discussion. Offered every year.

ANST  310 - Philippine History: 1900-Present (CD) (4)

Philippine History from 1900 to Present focuses on the political and socio-economic history of the Philippines from the end of the colonial Spanish period (1898), right through the US colonial period and the "Americanization" of the Philippines, the Japanese occupation, the establishment of the Philippine Republic, the martial law years, and the EDSA revolutions. The course also includes in-depth discussions and analyses of important themes, such as colonialism, nationalism, poverty, Muslim-Christian conflicts, globalization, and the pursuit of democracy. Tours to museums/exhibits on Filipinos and the Philippines, as well as films complement the learning experiences in the classroom.

ANST  312 - Knowledge Activism (SL) (2)

Knowledge Activism Iis an introductory course in activism focusing on Filipino and Asian American communities. The course explores issues that are paramount to the Filipino American community, as well as the Asian American community in general.

ANST  316 - Filipino American Arts (CD) (4)

This combined studio and cultural history course offers a survey of Filipino American artistic production,looking at visual art, literature, music, and performance. The goal of the course is for students to develop their own artistic voice in response to histories of colonization, transnationalism, and globalization. Cross-listed with ART 316.

ANST  318 - Indian Cinema (4)

Prerequisite: MS 102 or MS 200. Examines the institutions, texts, and audiences of the National ("Bollywood") and regional cinemas of India in the postcolonial context.

ANST  322 - Globalization and Resistance (4)

This course examines social, economic, political and cultural dimensions of globalization from a sociological perspective. Theoretical approaches to the globalization thesis, neo-liberalism, and the decline of the nation-state are analyzed along with case studies of transnational movements of resistance that include workers, students, women, indigenous peoples, and environmentalists. Offered intermittently.

ANST  323 - Filipino Politics and Justice (SL/CD) (4)

A survey of the Filipino political and economic experiences and issues in and out of the Philippines. It examines classic and contemporary issues being discussed and engaged by Filipinos in the Philippines and in their diasporic communities found in Asia and all over the world. Discussion topics include: patronage, empowerment, ethnicity, land ownership, poverty and crime, church power, cronyism, corruption, and the historical, economic, political, and social dimensions of the Filipino diaspora.

ANST  325 - Filipino Culture and Society(CD) (4)

This course is an introductory survey of the Filipino social and cultural experiences. It encompasses concepts and issues encountered by Filipinos in the Philippines and in their diasporic communities. Discussion topics include: class and kinship formation, values, behavior and psychology, languages, literature, religion, food, music, art, dance, ethnic minorities, education, gender and the Filipinazation of the United States.

ANST  327 - Migration and Diversity in East Asia (CD) (4)

East Asia is often mistakenly characterized as a culturally homogeneous region in popular discourse. However, this region has a long history of migration, which has been an important driving force in enriching their cultural diversity. This course examines the history and politics of internal and transnational migration in China, Korea and Japan from the 19th century to the 21st century. This course offers a comparative exploration of how migration impacts various aspects of each society, such as social inequality, ethno-racial identities, nationality and citizenship, gender and family, and political economy. This course investigates how the colonial past and globalization connect these regional powers and influence public attitudes and policies toward migration and diversity today.

ANST  333 - Boxing and Social Justice (SL/CD) (4)

Boxing and Social Justice is a unique combined recreational sports, cultural diversity, and service learning course. After the fundamentals of Filipino studies are reviewed and reinforced, students will be trained to teach boxing as a recreational and self-defense activity to at-risk new migrant populations in the San Francisco Bay Area. They will act as mentors, tutors, and service providers. Immersed at their service learning sites, students will reflect on the health, recreational, social, economic, and political issues new migrants to the United States face. Prerequisite: YPSP 222: Philippine Boxing and Culture or instructor’s permission.

ANST  341 - Balinese Dance and Culture (CD) (4)

Through study of the dances of Bali we examine the arts in contemporary Balinese life, along with the various historical and socio-political forces that have influenced its evolution. Lecture/discussion format, videos, and classes in Balinese music and dance.

ANST  342 - China Today:Immersion (CD/SL) (4)

Course is taught in China.

ANST  345 - Asians and Lawmaking (4)

This course delves into laws, lawmaking, and the politico-legal systems of selected Asian countries. It examines a sampling of Asian states in the context of their historical and traditional heritage vis-a-vis the sweeping changes that are driven by globalization and democratization. The organization and administration of the courts and judicial system in each country will be discussed. Comparative analysis will be made with the United States and Asian American legal issues.

ANST  346 - Government and Politics of South and Southeast Asia (4)

A comparative political study of India, Pakistan, Malaysia, the Philippines, and other South/Southeast Asian states, focusing on state-society relations, the military, religion, race, ethnicity, culture, nationalism, and the challenges for economic development and nation-building. Offered every other year.

ANST  350 - Japanese Culture (CD) (4)

This course will introduce essential aspects of Japanese culture. It is taught in English and may be repeated for credit when different topics are treated. Offered every other Fall.

ANST  355 - Chinese Lit in Translation (4)

An introduction to significant examples of classical and modern literature, with emphasis on fiction, drama, and poetry (shi and ci).

ANST  356 - Japanese Lit/Translation (CD) (4)

This course will introduce the classics of Japanese literature as well as works by the Nobel laureates. The course is taught in English. Offered every Spring.

ANST  358 - International Relations of South and Southeast Asia (4)

A study of the post-war foreign relations of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, and other selected countries of post-war South/Southeast Asia. An analysis of nonalignment, Cold War impacts, Indo-Pakistani conflicts, Sino-Indian disputes, SEATO, ASEAN, SAARC, APEC and intra-regional issues. Offered every other year.

ANST  366 - Religion and Spirituality/Asia (4)

A survey of major religious traditions-- Hinduism, Daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and Christianity--that have helped shape the societies and cultural identities of Asian peoples.

ANST  369 - Asian Politics, Activism and Justice (SL/CD) (4)

Asia Advocacy and Activism is a unique USF service learning and cultural diversity fieldwork course that immerses the student in advocacy, action, and activism among San Francisco¿s Asia and Asian American social justice organizations. The first part of the course discusses critical issues concerning international and transnational relations of Asia and Asian Americans. The second part exposes students to the influence and consequences of the Asian diasporas through Asiatown ethnotours and fieldwork activities. The third part of the course requires the student to perform faculty supervised political action, community advocacy, or public service that relates directly to the social justice worlds of Asians in North America and elsewhere.

ANST  370 - International Economics (4)

Introduction to the theory and policy of international trade and international economic relations. Course also covers areas of migration, international corporations, and investment. Offered every Fall.

ANST  379 - Buddhist Paths (SL) (4)

This course will tour the centuries as we try to understand the traditions, people, teachings, rituals, cultures, and allure of diverse "Buddhisms" in the world today. Of particular concern will be local Buddhist institutions and their global links to Buddhist communities and traditions, near and far. Offered every other year.

ANST  381 - Himalayan Religions and Cultures (CD) (4)

This course explores contemporary religions and cultures of the Himalayan regions such as Tibet, Nepal, and northern parts of India. We will examine the relationship between the local peoples and their sacred spaces, between societies and their shamanic healers, and between celibate virtuoso and non-celibate ritual specialists. It is through such analysis that students will learn how religions such as Buddhism, Bon, Hinduism, and shamanic healing practices shape the lives of the sturdy Himalayan people and how they in turn give new meanings to their cultures and societies.

ANST  383 - Modern Japan Since Perry (4)

A survey of Japan's history after 1868, emphasizing its rapid modernization and its rise to great power status. Offered every other year.

ANST  384 - The Rise of China Since Mao (4)

A comprehensive survey of the enormous changes, yet also important continuities, in China's domestic and foreign policy since 1978. Important themes include the transition to a market economy or "market Leninism"; environmental impacts and the sustainability of growth; population policy; military modernization and the "China threat" scenario; village democracy and human rights issues; changing attitudes to sex and sexuality; and the search for values both new and traditional. Offered every other year.

ANST  387 - History of U.S.-Japan Relations (4)

Consideration of a broad variety of political, social, economic, and cultural issues concerning America's relationship with Japan, beginning with Commodore Perry's visit in 1853 and including contemporary economic and security concerns. Offered every other year.

ANST  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

ANST  396 - Public Admin Internship (SL) (4)

Students do interesting work six to ten hours per week in a federal, state, or municipal agency, giving them a chance to strengthen their skills, and network. They will prepare journal themes, read relevant assigned material, and meet every two weeks in a seminar. Permission of the instructor required. Offered every semester.

ANST  398 - Directed Reading and Research (1 - 4)

ANST  409 - International/Global Media (4)

Prerequisite: Completion of 200-level requirements. Analysis of structures and content of international media and role of culture in globalization.

ANST  410 - Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (4)

This course aims to develop linguistic knowledge about the Japanese language. The course will focus on understanding the Japanese language in terms of history, lexicon, phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics, and sociolinguistics. Such linguistic training provides essential background for teaching Japanese. Offered every Spring.

ANTH  190 - Special Topics in Anthropology (4)

ANTH  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ANTH  200 - Introduction to Anthropology (CD) (4)

An introduction to the discipline of anthropology -- the study of human societies - with an emphasis on socio-cultural anthropology, the subfield of anthropology dealing with the study of human society and culture.

ANTH  204 - Communication and Culture (CD) (4)

This introduction to the field of communication examines how cultures and sub-cultures differ in their language use, and how their communicative practices shape the production, interpretation, and reproduction of social meanings.

ANTH  210 - Cultures Through Film (CD) (4)

This course explores non-Western cultures as they are portrayed in ethnographic film. The course introduces students to ethnographic film--both its history and the work of some of its leading practitioners--and to the broad range of cultures and issues that are the subjects of these films.

ANTH  215 - Women's Lives/Cultures (CD) (4)

This course looks at contemporary women's lives and the special circumstances they face in different economic and cultural settings, including practices like polygyny, female genital cutting, and veiling. Also looks at women's strengths, strategies, and collective efforts to effect change and produce better societies.

ANTH  220 - Intro Urban Agriculture (4)

Introduction to global, national, and local urban agriculture.

ANTH  225 - The Museum, Society and Culture (4)

This course explores the role museums (especially history and natural history museums) play in society and the range of issues they face in conserving and presenting cultural and historical materials to the public. Topics include the politics of representation, collecting practices, intellectual property rights and repatriation, displaying culture, and working with diverse publics. Will include visits to area museums.

ANTH  230 - Anthropology and Global Health (4)

Is health a basic human right? How is illness related to social inequality, poverty, and political conflict across the world? Are pandemics increasing in frequency and severity? This introductory course reviews cross-disciplinary approaches to the new field of global health and focuses on the unique contributions of anthropology to reveal the social, political, and cultural forces that underlie international patterns of health and disease.

ANTH  235 - The Anthropology of Food: Culture, Class, Power and Change (4)

Why do we eat what we eat? This exciting new course explores the myriad ways that different societies and cultures across the world produce, value, and consume food. We will learn how food practices and rituals are changing with globalization, new technologies, and a faster pace of life. Through films, readings, and fieldwork, students will engage with the current debates about the sociocultural, political, and ecological contexts of food.

ANTH  240 - Sport, Culture and Society (4)

How is sport linked to institutions of society? What role does sport play in transmitting values to youth? Does sport perpetuate gender-role stereotypes? These questions are explored while using sport as a vehicle for understanding culture patterns and social problems in society.

ANTH  250 - Global Cities: Cultures and Communities (4)

The course explores the city from anthropological perspective. Specific topics include urban migration and urbanization, rural-urban differences, neighborhoods and ethnic groups, urban planning, global cities, and how people negotiate urban life as a particular socio-cultural world.

ANTH  280 - Alaska: Culture, Environment and Tourism (SL) (4)

This 17-day, 4-credit Arrupe Justice immersion course in anthropology and environmental studies examines the relationship between culture and the environment in the unique island setting of Sitka, Alaska. Students will learn about the region’s terrestrial and marine environments, its occupation and use by the indigenous Tlingit population and by non-Native peoples, and contemporary controversies surrounding the appropriate use of its natural resources – its fish, timber, and natural beauty. The focus will be on experiential learning, beginning with a 3-day trip up the Inland Passage abroad an Alaska Marine Highway ship. All students are welcome to apply; especially suited for Anthropology and Environmental Studies students.

ANTH  290 - Special Topics in Anthropology (4)

ANTH  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ANTH  303 - Race, Ethnicity and Media (CD) (4)

Prerequisite: Junior status. A survey of the relationship between diverse racial/ethnic groups and the media within the context of the United States. It explores representation and diversity in popular media, racial equity in media industries, and ethnic minorities as audiences and as independent producers.

ANTH  305 - Anthropology of Music (CD) (4)

This course introduces students to ethnomusicology, the study of music using anthropological methods, using case studies of music from selected traditions from around the world. We will explore various modes of engagement with music by analyzing academic texts, doing in-class listening and performance labs, and participating in fieldwork research in the SF Bay Area.

ANTH  330 - Anthropology and Global Health (4)

Is health a basic human right? How is illness related to social inequality, poverty, and political conflict across the world? Are pandemics increasing in frequency and severity? This introductory course reviews cross-disciplinary approaches to the new field of global health and focuses on the unique contributions of anthropology to reveal the social, political, and cultural forces that underlie international patterns of health and disease.

ANTH  335 - Anthropology of Food (4)

Why do we eat what we eat? This exciting new course explores the myriad ways that different societies and cultures across the world produce, value, and consume food. We will learn how food practices and rituals are changing with globalization, new technologies, and a faster pace of life. Through films, readings, and fieldwork, students will engage with the current debates about the sociocultural, political, and ecological contexts of food.

ANTH  340 - Balinese Dance and Culture (CD) (4)

Through study of the dances of Bali we examine the arts in contemporary Balinese life, along with the various historical and socio-political forces that have influenced its evolution. Lecture/discussion format, videos, and classes in Balinese music and dance.

ANTH  350 - Urban Anthropology (4)

The course explores the city from anthropological perspective. Specific topics include urban migration and urbanization, rural-urban differences, neighborhoods and ethnic groups, urban planning, global cities, and how people negotiate urban life as a particular socio-cultural world.

ANTH  366 - Ethnography of Comm (SL) (4)

Students in this seminar will explore the communicative practices of various organizations concerned with social justice. Readings from cultural and communication theory will provide the conceptual background for their fieldwork.

ANTH  390 - Special Topics (4)

ANTH  395 - Fieldwork in Sociology (SL) (4)

This course combines 90-100 hours of volunteer or internship work in the San Francisco Bay Area; reading-based discussion of fieldwork research techniques, ethics, and writing; and classroom workshop discussions of students' projects. Requirements include weekly class meetings; extensive written field notes; class presentations; commentaries on other students' projects; literature review; and a final paper. It is highly recommended that students take Research Methods before enrolling in this course.

ANTH  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Written permission of instructor and dean is required. Offered intermittently.

ARAB  101 - First Semester Arabic (4)

This course introduces students to modern standard Arabic (MSA) and the diverse cultures of the Arab-speaking world. In addition to acquiring basic reading, writing and conversational skills, students will be introduced to Arabic grammar within a lively and communicative context. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

ARAB  102 - Second Semester Arabic (4)

Building on Arabic 101, Arabic 102 reinforces and develops the students' acquired skills. The students will gain more confidence in Arabic conversation, as well as read, understand and write more advanced Arabic. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

ARAB  190 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

ARAB  201 - Third Semester Arabic (4)

ARAB  390 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

ARAB  398 - Directed Reading (1 - 4)

ARCD  100 - Introduction to Architecture and Community Design (2)

Architecture and community design encompasses diverse forms of engagement with society and the environment. Each of these raises important questions about the principles, purpose, and practice of architecture. Through lectures, readings, and walking tours, we will explore these questions and establish a solid foundation for continuing academic study in the ARCD program.

ARCD  101 - History of Architecture 1 (2)

This is the first semester of a two-year sequence, which provides conceptual and analytical tools to understand the morphology of buildings and cities. Social justice, underserved communities and developing regions of the world are equally emphasized alongside the more traditional view of focusing on the "great buildings" in history.

ARCD  102 - History of Architecture 2 (2)

This is the second semester of a two-year sequence, which provides the conceptual and analytical tools to interpret the morphology of the built environment from the macro scale of cities to the micro scale of buildings. The social role and cultural significance of architecture is explored alongside the formal and technological aspects of the discipline.

ARCD  104 - Fabrication Lab (0 - 1)

Art + Architecture Fabrication Lab, a required course for students majoring in Architecture, Fine Arts and Design, offers students supervised professional construction and safety training using the Fabrication tools and equipment. Students complete a variety of practical construction-based projects to develop and practice proper material and tool use. The conceptual, theoretical and practical instruction received in this course will prepare students for studio based course work and provide future access to the tools and labs in the Department of Art + Architecture.

ARCD  105 - Art and ARCD Fabrication Lab (0 - 1)

Art + Architecture Fabrication Lab, a required course for students majoring in Architecture, Fine Arts and Design, offers students supervised professional construction and safety training using the Fabrication tools and equipment. Students complete a variety of practical construction-based projects to develop and practice proper material and tool use. The conceptual, theoretical and practical instruction received in this course will prepare students for studio based course work and provide future access to the tools and labs in the Department of Art + Architecture.

ARCD  110 - Architecture Studio 1 (4)

Students are introduced to all the major drawing conventions, learning to coordinate a range of drawing types and techniques from free-hand sketching to drafting by hand and with computer. The course begins with contour drawing (line weight, overlap, scale), then tone drawing (shade and shadow), then orthographic projection and perspective. It is a learning to observe and represent what you see kind of course and is preparatory for the more advanced design studios. Students are expected to keep a sketchbook, which they may use in conjunction with other courses, as a place to examine various forms of representation as part of their design process.

ARCD  120 - Architecture Studio 2 (4)

Students will engage in an active interrogation of the city, understanding its structure and patterns and simultaneously uncovering the social imperatives of its residents. They will learn how to use the tools and conventions of representation and apply them creatively and rigorously in the examination of the city at different scales and in varying contexts. Through small-scale design projects, students will evolve designs based on research and exploration and a critical reading of the built environment that takes into account aspects of ecology and landscape.

ARCD  130 - Comm Based Urban Agriculture (4)

This is an introductory course to the art, science and practical implementation of community gardening techniques. Students study local community-supported agriculture programs, analyze different models for urban garden projects, and develop and hold community garden design meetings. Based on research, field trips, first-hand study of the university garden site and hosting of university-wide meetings, students will produce a draft proposal for the university garden by the end of the semester.

ARCD  150 - Architectonics 1 (2)

The intention of this course is to develop an understanding of architectonics. Lectures and studio projects explore the concepts of dimension, scale, and order. Design investigations are assigned to develop methods for analysis, articulation of space, relationships of scale, and clarity of structure.

ARCD  151 - Architectonics 2 (2)

Architectonics will focus on improving both representational and conceptual skills, viewing their mastery as interdependent. Three core semester projects will provide a framework for investigating how to conceptualize, construct, and represent complex architectural space. Our projects will not necessarily begin with a priori concepts, but with a theme, collective and personal, that is to be investigated through construction and representation.

ARCD  190 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

ARCD  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ARCD  200 - Sustainable Design (4)

This course will provide an interdisciplinary overview of Sustainable Design by presenting a historical and contemporary overview of ecological living practices through lecture, readings, guest speakers, and field trips. Topics include: Bioregion assessments, Sustainable communities, Environmental and Social justice, Permaculture, Native Science, Biomimicry, Urban Gardens and Food Security, Ecoliteracy and Primary Education, Global Economies, Environmental Preservation and Restoration vs. Development, The Global Environment, Impact of Developed Countries consumptive patterns, City Planning, and Green Business and Manufacturing.

ARCD  203 - History of Architecture 3 (2)

This is the third semester of a two-year sequence, which examines architectural production, drawing from significant precedents from antiquity to the present. Social, political, economic and cultural issues of cities and buildings are equally emphasized, as are formal and technological processes.

ARCD  204 - History of Architecture 4 (2)

This is the fourth semester of a two-year sequence that studies building typologies and urban patterns using the example of the world's cities and their histories. Cities and buildings resulting from the dominance of wealth and power are important, but so too are settlement patterns, streets, buildings, homes and gardens of all peoples through history.

ARCD  220 - Landscape Arch Studio (2)

The landscape architecture studio provides students with the opportunity to explore landscape ideas through an iterative design process: site analysis and observation, informal interviews of users, critical thinking, and a final synthesis of information. Through class discussions, walking tours, sketchbook investigations, site observation and informal interviews, students will develop a landscape design proposal and verbally and graphically communicate their ideas for specific campus sites.

ARCD  230 - Architecture Studio 3 (4)

This studio introduces students to design issues at different scales of urban complexity. In part one of the studio, students explore the "grain" of the city--the individual dwelling unit--its history, place and relationship to the larger urban fabric. In part 2, they continue to examine aspects of living in the city through design projects that deal with multi-family housing and issues of affordability and social justice.

ARCD  240 - Architecture Studio 4 (4)

Through a consideration of land use, housing, natural resources, environmental factors, aesthetics and comfort, students will develop a critique of the architecture on the urban fringe. Students will be introduced to alternative methods of design and building in contrast to accepting normative practices as a given. They will be introduced to vernacular, contemporary and renewable construction methods and how they relate to building type, location, life-cycle and design issues. Students will develop individual projects, which follow the design process from schematice presentation through design development and basic construction documents.

ARCD  250 - Computer Aided Design and Drawing (4)

CADD 1 is an introductory course in Computer Aided Design and Drawing in VectorWorks, a CADD program for both the Mac and PC platforms that integrates 2D, 3D, and hybrid objects in the same drawing. The class will cover both line drawing and 3D modeling techniques.

ARCD  270 - BIM and Applications (2)

The BIM and Applications course uses Revit to reveal how Building Information Modeling and Integrated Project Delivery work in tandem to produce a highly collaborative design process. As students gain an understanding of how design problems are solved using this approach, they also acquire a powerful visualization and design development tool which can be used in other studios and portfolio refinement.

ARCD  290 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

One-time offerings of special interest courses in architecture and community design.

ARCD  290 - Urb Planning - Leon/Travel (0)

ARCD  300 - Computer Aided Design and Drawing 2 (2)

This course will develop an understanding of digital tools and strategies, which engage and expand the design process, with the primary goal of utilizing the computer as a fluid, critical investigative tool. We will examine the impact of digital strategies, methodologies and practices on the work of contemporary architects, with individual research into modes of representation and its impact on tectonic development.

ARCD  310 - Introduction to Construction Materials (4)

An understanding of the basic properties of major construction materials is fundamental to becoming an effective architect or engineer. This course will introduce students to the properties, applications and design considerations of common construction materials. The course will be a lecture format supplemented by readings, field trips, laboratory experiments, exams and individual research projects. While designed primarily for students of Architecture, the course is also a rigorous introduction to civil engineering materials.

ARCD  312 - Environ Control Systems (2 - 4)

This lecture course introduces students to energy and environmental issues as they relate to the built environment and the materials used to construct buildings. An overview of the basic principles of energy flow and energy use will be provided, as well as the fundamental climatic patterns and variables that have significant impact on building performance and occupant comfort. Passive building designs will be covered for each of the major global climate zones and students will be exposed to the underlying complexity of developing architectural solutions that address a wide range of local and global environmental concerns. Students will study the cultural and technological factors that have driven advances in efficiency and reduced environmental impact. The applicability of passive architecture, especially vernacular forms, as a means of furthering social justice and energy independence of occupants, will be emphasized in the course.

ARCD  312 - Environ Control Sys Lab (0)

ARCD  320 - (4)

This course will provide an interdisciplinary overview of Sustainable Design by presenting a historical and contemporary overview of ecological living practices through lecture, readings, guest speakers, and field trips. Topics include: Bioregion assessments, Sustainable communities, Environmental and Social justice, Permaculture, Native Science, Biomimicry, Urban Gardens and Food Security, Ecoliteracy and Primary Education, Global Economies, Environmental Preservation and Restoration vs. Development, The Global Environment, Impact of Developed Countries consumptive patterns, City Planning, and Green Business and Manufacturing.

ARCD  325 - Introduction to Landscape Architecture (2)

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. A thorough introduction to Landscape Architecture as the discipline of designing and mediating between natural and built environments, and utilizing knowledge from arts and sciences to create quality outdoor community spaces. Lectures supplemented by field trips and small studio projects.

ARCD  330 - Design in Crossroads International (4)

This course sends students overseas for a semester to apply their skills of analysis, interpretation and design in a new cultural setting with its backdrop of social, political and environmental issues. Models for design that the students have honed over the course of the previous three studios will be adjusted and evolve in the face of the particularities and demands of another place, people and history. Student designers will be asked to propose alternative building strategies that could respond to and generate new patterns of living.

ARCD  340 - International Projects (2 - 4)

International Projects provides students an opportunity to provide design assistance to international underserved communities, while gaining real world experience in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning. The course combines student development of an understanding and appreciation for contextual and cultural needs with the acquisition of professional practice skills.

ARCD  350 - Architecture Studio 5 (4)

This studio will deal with the identity of public buildings and their intersection with the social, cultural and political realities, directions and aspirations of their communities. Through an analysis of context and program, and a critical appreciation of building precedents, students will provide architectural solutions that explore the design of collective space, institutional form, building structure and materiality. Throughout the studio, the emphasis will be on understanding and devising design processes that enable an analytical and rigorous approach to architectural design.

ARCD  360 - Introduction to Structural Engineering (4)

Structural engineering is an essential component of building design. The goal of this course is to familiarize architecture students with structural engineering principles, so that they can incorporate them into their design processes. This will enable them to see structural engineering as an integral part of the process, rather than something separate that occurs after the "design work" is done. From their unique perspective as architecture students, students will find ways to question and challenge structural engineering principles that an engineering student may not. Students will become familiar with the many concepts and considerations needed in order to be a better designer, architect, planner, engineer, or related professional.

ARCD  370 - Construction Innovation Lab (2 - 4)

Construction Innovation Lab pairs student teams with real world design/build projects in local and international underserved communities, where innovation in technology and building systems is required to best serve the needs of the partnering community. The course combines student acquisition of cultural competency with professional practice.

ARCD  372 - Engineering, Design and Testing (2 - 4)

This course is designed as a companion to Construction Innovation Lab (ARCD 370), providing students with the tools to technically analyze and perform materials research for their innovative design solutions. Student projects will focus on local and international underserved communities, where innovation in technology and building systems is required to best serve the needs of the partnering community. Students will be expected to utilize knowledge gained in introductory engineering courses to establish parameters and quantitatively summarize material and structural behaviors.

ARCD  390 - Special Topics (0 - 4)

One-time offerings of special interest courses in architecture and community design.

ARCD  398 - Directed Study/Research (1 - 4)

ARCD  400 - Community Design Outreach (SL) (4)

Student involvement in real architecture design/build projects for non-profits, schools, and municipalities in the Bay Area and internationally. In this studio class students take on a larger urban or rural design problem. Through extensive fieldwork, students obtain the requisite understanding of the role of community design in underserved communities and the larger urban forces involved. The projects may be local, national, or international and are intended to lead to student participation and leadership in a community building process.

ARCD  401 - Intro Arch Theory and Writn Word (4)

We regularly engage with the physicality of architecture, that is, the buildings and places that enable, envelop, and mark our daily lives. Yet architecture also exists in the written word, captured in texts that theorize from diverse perspectives the process and significance of architectural conception and realization. Through extensive readings and student-led discussions, this course will carefully examine theories and perspectives as depicted in representative texts from antiquity to the present.

ARCD  410 - Portfolio Lab (2)

The discipline of architecture is as centered on its discourse-writing and verbalizing-as it is on building production. Through this course students will investigate the various approaches to writing about their work and establish a distinct focus of future professional inquiry. The class will examine how other architects have presented their work through publication and look at how the architectural press covers the work of architects. Students will then delve into their own projects to create a snapshot of their work projected in the form of a portfolio.

ARCD  420 - Pract/Internship: Constr Mgmt (2)

Student internships with architecture firms, non-profit low-income housing developers, municipal planning or building departments, and social and environmental justice oriented organizations. Through the practicum and internship process, students will obtain the experience of working with a range of populations with varying needs, the meaning of professionalism, and the place of community design in the larger context of urban design.

ARCD  430 - Prof. Practice/Internship (4)

A career in architecture is a series of choices about the complex relationship amongst architecture, society, and the environment. Students will reflect on these choices in the context of professional practice, as well as their own interests, skills, and opportunities.

ART  100 - Art Appreciation (4)

The course provides an understanding of the methods of identifying, interpreting, and evaluating ideas in the creative arts. Areas covered include art's functions, the visual elements and principles of design, the styles of art, and the art object. Offered every semester.

ART  101 - Survey of Western Art History 1 (4)

Survey of Western Art History 1 introduces students chronologically to major themes, movements, and issues in Western Art History from prehistoric times through the Rococco (approximately 1750). This course is ordinarily restricted to Visual Arts and Architecture/Community Design Majors, although other students may be admitted on a space-availalbe basis with permission of the instructor.

ART  102 - Survey of Western Art History II (4)

Survey of Western Art History 2 studies the complex relationships between artists and the cultures in which they work, from 1750 to the present, exploring how art deals with questions of war and peace, social justice, religious belief, censorship, propaganda, gender, ethnic and social identity, and social critique.

ART  103 - Drawing for Non-Majors (4)

In this course, students will cultivate observational skills and learn to use drawing tools, such as pencils, charcoal and ink to create drawings on a variety of traditional 2-dimensional surfaces. Technical aspects of the course will cover composition, shape, contrast, texture and gesture as they relate to the history of the medium. Field trips to museums and other resources will supplement readings and studio based assignments.

ART  104 - Art + Architecture Fabrication Lab (0 - 1)

Art + Architecture Fabrication Lab, a required course for students majoring in Architecture, Fine Arts and Design, offers students supervised professional construction and safety training using the Fabrication tools and equipment. Students complete a variety of practical construction-based projects to develop and practice proper material and tool use. The conceptual, theoretical and practical instruction received in this course will prepare students for studio based course work and provide future access to the tools and labs in the Department of Art + Architecture.

ART  105 - The Imaginary Museum (4)

The Imaginary Museum presents the great formal and historical issues of art history in western and world art traditions, with emphasis on the styles of objective accuracy, formal order, emotion, and fantasy.

ART  106 - Painting for Non-Majors (4)

Painting for Non-Majors is the exploration of painting space and illusion through light and color as related through acrylic painting. The examination of traditional and experimental methods of painting will be explored with regards to image making. The acquisition of technique and style within painting will provide students the foundation for discovering their unique self-expression.

ART  120 - Art Fundamentals (4)

This core studio class introduces the student to the broad range of materials, methodologies, and strategies that compose the art and design program. The student will explore a series of studio problems that begin simple and move to greater complexity. The language of art and design point, line, plane, space, color, light, value, texture, proportion, and scale will be the framework of our 2D and 3D investigations. (Required for all BAVA majors)

ART  130 - Drawing 1 (4)

This basic drawing class introduces the student to the notion of mark-making. We will look at the way representations are made, their structure in space, and their context. A range of materials from dry (i.e. charcoals, chalks, pencils) to wet (inks) and various surfaces will be studied.

ART  155 - Visual Communication I (4)

The Visual Communication course series will introduce students to the technical and conceptual study of graphic design as a wide-ranging practice for the creation, reproduction, and dissemination of visual messages. In Visual Communication I, students will explore these issues while developing fluency in the Macintosh OS operating system Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and In Design.

ART  175 - Visual Communication II (4)

The Visual Communication course series will introduce students to the technical and conceptual study of graphic design as a wide-ranging practice for the creation, reproduction, and dissemination of visual messages. In Visual Communication II, students will explore these issues while developing fluency in web development using HTML, CSS, Dreamweaver and Flash.

ART  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ART  200 - Museum Studies 1 (4)

Introduction to Museum Studies presents the historical development of museums, their collection, exhibition and education functions, administration, physical facilities, fundraising and ethics. Particular attention will be given to issues of diversity and multiculturalism; relationship of museums to changing populations and disciplinary trends; and examination of diverse types of collections. USF's Thacher Gallery serves as the laboratory for this course.

ART  205 - Typography (4)

This course will introduce students to the practice, history, and theory of typography. Through design research, independent project work, and collaborative exercises, students will produce typographic solutions to applied and experimental problems using typography as their primary, if not exclusive, design element.

ART  215 - Arts for Educators (4)

Arts for Educators is an interdisciplinary course for future elementary classroom teachers and students desiring an overview of the visual and performing arts. This course will offer students critical perspectives on arts education and hands-on experience in music, theater, dance/movement and visual art, with the goal of preparing them for reflective, culturally inclusive integration of the arts into the academic curriculum. The guiding framework for students’ examination of arts education theory and practice originates from the California Visual and Performing Arts (CA VAPA) Content Standards and the professor’s experience in the education and arts disciplines. The CA VAPA Standards include: 1) artistic perception, 2) creative expression, 3) understanding the cultural and historical origins of the arts, 4) pursuing meaning in the arts, and 5) making informed judgments about the arts. The course will culminate in student presentations of integrated arts units.

ART  220 - Painting 1 (4)

This introductory class will provide students with experience in acrylic, gouache, and watercolor as means for the exploration into the visual language of color, light, shape, and mass as they are embodied in paint. Painting support and the preparation of various surfaces will be studied.

ART  225 - The Museum, Society and Culture (4)

This course explores the role museums (especially history and natural history museums) play in society and the range of issues they face in conserving and presenting cultural and historical materials to the public. Topics include the politics of representation, collecting practices, intellectual property rights and repatriation, displaying culture, and working with diverse publics. Will include visits to area museums.

ART  230 - Sculpture 1 (4)

This course develops the student's creative and technical skills in sculpture. Specific problems are given to explore and utilize the elements of form, space, line and mass. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and the physical means of realizing an idea three-dimensionally. Various media and techniques are explored, and students are encouraged to develop their own unique styles and visual language.

ART  241 - Art of the Book (4)

This course will expose students to the history and development of the book as an art form unto itself, from text to illustration to fine art, while teaching them a variety of techniques and materials with which to make their own books.

ART  245 - Visual Theology (4)

Visual Theology explores humanity's experience of the transcendent and sacred by learning to "read" the visual texts of religious myth, symbol, iconography and architecture from the Western and other traditions. Lecture course combines slide shows, reading and discussions, fieldtrips and creative projects.

ART  252 - Publication Design (4)

This course utilizes the concepts and skills introduced in previous graphic design courses and builds upon these skills to further expand the palette and vocabulary of design. Students will develop a stronger understanding of typography and the integration of information into a publication format. Projects expand in complexity and focus on the challenges of design publication.

ART  270 - Ceramics 1 (4)

Ceramics 1 presents a working knowledge of the world's ceramic tradition from a functional, sculptural, and historical point of view. The goal of the class is for each student to develop basic hand building and sculptural techniques for the production of fine art and craft ceramics. These goals will be achieved through the creation of projects that utilize the construction methods of pinch, slab, coil, and combined techniques.

ART  280 - Digital Photography 1 (4)

This course is designed to develop your skills in pixel based photographic manipulation and printing. The class will use Adobe Photoshop as the primary image-editing tool. Students will attend presentations, exhibitions and group critiques, and create a portfolio of digital photographic work.

ART  290 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

ART  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ART  298 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Directed study of a subject in the visual arts. The written permission of the instructor and the dean is required. Offered every semester.

ART  300 - Museum Studies 2 (4)

Principles of collection development, management, conservation and use are taught in a special semester-long course using collections of Bay Area Museums.

ART  301 - Design + Social Change Seminar (4)

This course will demonstrate to students the power of design to leverage their sense of humanity and ability to fashion a more humane and just world. The course will survey an array of visual styles, communications and design projects that date from the turn of the century to the present in the form of artistic posters, non-commercial advertisements, web sites, outreach and political propaganda.

ART  302 - Renaissance Art (4)

This upper-division seminar explores issues and moments in European art and visual culture, circa 1400-1600, with an emphasis on the early modern visual traditions in Italy and the Lowlands. Weekly class meetings focus on individual topics such as: Humanist Art and Republican Values in Early Renaissance Florence, the Medici and the Age of Lorenzo the Magnificent, Botticelli as Visual Poet, Leonardo da Vinci: Drawing and Visual Knowledge, Papal Power and Visual Propaganda in Early 16th-Century Rome, Michelangelo and the Robust Male Nude, Gender, Virtue(s) and Social Status in Renaissance Portraiture and Courtly Art in the Burgundian Netherlands.

ART  303 - Baroque Art:Rome to Versailles (4)

This upper-division seminar examines topics in Baroque painting, sculpture and architecture, with special attention to the varied visual, cultural and religious traditions that flourished in and around some of the major urban areas of 17th-century Europe, including Rome, Antwerp, Amsterdam and Paris. Focusing on the works of Caravaggio, the Carracci, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer and Poussin, the course trains a special eye on issues such as the rise of the famed, international artist in the 17th-century, church and court patronage in the post-Tridentine period, the impact of the devastating Thirty Years’ War and the expansion of global exploration and trade on European artistic practice, and shifting conceptions of painting in the new Dutch Republic and the French court of Louis XIV.

ART  304 - Sustainable Systems Design Seminar (4)

Sustainable Design Seminar will examine theories and practices that encourage the development of ecological consciousness as applied to design practice and production. This course will ask students to think critically about what sustainability actually means, and to examine the complexities in our choices of materials, processes, locations, quantities, production and consumption.

ART  305 - Modern and Contemporary Art (4)

This upper-division seminar takes into account new approaches to the study of visual culture—including painting, sculpture, photography, performance, video, architecture—from 1945 to the present. Through thematic and monographic case studies, students investigate questions about artistic identity, the status and function of art in the post-World War II period, and the changing nature of avant-garde practices in the wake of the social, cultural, and economic changes of the 1960s and 1970s. Moving along a clear timeline, the course looks at key movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptualism, Feminist Art, Postmodernism, performance and video art to explore the political, theoretical and issue-based debates that have inspired the art and criticism since 1945. Throughout the course, students examine the political and social context for contemporary art practice and criticism, including the civil rights movement, feminism, environmentalism, the anti-war movement, postmodernism and globalization.

ART  306 - Women and Art (4)

This course examines the history of female artists from the Middle Ages to the present, with an emphasis on artists working in Europe and the United States for the first half of the course, and a global perspective on modern and contemporary art for the second. Students explore how the identity of the “woman artist” has been socially constructed over time, with particular emphasis upon how gender and sexual-identity, social class, race, and ethnicity have informed both artistic creation and reception. The course addresses how art history and institutions (educational and exhibition forums) have accounted for—or failed to account for—women's artistic production in a global context.

ART  307 - Asian Art (CD) (4)

This lecture course examines periods and monuments of Asian art from India, China, and Japan, and offers an introduction to the methods of art-historical analysis. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of works of art in their original religious, intellectual, political, and social contexts, with particular attention to the ways each developed characteristics appropriate to these contexts. Among the topics to be explored are ritual arts, Buddhist art (painting, sculpture, and architecture), secular painting, and garden architecture.

ART  308 - African Art (CD) (4)

This introductory class helps students gain knowledge and appreciation of the plastic and kinetic arts of sub-Saharan Africa. Mythology, masking traditions, ritual and spirituality, gender and cultural issues of traditional and contemporary African cultures are examined through slide lectures, videos, and museum visits.

ART  309 - Art of the Americas (4)

This course surveys the arts of the Americas from pre-Columbian North and South America through the present. The course emphasizes the native arts of the Americas in the broadest sense by examining the work of native cultures, immigrant cultures with special attention to Latino art.

ART  310 - Drawing 2 (4)

This course investigates at a more advanced level the complex representation of space on the two dimensional drawing plane. The focus is on issues such as figure and still life as well as personal and conceptual questions in aesthetics and in the larger culture. The student will work in a range of scales and with a range of drawing materials.

ART  311 - Medieval Art and Society (4)

Contemporary thinking about the art of the Middle Ages is often dominated by a long-standing prejudice and propensity to see it as somehow "backward," “simplistic,” or lacking in intrinsic interest or value. However, a wealth of art historical scholarship over the past few decades has begun to recapture the ways a vast array of medieval art and architecture reflects the unique cultural and intellectual concerns, compelling religious, economic and political circumstances, and complex social challenges of a lengthy and fascinating stretch of European history. This seminar highlights significant “moments” and monuments of the long Middle Ages, with an eye to underscoring some of the incredible richness and sophistication of medieval artistic production from the beginnings of Christian art through the late Gothic period.

ART  314 - History of Design (4)

This course will present a historical study of the material world, focusing on designed objects. It will challenge students to think critically about the rhetoric of design and examine the ways in which objects are both reflective of the culture that produced them while also serving as devices for cultural change. The course will examine design in an interdisciplinary sense, looking at case studies in industrial design, decorative arts, graphic design, fashion, and architecture in order to equip students with an understanding of the ways in which design practices, technologies, and cultural meaning have changed through time.

ART  315 - Digital Literacy (4)

Digital Literacy will introduce students to the practice and history of screen-based interactive design and web publishing using Dreamweaver, Flash, and introductory program languages. Course work will cover topics of interaction design, networked culture, and critical analysis of the use of technology in design and our everyday lives.

ART  316 - Filipino American Arts (CD) (4)

This combined studio and cultural history course offers a survey of Filipino American artistic production,looking at visual art, literature, music, and performance. The goal of the course is for students to develop their own artistic voice in response to histories of colonization, transnationalism, and globalization.

ART  320 - Painting 2 (4)

This intermediate studio class will build upon previous experience gained from Painting 1. The course will provide students with the introduction to personal subject matter while still providing expertise with technical issues in acryllic painting. Personal expression will be emphasized within the context of painting's history and contemporary issues with society and culture.

ART  325 - Color Theory (4)

COLOR THEORY is an intermediate course for students in the four majors of the Department of Art + Architecture. This class is designed to meet the needs of students to prepare them for aesthetic and theoretical color use in their respective disciplines. Each student will attend presentations, workshops and group critiques, and create a portfolio of studio work individually and collaboratively.

ART  330 - Sculpture 2 (4)

This course builds upon the student's creative and technical skills developed in Introduction to Sculpture. As a continuing exploration of the physical means of realizing an idea three-dimensionally, students make molds of their own original clay sculptures and then cast them in a variety of media. Emphasis is placed on quality and craftsmanship, while students are encouraged to develop their own unique styles and visual language.

ART  335 - Information Visualization (4)

This course will introduce students to the study of information visualization as a wide-ranging practice for the creation of complex visual messages. Through sustained project work, students will investigate the ways that illustration, text, photography, sound, and the moving image can, in different ways, participate in the process of communicating multi-faceted and multi-dimensional systems of information. Lectures, readings, and student research will supplement project work, introducing students to the concentrated disciplines of mapping, timelines, and the history of information representation.

ART  345 - Exhibition Design Practicum (4)

Exhibition Design Practicum will provide students working experience with the professional practice of exhibition design. Through research and collaborative project work, students will curate, design, and mount an exhibition for the university's Thacher Gallery.

ART  350 - Advanced Typography (4)

Advanced typographic systems is an upper-level graphic design course that focuses on issues concerning typography and strategies for working with large amounts of text in the profession of graphic design.

ART  351 - Stained Glass 2 (4)

Stained Glass 2 builds on skills developed in the introductory class. Course includes flat glass painting, kiln work, fusing, slumping, and glass casting techniques.

ART  355 - Design Internship (4)

This internship offers students an opportunity to work on self-directed study projects with external and/or internal non-profit clients. Students are encouraged to locate internship-type opportunities to engage in client-based work and gain direct, full-immersion experience working with selected design professionals in their studios and businesses.

ART  360 - Mural Painting (4)

This is a studio course in mural painting that will contextualize the studio activities within the history and theories of mural painting and art activism. The field of cultural studies will be used to raise issues and questions fundamental to creating collaborative, public and activist art.

ART  363 - The Triumph of Impressionism (4)

This course is an introduction to the most famous artistic movement in the history of art and one of the most important: Impressionism. It analyzes how a group of passionate young men and women struggled for years to offer their own vision of art and planted the seeds of many 20th century art movements.

ART  370 - Installation/Public Art (4)

This course investigates a visual art making through a multi-disciplinary approach. Students will utilize the potential of landscape, environmental, social and aesthetic phenomena for initiating group and/or individual actions. Students will experience the full public art process (collaboration with communities/local agencies, preliminary presentation, permitting process, fundraising, publicity, and preparation and implementation of an installation piece).

ART  375 - Printmaking 1 (4)

This intermediate level course introduces students to traditional printmaking practices. Wood relief and copper intaglio methods will be used to create original multiples of art. Environmentally sensitive chemicals and safe processes will be used.

ART  380 - Stained Glass 1 (4)

This course introduces students to the history of stained and leaded glass design and technique through background and slide lectures and site visits to Bay Area churches and installations ("Glass Traditions"). The bulk of the class is in studio format in which the students learn to design and construct stained glass panels.

ART  385 - Interaction Design (4)

Interaction Design will advance students’ technical and conceptual skills in interaction design within the digital environment. Coursework emphasizes immersive and engaging user experience, site optimization, data visualization, and networked databases, along with readings that examine the history of human-machine interaction.

ART  390 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

One-time offerings of special interest courses in art history.

ART  398 - Directed Study/Research (1 - 4)

Directed study of a subject. The written permission of the instructor and the dean is required. Offered every semester.

ART  405 - Drawing 3 (4)

In this course, students of Drawing will build upon their general knowledge of the field of study while making an in-depth investigation of this particular focus.

ART  415 - Painting 3 (4)

In this course, students of Painting will build upon their general knowledge of the field of study while making an in-depth investigation of this particular focus.

ART  420 - Art and Business/Prof. Practice (4)

Students learn the practical "nuts and bolts" business aspects of the art world through museum and gallery visits, curating of exhibitions,and presentations on finance, insurance, portfolio building, and grant writing from art professionals.

ART  421 - Internship/Fine Arts Museum (1 - 4)

This internship places students in a museum setting where they learn the skills of community outreach, educational programming, fund raising, curating of exhibitions, among other skills. Partner organizations include: the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (De Young Museum and Legion of Honor), the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), the Contemporary Jewish Museum, the Exploratorium, the Museum of Craft and Design, among others.

ART  422 - Internship/Commercial Gallery (1 - 4)

This internship serves as an opportunity for students to develop patterns of professional behavior in the commercial art world setting. Students will be placed in a Bay Area art gallery where they will learn skills such as client interaction, cataloguing of works of art, shipping and insuring art, sales techniques, curating exhibitions, planning receptions, art fairs, and other public events, etc. Partner art galleries in San Francisco include: Franklin Bowles, Braunstein/Quay, Catharine Clark, Christopher Clark, Frey Norris, Haines Gallery, Hespe Gallery, Robert Koch, and Toomey Tourrell Fine Art.

ART  423 - Internship/Arts Non-Profit (SL) (1 - 4)

This internship places students in a non-profit arts organization where they learn the skills of community outreach, fund raising, and curating of exhibitions in an alternative arts setting. Partner organizations include: Creativity Explored, Intersection for the Arts, Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts, New Langton Arts, and the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery.

ART  425 - Sculpture 3 (4)

In this studio/practicum course students will learn how sculptors working in such areas as the film industry and medical and forensic science apply their art in creative and innovative ways.

ART  450 - Design Internship (4)

Design Internship provides students a supervised work experience within a professional Bay Area design setting that complements the theoretical, methodological and practical instruction received in the Design major. Additional course work will contextualize the students’ work experience and will helps them to prepare for future work within the field.

ART  460 - Senior Design Project (4)

This course prepares students for exploring employment, internship and graduate educational opportunities. Concepts, cross platform developments and issues concerning aesthetics, interface design and use of media are addressed. Students investigate specific areas of the graphic design industry and prepare applications and portfolios geared towards their area of interest. Students collect relevant material and produce a CD/DVD/Web-based portfolio, packaging for CD/DVD, resume, cover letter, business card, and a flatbook portfolio. Corequisite concurrent lab.

ART  460 - Senior Design Project Lab (0)

Corequisite: ART 460 Senior Design Project studio.

ART  465 - Fine Art Internship (1 - 4)

The course Fine Arts Internship offers students supervised pre-professional internship experiences designed to complement the conceptual, theoretical and practical instruction received in the Fine Arts major in the Department of Art + Architecture.

ART  470 - Senior Studio (4)

Senior Studio is a capstone course in the Fine Arts major in the department of Visual Arts that is designed to meet the professional needs of students whose concentration is studio art. The goal of the course is to prepare students for lives as working visual artists. Each student will complete a studio internship with a professional artist, attend presentations, workshops and group critiques, and create a solo senior exhibition and accompanying slide or CD portfolio.

ART  475 - Printmaking 2 (4)

This advanced level course introduces students to contemporary methods and processes, building upon experiences from the prerequisite course: ART 375 - Printmaking 1. Solar intaglio, lithography and linocut methods will be used to create original multiples of art. Environmentally sensitive chemicals and safe processes will be used.

ART  480 - Professional Practice in Design (4)

Professional Practice in Design will bring students greater awareness of the career options that will be available to them following graduation and will provide them with the skills that will enable them to successfully enter the profession.

ART  487 - Art OR: Artist as Citizen (CD) (4)

First part of a year-long sequence. Artist as Citizen A is primarily conceptual and theoretical. The class is composed of lectures/discussions with guests from various communities, readings, slides, journal keeping and a full scale proposal for a community-based art project.

ART  488 - Art OR: Artist as Citizen (SL) (4)

Artist as Citizen B, Artist in the Community, is the outreach portion of the year-long sequence, (the "street" component). This includes work on site, collaborations, designing visual narratives and survival strategies that focus on marginalized communities. Possible communities could be those concerned with environmental issues, health, homelessness, teens at risk, racism, educational institutions, among others.

ARUP  300 - Latino Gangs in Oakland and SF (SL) (4)

Engages USF students in local, marginalized community issues.

ARUP  301 - Women, Poverty, and Catholic Social Thought (SL) (4)

This course highlights intersections between gender, poverty, and Catholic social thought. As an Arrupe Justice Immersion course, the class combines classroom instruction with local immersion, required service, and reflection. No prerequisites.

ARUP  302 - Injustice, Healing and The Blues (SL) (4)

To analyze the dynamics of the social, economic and political marginalization that gave birth to Blues and to examine how marginalized groups overcome injustice through cultural engagement.

ARUP  303 - Zambia Today (SL) (4)

Explore the strength of a community working together (Ubuntu) to get beyond the AIDS impasse.

ARUP  304 - Public Health and Homelessness (SL) (4)

The objectives of this immersion and service learning course are to understand, witness, and reflect upon the state of health care among the poor and marginalized of the City, with a focus on the experience of the individual person with respect to discrimination, addiction, violence, access to health care, health education, and physical and mental health problems stemming from poverty (and vice versa). These issues will be addressed in the context of a historical perspective of urban poverty. The service component of the course includes outreach, exploration, and volunteering at a range of health and housing service sites in San Francisco.

ARUP  305 - Ignatian Education Seminar in Peru (4)

The Ignatian Education Seminar is designed for students interested in studying the Jesuit commitment for social justice in Lima, Peru. This class explores the pressing social issues to the most marginalized, learns from the people working on the frontlines, and connects with local students leaders working for justice.

ARUP  306 - Students in Arts and Incarceration (SL) (4)

The Arts and Incarceration is designed for students who are interested in merging social activism, performance and teaching. Students will learn how to use the arts (theater/movement/ music/writing) to address critical social and cultural issues by creating a dialogue between incarcerated people and their communities. Through discussion, hands on exercises, readings and video, students will gain skills in, and a context for, a creative pedagological activist process that is rooted in community-based arts.

ARUP  307 - Culture, the Environment and Tourism: Sitka, Alaska (SL) (4)

This 17-day, 4-credit Arrupe Social Justice Immersion course in anthropology (ANTH 280) and environmental studies (ENVA 280) examines the relationship between culture and the environment in the unique island setting of Sitka, Alaska. You will not only learn about the area’s terrestrial and marine environments and how Tlingit and non-Native residents of Sitka use its natural resources, but also about local controversies surrounding the stewardship of the region’s natural resources – its fish and other marine life, timber, and scenic beauty. The latter includes considering the social and environmental impact of different forms of tourism.

ARUP  308 - English Minga in the Ecuadorian Amazon (3)

This graduate course is designed to become immersed in Achuar way of living and to work with Achuar teachers to develop an Achuar-centric English language curriculum, helping them attain their goal of self-sufficiency.

ARUP  309 - Minds in Motion: Movement as a Tool for Curriculum (4)

The USF Dance Program works with children at Colegio Miguel Pro in Tacna, Peru, with a focus on teaching academic curriculum through movement. Working closely with classroom teachers, the USF team creates a series of movement classes for 1st to 6th grades, addressing the curriculum units that each class is studying. Class material ranges from multiplication to geometry, history to poetry, body systems to earth habitats. In addition, after-school rehearsals are held daily to prepare for an end of session performance. This performance provides a culminating experience and an opportunity to celebrate the creative contribution and personal growth of everyone involved. The Minds in Motion course in Tacna, Peru, emphasizes that movement and creativity can be powerful tools in deconstructing economic and cultural barriers, creating new levels of understanding amongst people of different backgrounds and cultures.

ARUP  310 - Latina Activism: Gender and Immigration in San Francisco (4)

The course will study the roots and present day context of Latina immigration in San Francisco and the US. This will be accomplished by examining the history of immigration withing the framework of community activism, cultural citizenship and the plight of Spanish-speaking women immigrants in this city. We will workshop with artists and activists, as well as do service work with two organizations who support women immigrants. Our final goal will be to strategize a tool for social action based on the collaboration with and specific needs of this community.

ARUP  311 - Border Issues Seminar in Tijuana (4)

This is a bi-national course that combines academic experiences with community based learning in the Jesuit tradition among Latino immigrants to the US. The course includes college students from Mexico and from US Jesuit universities. (In cooperation with Universidad Iberamericana Tijuana)

ARUP  312 - Alliances w/Newcomer Youth-ESL (4)

The objective of this course is to align USF students with newcomer and immigrant youth enrolled in the San Francisco Unified School District. Partnering with the Telegraph Hill Neighborhood Center (Tel-Hi), this course will introduce students to the history of youth mentorship and leadership initiatives for immigrant youth in San Francisco, as well as pedagogical approaches towards being an effective mentor. Students will develop relationships with youth as well as Tel-Hi professionals to enhance their understandings of social justice and community service.

ARUP  313 - Central Valley Immersion (4)

The Central Valley Immersion is designed for students interested in learning from grassroots leaders in Bakersfield, Fresno, Modesto, Delano, and Merced working with the Latino and Mohng communities. This class explores the pressing social issues connected to migration, and the innovation and leadership skills that have merged from the community based organizations for social transformation.

ARUP  314 - Bynd Borders: Israel-Palestine (4)

BBIP is designed for students interested in social justice activism and international conflict. Students will intern with a Jerusalem-based NGO working to support marginalized communities in Israel and Palestine, in addition to analyzing and reflecting upon root causes of societal forms of oppression. This course aims to de-exceptionalize this ostensibly exceptional conflict, empowering students to understand and embrace ways to transform the opporessive patterns present in Israel, Palestine, and beyond.

ARUP  315 - Peru Arrupe Immersion (0)

ARUP  316 - Colombia Arrupe Immersion (0)

ARUP  317 - El Salvador Arrupe Immersion (0)

ARUP  318 - Appalachia Arrupe Immersion (0)

ARUP  319 - Mexico Arrupe Immersion (0)

ARUP  320 - Cuba Immersion: Health Care (2)

This 2 unit elective includes lessons in Spanish and Medical Spanish, visits to clinics and community health centers, and cultural events in Havana Cuba. Come learn about local health conditions as well as how Cuba has developed an impressive public health system making great advances despite economic hardships. Please contact professor to find out about the program cost.

ARUP  321 - Health Care in Central Valley (2)

This Central Valley Immersion is a 2 credits course open to nurses and Public Health students that during 2 weeks would travel to some of the cities in the Central Valley, become immersed in the lives of migrants, visit public health sites and programs sponsored by Save the Children. Please contact professor to find out about the program cost.

ARUP  322 - China Today (4)

This cultural diversity immersion class explores Beijing – the heart and soul of China – to understand its current influence in the world. We experience China’s complex culture, economy, politics, business, and society. Please contact professor to find out about the program cost.

ARUP  323 - Urban Marginality In Paris (2)

This course explores urban marginality in Paris, France and its suburbs (Banlieues). We examine a variety of topics, from French colonial History to current immigration trend(s), ethnic statistics policy and unemployment in order to frame a larger discussion on diversity, poverty and exclusion in France. Through participation in social activities with underprivileged youth and discussions with social workers, students explore social and cultural inequalities affecting disintegrated communities and efforts to change the status quo from within. Concurrent exploration of French culture (museums, etc.), business etiquette, and survival French will allow for cultural comparisons in such a way as to broaden a reflection on diversity and treatment of minorities, two key elements of an European identity still in the making. Please contact professor to find out about the program cost.

ARUP  324 - Cuba: Sustainable Agriculture (4)

This Arrupe Justice Immersion explores sustainable agriculture in Cuba. With extended stays in Havana and Pinar del Rio, this program introduces students to Cuba’s agricultural history and current realities and immerses them into the country’s policies and practices in sustainable and urban agriculture, community-based food production, and responsible economic development. Through readings, meetings, site visits, speaker presentations, discussions, workdays, meals, and individual and group reflections, students will explore these vital issues and benefit from numerous opportunities to learn from and interact with key policy makers, community leaders, and practitioners of permaculture and sustainable agriculture.

ARUP  325 - Dominican Rep Arrupe Immersion (0)

ARUP  326 - Explrng Buddhst Himlayas India (4)

This 3-week study abroad course with 12-hour pre-departure class meetings will explore the history, culture, and religion of Tibetan refugees in Dharamsala, India through reading materials, reciprocal service-learning opportunities at monastic and non-monastic institutions, lectures by local specialists and activists, conversations with Buddhist monastics and hermits about their beliefs and practices, observing cultural and religious festivities, and visiting sacred and historical sites. Through these learning resources, students will learn how Tibetan Buddhist culture continues to shape the lives of this largely immigrant community, and how individuals in turn give new meanings to their religion and culture in an era of globalization.

ARUP  327 - Philippines Today (4)

This is an intensive service learning and cultural diversity justice immersion class on the Philippines. During Philippines Today, you will experience the Philippines’ rich and complex environment, culture, economy, politics, and society firsthand. An overriding theme for the service learning immersion is the Philippines rural and urban environment, particularly in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, and the social justice work that still needs to be done.

ASL  101 - American Sign Language 1 (4)

Prerequisite: None. Not open to native signers. Study of the fundamentals of American Sign Language. Preparation for visual/gestural communication including basic information relating to Deaf culture, intensive work on comprehension skills and grammatical structures. Novice to Beginner proficiency. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

ASL  102 - American Sign Language 2 (4)

Prerequisite: Completion of ASL 101 or equivalent. Not open to native signers. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of American Sign Language: Comprehension skills, grammatical structures, practice in the production aspects of the language, and exposure to Deaf culture. Upper beginner to moderate proficiency. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

ASL  201 - American Sign Language 3 (4)

Prerequisite: Completion of ASL 102 or equivalent. Not open to native signers. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of American Sign Language: Comprehension skills, grammatical structures, practice in the production aspects of the language, and exposure to Deaf culture. Moderate to lower advanced proficiency.

ASL  290 - Special Topics in ASL (4)

ASL  390 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

ASL  398 - Dir Reading and Research (1 - 6)

ASP  110 - Foreword: Math (.5)

ASP  111 - Foreword: Writing (.5)

ASP  112 - Foreword: Comtemporary Issues (.5)

ASP  113 - Foreword: Computer Literacy (.5)

BAIS  101 - The World Since 1945 (4)

An interpretive political history of the world since 1945, focusing on major actors, events, and international affairs, both Western and non-Western. Offered intermittently.

BAIS  102 - Intro to Int'l Politics (4)

A course which situates and compares the political institutions, cultures, and processes of states in a variety of world regions. Special attention is paid to the comparison of non-Western regions, including Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Offered every semester.

BAIS  103 - The Global Economy (4)

This course offers an introduction to the world economy, international trade, and economic development, designed especially for non-economics majors. Foundations of international markets and trade, comparative advantage, foreign investment, international inequality, and the study of international institutions such as the IMF, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization will form key components of the class.

BAIS  201 - Research Methods (4)

Quantitative and qualitative research skills with applications to international topics. Applied statistical reasoning; establishing causal relationships; introductory regression analysis; experimental methods; interviewing, focus group, and case study techniques; archival and oral history methods; and data sources for international research projects. Prerequisite: MATH 101

BAIS  305 - Global Network: Consump and Ecol (4)

This course examines consumption and ecology while aiming to promote sustainability and peace but it makes global dialogue possible through technology. The class is taught on campuses around the world and students discuss issues and prepare presentations with students from other countries as well as meeting for discussions on campus.

BAIS  310 - Global Environmental Politics (4)

In Global Environmental Politics we consider the international law and institutions which make up the international environmental regime. We will examine global action on such issues as climate change, species extinction, and pollution, while also considering the relationship between policy made at the global level and environmental action at the local level. These classroom topics are enhanced by a service learning project with a local environmental organization.

BAIS  320 - Human Rights (4)

In Human Rights we consider the international law and institutions which make up the international human rights regime. We examine the development of international human rights from the end of World War II to the present day, and explore issues such as how to define international human rights, who decides when rights have been violated, and how best to address such violations. While focusing on international human rights law, in this course we also consider how international conceptions of human rights are internalized at the domestic level to encourage greater protections through law, policy, and advocacy.

BAIS  325 - Diplomacy (4)

This course will explore the history and practice of global diplomacy. We will concentrate on types of diplomacy, strategies of negotiation, and the ways in which diplomacy can help solve current problems globally. We conclude with mock climate change negotiations during which students will use diplomacy to solve the most pressing issue of our time.

BAIS  370 - European Cultures and Lives (4)

The goal of this course is to provide a cultural history of Europe that will inform students about the historical particularity of this region intended to guide further study of contemporary society and culture. The period roughly from 1750 to the present will be covered. The method that will be employed is to present a historical continuum brought to life through the voices of figures who lived through some of the central transformations of the epoch. The course is divided into sections and each section will include both excerpts from a textbook and various contemporary texts, including autobiographies and essays. The idea beyond this method is to make the historical changes tangible and to understand how a variety of developments in letters, the arts, and the sciences intersected. As a European Studies course, the material presented will allow for the overcoming national self-definitions and is intended to direct students towards a regional understanding of shared history. In effect, national developments were intertwined throughout the period under investigation and the course will underline these commonalities.

BAIS  375 - Colonialism and Empire (4)

The focus of this class is to develop a deep understanding of multiple issues that provide a kaleidoscopic view of the social processes of empire and colonialism. Students will come to understand the key terms and means through which colonial power has been and continues to be transmitted.

BAIS  376 - Postcolonial Migr and Euro Ident (4)

Since World War II, European society has been tremendously affected by migrations, many the result of prior colonial networks. The result has been a newly multicultural European society that has been recently challenged on many fronts. This class will investigate migration, multiculturalism and the rise of anti-immigration sentiment in Europe.

BAIS  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

This course focuses on a special subject in International Studies. Offered intermittently. Course may be repeated for credit as subject varies. Prerequisites may be applied in any given semester at the discretion of the professor offering the course.

BAIS  395 - Int'l Affairs Review (2)

In this course, students will learn to plan, edit, and produce a journal of academic work about International Studies and the world around us. In this two-credit course, you will have the opportunity to find scholarly work to publish, work with authors, edit, layout and finally publish a full-length academic journal. This opportunity is an ideal choice for those looking for publication and editorial experience for their resume.

BAIS  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

BAIS  399 - BAIS Internship (SL) (4)

The purpose of this course is to provide students in International Studies with the opportunity to expand their learning beyond the classroom and into the community. Though many of the topics BAIS students consider take place on faraway shores, there are a host of local non-profit organizations that are engaged in issues such as development economics, ecological justice, human trafficking, and refugees, among other topics. This course fulfills the USF service learning requirement because you will be working in a non-profit environment that provides a service to the community and to the world. However, this experience should also allow students to see how their knowledge gleaned as USF can be put to work in the world at large. The internship will introduce students to active organizations working on international issues and it will allow them to develop patterns of professional behavior as well as providing some connections and useful job experience. As a result of this course, students will gain knowledge of the organizational structures not only of their own community partner, but of others where fellow students are interns. Discussions and reflections during class time will provide an outlet to enrich your own experience and to learn what others are facing in their internships.

BAIS  490 - Capstone Seminar (4)

This course provides students with an opportunity to engage in a focused study of a topic in International Studies, using advanced theoretical readings as well as primary and secondary material to write an original research paper.

BAIS  495 - Honors Thesis Seminar (4)

This course is open to seniors who have a least a 3.5 grade point average and who meet other requirements for admission as established by instructor. Course may be used toward track or region elective in International Studies as agreed with instructor and adviser.

BIOL  99 - MCAT Preparation (2)

This course is designed to assist students in preparing for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), the standardized exam required as part of the admissions process to most US medical schools. The course includes a review of the basic sciences (Biology, Chemistry and Physics), with attention to the three sections of the MCAT: Physical Science, Biological Sciences and Verbal Reasoning. Both content and cognitive skills will be addressed, along with how to be successful in the MCAT testing format. This course does NOT count toward credit for requirements in any major, minor, emphasis or certificate program at USF. Letter grades will not be assigned, the course is Pass/Fail only. Four hours of lecture each week. Prerequisite: Permission of department.

BIOL  100 - The Science of Life (4)

A survey of selected biological concepts, including the chemical basis of life, cell structure, organismal physiology, genetics, evolution, and ecology. This course should provide the non-biologist with a working knowledge of life science that will be useful in making informed decisions on health and the environment. Two lectures and one laboratory weekly. Offered Fall and Spring.

BIOL  100 - Laboratory (0)

BIOL  102 - Laboratory (0)

BIOL  103 - Human Biology (4)

A course for non-majors surveying the major systems of the human body and introducing concepts of human health and disease. Two lectures and one laboratory weekly. Offered Fall and Spring.

BIOL  103 - Laboratory (0)

BIOL  105 - General Biology I (4)

Introduction to the principles and concepts of biology with emphasis on molecular biology and cell physiology. Intended for science majors and pre-med students. Not recommended for non- science students. Three hours lecture and one laboratory session each week. Offered every Fall and Spring.

BIOL  105 - Laboratory (0)

BIOL  106 - General Biology II (4)

Introduction to the principles and concepts of biology with emphasis on organismal biology and biological diversity. Intended for science majors and pre-med students. Not recommended for non- science students. Three hours lecture and one laboratory session each week. Offered every Fall and Spring.

BIOL  106 - Laboratory (0)

BIOL  108 - Biology of Human Aging (3)

A course for non-majors surveying basic human biology, biological theories of aging, aging-related changes in physiological and anatomical systems, and medical conditions associated with aging. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall.

BIOL  109 - Laboratory in Biology of Human Aging (1)

Laboratory exercises illustrating and examining topics covered in lecture. One laboratory session per week. Offered every Fall.

BIOL  113 - Human Anatomy (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 114. A survey of the structure of the tissues and organs in the human. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall and Spring. Intended for Nursing, Exercise and Sport Science students and related fields. Does not satisfy Biology major requirements. Offered every Fall and Spring. Majors restricted to Chemistry, Nursing, and Exercise and Sport Science.

BIOL  114 - Human Anatomy Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 113. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  115 - Survey of Human Physiology (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 116. Survey of the functions of tissues, organs and organ systems in the human with an emphasis on the mechanisms involved. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall and Spring. Intended for Nursing, Exercise and Sport Science students and related fields. Does not satisfy Biology major requirements. Offered every Fall and Spring. Majors restricted to Chemistry, Neuroscience, Nursing, and Exercise and Sport Science.

BIOL  116 - Laboratory in Survey of Human Physiology (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 115. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  134 - Microbiology (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 135. An elementary study of bacteria and other microorganisms causing disease and immunity. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall and Spring. Intended for Nursing, Exercise and Sport Science students and related fields. Does not satisfy Biology major requirements. Offered every Fall and Spring. Majors restricted to Chemistry, Nursing, and Exercise and Sport Science.

BIOL  135 - Microbiology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 134. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

BIOL  195 - Laboratory (0)

BIOL  205 - EMT Training (2)

This Emergency Medical Technician Training Course is designed to prepare and qualify a student to take the National Registry of EMTs (NREMT) written and practical exams for certification as an EMT. Does not satisfy Biology major requirements. Offered year-round.

BIOL  212 - Cell Physiology (4)

Study of cellular activities, with emphasis on the fundamental relationships between structure and function at the cellular and molecular levels. Four hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall and Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL - 105 with a minimum grade of C-; and BIOL - 106 with a minimum grade of C-; Pre- or corequisite CHEM - 236 or CHEM - 230.

BIOL  310 - Genetics (4)

Basic principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics covering both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Three hours lecture and one hour recitation each week. Offered every Fall and Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL - 212 with a minimum grade of C; Pre- or corequisite: CHEM - 230 or CHEM - 236 .

BIOL  310 - Genetics Lab (0)

One laboratory section each week examining genetics of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Offered every Fall and Spring. Corequisite: BIOL 310.

BIOL  319 - Ecology (4)

The principles of the structure and function of ecosystems and types of data/analyses utilized in order to study, e.g., energy flow, biogeochemical cycling, and population dynamics. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: Concurrent CHEM 231 or concurrent CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  320 - Human Physiology (3)

Survey of the function of the tissues, organs and organ systems in the human, with an emphasis on the mechanisms involved. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  321 - Human Physiology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 320. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  328 - Invertebrate Zoology (3)

A comparative syrvey of invertebate animals focusing on the evolution of morphological diversity and behavior. Emphasis will be on invertebrate taxa occupying habitats in the San Francisco Bay region. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 with minimum grade of C; CHEM 231 or 236 with a grade of D-.

BIOL  329 - Invertebrate Zoology Lab (1)

One laboratory or field trip each week to observe and experiment on living invertebrates. Co-requisite: BIOL 328

BIOL  330 - Female Biology (SL) (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C, or corequisite. Focuses on topics specific to females, including health issues, reproduction, genetics, evolution, sexuality, anatomy, physiology, neurobiology and behavior. Four hours lecture each week. Offered every other Fall.

BIOL  331 - Herpetology (3)

A study of the reptiles and amphibians of North America, with an emphasis placed on northern California species. Three lecture hours each week. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: Concurrent CHEM 231 or concurrent CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  332 - Herpetology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 331. One laboratory session or field trip each week. (May be some weekend field trips). Offered every Fall.

BIOL  333 - Endocrinology (3)

A study of basic endocrine function, hormonal mechanisms, endocrine disorders, and contemporary isuses in endocrinology. Three hours of lecture each week. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  334 - Endocrinology Laboratory (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 333. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  340 - Animal Toxicology (4)

Mechanisms of uptake, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity of selected chemicals in animals. Emphasis will be on toxicity to cells and organ systems. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minumum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  341 - Medical Microbiology (3)

An introduction to microbiology and survey of microbial pathogens, mechanisms of pathogenicity, and host responses. The emphasis is on microbes that cause disease in humans. Three hours of lecture each week. Offered every Spring.Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: BIOL - 342.

BIOL  342 - Laboratory in Medical Microbiology (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 341. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  345 - Virology (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C. Structure, replication, and genetics of viruses with emphasis on viruses that infect vertebrates and dynamics of host-virus interactions. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently.

BIOL  346 - General Microbiology (3)

An introduction to microorganisms: structure, metabolism, and biological properties. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: BIOL - 347.

BIOL  347 - Laboratory in General Microbiology (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 346. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  350 - Comparative Animal Physiology (4)

Animal physiology, from invertebrates to mammals, emphasizing basic physiological principles. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  355 - Developmental Biology (4)

An introduction to the processes of organismal development in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  356 - Developmental Biology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL 355. Laboratory exercises on cell, tissue and organ differentiation.

BIOL  362 - Histology (3)

A study of the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, and organs of the human body. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  363 - Histology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 362. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  365 - Human Anatomy (2)

A survey of the structure of the tissues and organs in the human. Two hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  366 - Human Anatomy Lab (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 365. Two laboratory sessions each week.

BIOL  368 - Neurobiology (4)

A study of basic neural function, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, disorders of the nervous system, and contemporary issues in neurobiology. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  370 - Biology of Cancer (SL) (4)

An introduction to cancer biology, including molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression, cancer diagnosis and treatment, and contemporary issues related to cancer. Four hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  379 - Conservation Biology (SL) (3)

A study of conservation biology, examining ecological methods for monitoring and maintaining biodiversity on the planet. Three hours lecture. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  380 - Conservation Biology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 379. One laboratory session or field trip each week. Some weekend trips are required.

BIOL  381 - California Wildlife (3)

A study of the natural history, phylogeny and ecology of the vertebrates, especially California species. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: Concurrent CHEM 231 or concurrent CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  382 - Laboratory in California Wildlife (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 381. One laboratory session or field trip each week. (This class may be scheduled on Saturdays.)

BIOL  383 - Biology of Insects (3)

An introduction to insects, including their morphology, physiology, systematics, natural history,and relationships with humans. Three hours of lecture each week. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: Concurrent CHEM 231 or CHEM 236, and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310. Corequisite: BIOL 384.

BIOL  384 - Biology of Insects Lab (1)

One laboratory session or field trip each week. Corequisite: BIOL 383.

BIOL  385 - General Parasitology (3)

A study of the major protistan and helminth parasites causing disease in animals and humans. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  386 - General Parasitology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 385. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  390 - Marine Biology (2)

A study of the natural history of marine organisms, exclusive of protozoa and insects, with emphasis on local intertidal invertebrates and fishes. Two hours lecture each week. (May be scheduled on Saturdays.) Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  391 - Marine Biology Lab (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 390. Two laboratory sessions or field trips each week. (May be scheduled on Saturdays. Some weekend trips are required.)

BIOL  392 - Oceanography (3)

An introduction to the major physical, chemical and biological factors in the marine environment. Special emphasis on the interaction of these variables in determining the ecology of the world's oceans. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: BIOL - 393.

BIOL  393 - Oceanography Laboratory (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 392. One laboratory session or field trip each week. (May be some weekend field trips.) Offered every Fall.

BIOL  395 - Special Topics in Biology (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C, or corequisite. This course treats topics not covered in other Biology courses, but of interest to faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Offered intermittently.

BIOL  395 - Laboratory (1)

BIOL  396 - Labratory (1)

BIOL  398 - Readings for Advanced Undergraduates (1 - 4)

Prerequisite: Minimum science GPA of 3.0 and consent of instructor and department chair. Inquiry into a specific topic requiring a literature search for current information, supervised by a faculty member with credit to be fixed in each case. Designed for outstanding upper-division students. (Note: There are restrictions on the maximum number of credits for 0201-398 that can be applied to upper division credit. See BIOL 498). Offered every Fall and Spring.

BIOL  405 - Molecular Medicine (4)

A study of the field of pharmacogenomics, which examines the genetic influence of drug responses in humans. Four hours lecture each week. Offered every other Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL 310 with minimum grade of C.

BIOL  414 - Evolution (4)

A study of modern evolutionary theory, including processes and patterns of evolution. Four hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall and Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C and completion of one upper division Biology Elective; Senior Standing; Minimum GPA of C.

BIOL  420 - Molecular Biology (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced study of the molecular basis of cell function, with an emphasis on the unifying principles and approaches that define the field of molecular biology. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently.

BIOL  443 - Immunology (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: BIOL - 444. Introduction to humoral and cell-mediated immunity in health and disease, with a focus on cellular and molecular immunology and immunochemistry. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall.

BIOL  444 - Immunology Laboratory (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 443. Principles of immunological techniques. A survey of those techniques used widely in diagnostics and research. One laboratory session each week.

BIOL  458 - Techniques in Light and Electron Microscopy (2)

Theory of light and electron microscope operation and preparation of biological specimens for microscopy. Two hours of lecture. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 or CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  459 - Techniques in Light and Electron Microscopy Lab (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 458. Preparation of biological specimens for light and electron microscopy. Two laboratory sessions each week.

BIOL  460 - Comparative Anatomy (4)

A phylogenetic study of the anatomy of the vertebrate classes. Three hours lecture and one laboratory session each week. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  464 - Photobiology (4)

A study of the effects of solar radiation on biological systems. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: Concurrent CHEM 231 or concurrent CHEM 236 and BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent BIOL 310.

BIOL  470 - Environmental Animal Physiology (3 - 4)

Principles of animal physiology and adaptive mechanisms. Three hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  471 - Laboratory in Environmental Animal Physiology (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 470. Project-oriented course with an emphasis on adaptive mechanisms and environmental toxicology. One laboratory session each week. Offered intermittently.

BIOL  481 - Techniques in Cell Biology (2)

Principles and practices of laboratory techniques used in cell biology. Two hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 with a minimum grade of C.

BIOL  482 - Laboratory in Techniques in Cell Biology (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 481. Two laboratory sessions each week.

BIOL  485 - Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology (2)

Prerequisite: BIOL - 310 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: BIOL - 486. Recombinant DNA techniques; methods of nucleic acid isolation and characterization. Two hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring.

BIOL  486 - Laboratory in Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 485. Two laboratory sessions each week.

BIOL  490 - Undergraduate Seminar in Biology (1)

Weekly seminar focusing on topics in Biology and preparation for careers in the biological sciences. Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 with minimum grades of C-.

BIOL  498 - Research for Advanced Undergraduates (1 - 4)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing, a minimum 3.0 GPA in Biology and supporting science courses (Chemistry, Math and Physics), consent of instructor and department chair. Selected upper division students have an opportunity to work on a research project under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Up to 4 units with 0201-398, 598 and 599 can be counted towards Biology upper division course requirements. Offered every Fall and Spring.

BIOL  499 - Honors Thesis (1 - 4)

BTEC  490 - SpTop:UG Seminar- Microbiology (1)

CBMN  101 - (4)

This course introduces students to the language of Tagalog. Particular emphasis will be given to facilitate the student’s ability to communicate in the praxis sites.

CBMN  102 - Filipino Lang. and Culture (2)

CBMN  310 - Philippine Politics and Governance (4)

The course seeks to study the actors, ideas, and the institutions of governing Philippine political system. The course looks into the theories that frame and reframe the analyses of events that describe continuity and change in Philippine politics.

CBMN  330 - Natural Resource Management and Sustainable Development (4)

This course looks at human-environmental relations through sociological and anthropological lenses/perspectives. Key concepts such as culture, social structure, and agency are applied to Philippine and Asian case studies that demonstrate how human interaction with the environment and their resource management practices are embedded in society’s norms, institutions, social organization and culture. Case studies will highlight different resource management regimes in the upland, coastal and urban environments. The course will also examine the iterative relationship between natural resource utilization and management practices and the prevailing development paradigm in particular societies.

CBMN  350 - Suffering, Solidarity and God (4)

This course will examine a range of philosophical and theological questions that emerge as students critically engage experiences of interconnection, solidarity, and suffering in their praxis communities.

CBMN  351 - Ignatian Spirituality (2)

CBMN  360 - Philippine Vis. and Perfor. Arts (4)

Philippine Visual and Preforming Arts develops understanding and appreciation of the various performing and visual arts in the Philippines. The course uses a practical, task-based learning strategy as its basic approach to understanding the arts and appreciating Philipine culture.

CBMN  370 - Gender, Equality and Women’s Empowerment in the Philippines (4)

This course will focus on the role of women in Filipino society. Particular attention will be given to women living in poverty as well as the area of human trafficking.

CBMN  371 - Inequalities of Class, Gender (4)

CBMN  380 - Accompaniment, Community, and Vocational Discernment (2)

This seminar will provide students with the chance to process their praxis experience in the communities. Emphasis will be given to the themes of accompaniment, community and discerning one’s vocation.

CBMN  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

CDS  100 - Ideal of Ctznshp:Hist Amer Ppl (4)

This course provides an introduction to the historic struggles of diverse Americans to be recognized as citizens of the United States. Using the framework of citizenship, the course explores the ways that systems of power and inequality have been both constructed and challenged throughout American history.

CDS  303 - Perform and Cultural Resistance (4)

Performance and Cultural Resistance studies how creative expression is central to the understanding, formation, and self-definition of historically marginalized communities across the United States of America. Students will study how socio-political theories and concepts manifest themselves as embodied practice in the realm of ritual and performance, and how the latter represent, record, and disseminate relationships of power, cultural resistance, and cultural affirmation.

CDS  390 - Special Topics (4)

CHEM  1 - Foundations of Chemistry (4)

Designed for students intending to take CHEM 111-113, with intensive study of problem solving. Offered every Fall.

CHEM  100 - Getting a Grip on Science: From Mass and Motion to Molecules (4)

This multidisciplinary introductory course for non-science majors fulfills Area B2 of the CORE. It explores several key topics including the solar system, energy and its forms, and the composition and behavior of atoms. Science is presented as a human endeavor through which we come to understand the natural world of which we are a part. Three lectures per week plus one two-hour lab session. Offered intermittently.

CHEM  100 - Laboratory (0)

CHEM  105 - Evolution and Human Origins (4)

How can we understand ourselves? In this interdisciplinary course we will examine the evidence that all life forms on earth, including human beings, have evolved from a common ancestor by means of natural selection. We will draw on ideas from biology, geology, paleontology, philosophy and history in order to gain an evolutionary perspective on what it means to be human. This lecture/lab course fulfills the CORE B2 Science requirement for non-science majors. Field trips during class time will include SF Zoo, SF Botanical Garden and Cal Academy of Science. Corequisite: CHEM 105L Laboratory.

CHEM  105 - Laboratory (0)

CHEM  106 - Chemistry in the Community (4)

This is an introductory chemistry course for non-science majors with a focus on green chemistry. The course is designed to teach students the principles of green chemistry and the importance of sustainability. We will consider issues that reflect today’s headlines such as ozone depletion, global warming, new energy sources, nutrition, genetic engineering and other topics that are connected to chemistry. The course will prepare students to respond in a thoughtful manner to these socially important issues and help them to become well-informed citizens. This lecture/lab course fulfills the CORE B2 science requirement for non-science majors.

CHEM  106 - Laboratory (0)

CHEM  110 - Molecular Gastronomy (4)

The lecture/lab course Molecular Gastronomy fulfills the Core B2 Science requirement for non-science majors. This course will focus on the science of food and drink, including pasta, coffee and ice cream. What happens on the molecular level when eggs are whipped? And why does popcorn pop? Such questions will form the basis for the science you will learn in lecture and underlie our approach to the laboratory component of the course where we will cook, scientifically examine (and eat) food. This course is for SII students only.

CHEM  110 - Laboratory (0)

CHEM  111 - General Chemistry I (3)

The first in a two-semester course sequence, this course introduces the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, periodicity of the elements, stoichiometry, properties of gases and of solutions. All students desiring Chem 111 must review tutorials and take the USF Chemistry Diagnostic Test on the USF Placement Test page. Based on your score you will be able to register for Chem 111/112L or Chem 001. Offered every semester and Summer.

CHEM  112 - Laboratory (1)

A laboratory course designed to accompany General Chemistry I. Emphasis is placed on experiments that illustrate the fundamental principles and laws of chemical behavior and engage students in cooperative data acquisition and analysis. Topics include accuracy/precision, qualitative analysis, titrations, atomic spectroscopy, properties of gases and of solutions. Assessment based on laboratory technique, pre-lab assignments, written laboratory reports, accuracy of analyses, and a final exam. One four-hour lab per week. Co/Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in CHEM 111, or prior completion of that course with a grade of C or higher. Offered every semester and Summer.

CHEM  113 - General Chemistry II (3)

The second in a two-semester course sequence, this course covers the principles of modern chemistry with an emphasis on quantitative problem solving. Topics include energy, equilibrium, kinetics, acids, bases and buffers, thermochemistry, redox chemistry and coordination compounds. Prerequisites: CHEM 111 and CHEM 112 Laboratory with a grade of C or higher; concurrent registration in CHEM 114 Laboratory. Offered every Spring and Summer.

CHEM  114 - Laboratory (1)

A laboratory course designed to accompany General Chemistry II. Topics include techniques of data analysis, thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases and buffers, electrochemistry and coordination chemistry. Wherever appropriate, computer skills are introduced and applied to data collection and analysis. Assessment based on laboratory technique, pre-lab assignments, written laboratory reports, accuracy of analyses, and a laboratory practical exam. One four-hour lab per week. Co/Prerequisites: CHEM 111 and CHEM 112 Laboratory with a grade of C or higher; concurrent registration in CHEM 113, or prior completion of that course with a grade of C or higher. Offered every Spring and Summer.

CHEM  191 - Wkshp in Gen Chem 111 (PLTL) (1)

Workshops are based on Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) which is a model of collaborative learning that supplements large lecture courses (www.pltl.org). In PLTL, 6-8 students work together to solve challenging problems in an active study group facilitated by a Peer Leader. The course instructor designs the problems based on the topics covered in Chem 111 and supervises/trains the Peer Leaders. Optional for Chem 111 students. Concurrent registration in Chem 111 is required. One session per week. Pass/Fail.

CHEM  193 - Wkshp in Gen Chem 113 (PLTL) (1)

Workshops are based on Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) which is a model of collaborative learning that supplements large lecture courses (www.pltl.org). In PLTL, 6-8 students work together to solve challenging problems in an active study group facilitated by a Peer Leader. The course instructor designs the problems based on the topics covered in Chem 113 and supervises/trains the Peer Leaders. Optional for Chem 113 students. Concurrent registration in Chem 113 is required. One session per week. Pass/Fail.

CHEM  195 - First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

CHEM  195 - Laboratory (0)

CHEM  230 - Organic Chemistry I (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 113 with grade of C (2.0) or higher. First semester of a two-semester course. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts necessary for understanding organic molecules. These include nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, radical and nucleophilic reactions, and spectroscopy. Offered every Fall and Summer.

CHEM  231 - Organic Chemistry II (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 230 with grade of C (2.0) or higher. Second semester of a two-semester course. Surveys the chemistry of functionalized organic compounds emphasizing mechanisms and multi-step syntheses. Offered every Spring and Summer.

CHEM  232 - Organic Chemistry Lab I (1)

Experimental course that highlights the concepts learned in lecture. Students will learn and employ techniques for the preparation, isolation, purification and characterization of organic molecules. Offered every Fall. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 230 or CHEM 236.

CHEM  233 - Organic Chemistry Lab II for Majors (2)

Experimental course emphasizing advanced laboratory techniques and concepts in organic chemistry. These include the handling of air-sensitive reagents, spectroscopic analysis of compounds, and the use of computational methods to complement experimental results. In addition, students will learn literature searching techniques and ACS-style writing. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: CHEM 230 with minimum grade of C and CHEM 232 with minimum grade of C. Not available to Biochemistry concentration majors.

CHEM  234 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 230 with minimum grade of C and CHEM 232 with minimum grade of C. For non-Chemistry Majors. A continuation of the first semester lab course. Students will gain more experience in multistep synthesis and analysis of products. Offered every Spring.

CHEM  236 - Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)

A survey of the fundamentals of organic chemistry. May be taken prior to, or along with, CHEM 232. This course may not be substituted for CHEM 230. Offered every Spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 113 with minimum grade of C-.

CHEM  260 - Analytical Chemistry (4)

An introduction to the principles and practices of analytical chemistry with an emphasis on quantitative methods. Classical methods such as titrimetric and volumetric analyses as well as basic instrumental methods involving spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and chromatography will be performed. There will be an emphasis on developing skills in professional report writing in the ACS style and project type work. Two laboratory meetings and two lectures weekly. Offered every Spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 113 with grade of C (2.0) or higher.

CHEM  260 - Laboratory (0)

CHEM  290 - Wkshop in Org Chem 230 (PLTL) (1)

Workshops are based on Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) which is a model of collaborative learning that supplements large lecture courses (www.pltl.org). In PLTL, 8-10 students work together to solve challenging problems in an active study group facilitated by an undergraduate Peer Leader. The course instructor designs the problems based on Chem 230 topics and trains the USF Student Peer Leaders. Optional for Chem 230 students. Concurrent registration in Chem 230 is required. One session per week. Pass/Fail.

CHEM  311 - Environmental Chemistry (4)

This course provides in-depth coverage of major topics in the chemistry of the environment, including tropospheric air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, aquatic chemistry, water pollution and water treatment, soil chemistry, and toxic organic compounds. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: CHEM 113 with a minimum grade of C-, and one of the following: ENVS 212, CHEM 230, or CHEM 236. Cross-listed with: ENVS 311.

CHEM  332 - Medicinal Chemistry (4)

An overview of the principles underlying the discovery, design, and development of modern medicines. Topics include: target identification; pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics; lead identification and optimization; and considerations for application to the clinic. Fulfills the elective option for the Major in Chemistry and the elective requirement for the Minor in Chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 231 (Organic Chemistry II), minimum grade of C.

CHEM  340 - Physical Chemistry I (4)

Prerequisites: CHEM - 113, PHYS - 210 and MATH - 110 with minimum grade of C. First semester of a two-semester sequence. The main topics are: thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and kinetics. Offered every Fall.

CHEM  341 - Physical Chemistry II (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM - 340 with minimum grade of C. Second semester of a two-semester sequence. The main topics are: quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical thermodynamics. Offered every Spring.

CHEM  350 - Biochemistry I (4)

First semester of a two-semester course. Surveys the physical and chemical properties of biomolecules and how these properties lead to observed biological functions. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 with minimum grade of C, or CHEM 236 with minimum grade of C, and BIOL 105 with minimum grade of C- and BIOL 106 with minimum grade of C- or permission of instructor.

CHEM  351 - Biochemistry II (4)

Second semester of a two-semester course. Surveys the major metabolic pathways and the control of metabolism at the nucleic acid and protein levels. Offered every Spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 350 with minimum grade of C.

CHEM  352 - Experimental Biochemistry (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM - 350 with minimum grade of C. Corequisite: CHEM - 351. Techniques commonly used in biochemical research, with emphasis upon protein and enzyme isolation and characterization. Instructor approval required. Priority given to Chemistry Majors with a Concentration in Biochemistry. Offered every other year.

CHEM  356 - Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4)

A survey of biochemical concepts emphasizing the nature of cell components, their interaction in metabolism and the regulation of metabolism. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: CHEM 231 with minimum grade of C, or CHEM 236 with minimum grade of C.

CHEM  386 - Special Topics in Chemistry (2 - 4)

Topics not covered by other Chemistry curriculum offerings. Pre-requisites: CHEM 113 and varies by topic.

CHEM  397 - Research Methods and Practice (1)

The primary purpose of the course will be a hands-on research experience as part of a faculty led research or scholarly project. Students must be accepted into a research group before adding the course, with priority given to majors who have completed Chem 231/260. In fall, all undergraduate researchers will meet periodically to evaluate the chemical literature, review safety and give an informal presentation. In addition, the faculty will assist students in writing a required research progress report from work completed in fall or the preceding summer. In spring, the course instructor will assist students in preparing a professional oral or graphical presentation of research for a campus, local and/or national meeting. A full written report is required for students in their final semester who are completing the optional ACS-certified degree. Offered every semester for 1 unit and can be repeated for a maximum of 4 units.

CHEM  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Study of selected topic, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. The consent of the instructor is required.

CHEM  399 - Undergraduate Research (1 - 2)

CHEM  410 - Integrated Laboratory (4)

In this laboratory course students will perform experiments designed to deepen instrumentation skills and build upon the conceptual material being delivered in the second semester P-Chem lecture course (CHEM 341). The introduction of quantum mechanics will allow a deeper discussion of spectroscopy and reaction kinetics. The conceptual basis of NMR will be elaborated upon and NMR spectroscopy will form a major element of the course. Offered every other Spring. Prerequisite: CHEM 340 with minimum grade of C.

CHEM  420 - Inorganic Chemistry (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 340 with minimum grade of C. Bonding, structure, and reactivity of the elements, inorganic, and organometallic compounds. In the laboratory students will perform experiments designed to: a) build upon foundational measurement taking and documenting skills learned in Analytical Chemistry (CHEM 260) as well as b) reinforce and extend the conceptual material being presented in the Physical Chemistry lecture course (CHEM 340), c) build upon previous lower division experience with Inorganic and Organic synthesis and characterization. Three lectures weekly and two laboratory periods. Offered every Fall.

CHEM  420 - Laboratory (0)

CHIN  101 - First Semester Chinese (4)

Intensive grammar, composition, conversation, reading. Stress on spoken language. Offered every Fall. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

CHIN  102 - Second Semester Chinese (4)

Prerequisite: CHIN - 101 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of CHIN 101. Offered every Spring. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

CHIN  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

CHIN  200 - Intro to Lang and Ling Theory (4)

This course will offer a general introduction to the basic methodology and main results of formal linguistic theory. Through the examination of linguistic phenomena and data, we will seek to provide some answers to basic questions about the nature of human language and present results, and the scientific reasoning behind them, from linguistic research that would lead to a conception of human language as a complex but law-governed mental system.

CHIN  201 - Third Semester Chinese (4)

Prerequisite: CHIN - 102 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of CHIN 102. Offered every Fall. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

CHIN  202 - Fourth Semester Chinese (4)

Prerequisite: CHIN - 201 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of CHIN 201. Offered every Spring. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

CHIN  301 - Third Year Chinese (4)

Prerequisite: CHIN - 202 or equivalent. Develops intermediate-to-advanced-level skills in oral and written expression, and introduces modern literary Chinese through texts such as newspapers, short stories, and essays.

CHIN  302 - Advanced Chinese: Contemporary Chinese Cinema (4)

Prerequisite: CHIN - 301 or equivalent. Develops intermediate-to-advanced level skills in oral and written expression, and introduces modern literary Chinese through newspaper articles, short stories, and literary essays.

CHIN  310 - Business Chinese I (4)

Business Chinese is a language course for students interested in international business and seeking a more in-depth perspective on contemporary Chinese business communications. It is aimed to enhance students' Chinese skills in everyday business situations and to promote their understanding of the business environments and culture in the contemporary China. Class will be taught in Chinese. Prerequisite: three semesters of Chinese or equivalent language proficiency.

CHIN  320 - Introduction to Chinese Linguistics (4)

This course provides an introduction to basic concepts in Chinese linguistics. It surveys the most important elements of the Chinese language, its structure, dialects, and writing system from contemporary linguistic perspectives. It also covers such topics as history of the language, dialectal variations, language and culture, language planning, language use in society, and Chinese computing. The course will be conducted mainly in lectures in combination with discussions of assigned readings, hands-on activities and in-class exercises. Class will be taught in English. No prerequisite is required.

CHIN  330 - Chinese/Old Gold Mountain (SL) (4)

This course surveys the history of San Francisco’s Chinese community, including topics like immigration, economic development, and political protest. It is conducted primarily in Mandarin, with some lectures and discussions in English where appropriate. Satisfies the Service Learning (SL) requirement. Prerequisite: CHIN 301 (Advanced Chinese) or equivalent fluency.

CHIN  350 - Traditional Chinese Culture (CD) (4)

A history of the literati arts of landscape and bird and flower painting, calligraphy, and zither music, along with closely affiliated pursuits such as poetry, garden design, religious or literary pilgrimage, and philosophical contemplation. The impact of literati culture on Japan, Korea, and elsewhere is also covered.

CHIN  355 - Chinese Literature in Translation (4)

An introduction to significant examples of classical and modern literature, with emphasis on fiction, drama, and poetry (shi and ci). Offered every Fall.

CHIN  381 - Modern China: Rev and Moderniz (4)

A broad survey of China since 1840, emphasizing China's response to the West and the impact of the Revolutions of 1911 and 1949. Offered every other year.

CHIN  384 - The Rise of China Since Mao (4)

A comprehensive survey of the enormous changes, yet also important continuities, in China¿s domestic and foreign policy since 1978. Important themes include the transition to a market economy or ¿market Leninism¿; environmental impacts and the sustainability of growth; population policy; military modernization and the ¿China threat¿ scenario; village democracy and human rights issues; changing attitudes to sex and sexuality; and the search for values both new and traditional. Offered every other year.

CHIN  386 - History of U.S.-China Relations (4)

A study of the United States-China relations from the 1780s to the present day, with special emphasis on the period since 1945. Offered every other year.

CHIN  398 - Dir Reading and Research (1 - 4)

The written permission of the instructor, the department chair and the dean is required. Offered every semester.

CLAS  110 - Ancient Epic and the Classical World (4)

The development of epic, epic hero, and the social backdrop of epic in ancient Greece and Rome. Of special importance are the influence of Homer on Virgil and Virgil's originality.

CLAS  120 - Classical Mythology (4)

An introduction to the principle myths of ancient Mediterranean society, particularly those of ancient Greece and Rome, with an emphasis on the transformation of primary mythic themes (e.g., origin of the gods, creation, the mythic hero) in a variety of historical, cultural, and social contexts.

CLAS  205 - History and War in Antiquity (4)

The classical world as portrayed in present film. Ancient Greek and Roman texts are examined through modern films with classical themes. The interdependence of war and social phenomena is examined. The readings and films are analyzed from historical, cultural, and modern perspectives.

CLAS  210 - Ancient Epic and the Classical World (4)

The development of epic, epic hero, and the social backdrop of epic in ancient Greece and Rome. Of special importance are the influence of Homer on Virgil and Virgil's originality.

CLAS  315 - Greek and Roman Religion (4)

An examination of the major religious themes and practices of ancient Greeks and Romans. While we will survey historical developments, our focus will be on the Classical Period for the Greeks and the Imperial Period for the Romans. Special consideration will be given to the relationship between beliefs, rituals and concerns of the state, as well as various reactions to "state religion" by philosophers, practitioners in mystery cults, Jews, and Christians.

CLAS  320 - Gender and Power in Antiquity (4)

The course links the study of gender and sexuality to the values and practices of power in ancient Greece and Rome. The readings trace the articulation of gender historically through epic, lyric, Greek tragedy, Plato's moral position, and Roman pronouncements and orientations. The readings are substantiated by illustrations from Greek and Roman art.

CLAS  322 - Classical Rhetoric (4)

This course examines the creation and emergence of classical rhetorical theories and practices from early to late antiquity. Students will read, analyze and research the varying rhetorical traditions that helped shape educational practices and civic debate within different social contexts. This class is a Writing Intensive course. Passing this class with a B- or better counts toward the Certificate in Rhetoric and Writing. This class also counts as an elective toward the Interdisciplinary Minor in Classical Studies.

CLAS  390 - Special Topics in Classical studies (4)

Prerequisites: CLAS 110 or SII 100 or THETR 301. A varying series of topics examined by means of critical theory, research methods and cultural context. Topics include mythology, political theater, gender and the classical world, ancient arts. Offered every year.

CLAS  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

CMPL  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

CMPL  200 - Intro to Comp Studies (CD): Cultures in Conflict (4)

A substantial introduction to the basic principles and concepts needed for understanding and comparing works of literature and cultures from different parts of the world. Students will read and analyze a selection of literary works with a comparative focus, be it a genre, a time period, a cross-disciplinary theme or its relevance to another discipline. This course is required for all majors and minors in CMPL.

CMPL  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

CMPL  299 - Critical Analysis (4)

This course builds on the analytical and critical skills developed in CMPL 195 or 200 through examination of the major methodologies of Twentieth Century literary theories.

CMPL  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

CMPL  399 - Critical Analysis (4)

This course builds on the analytical and critical skills developed in English 190 and 191 through examination of the major methodologies of Twentieth Century literary theories. Offered every Fall.

CMPL  400 - Capstone Seminar: Political Fiction (4)

Prerequisites: CMPL 200 ENGL 390 and senior standing. A course that integrates the comparative knowledge and skills derived from previous work in a seminar setting and a significant research project. Offered every Spring.

COMS  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

COMS  202 - Rhetoric and the Public Sphere (4)

This course focuses on the history and theory of rhetoric as an art central to public life, exploring the ways that language affects how we construct knowledge, create communities, delimit social space, promote our collective interests, and cirtique the laws and norms that bind us together. Offered every semester. Co-requisite: CORE A2

COMS  203 - Communication and Everyday Life (4)

This course examines how the communication experiences in daily life - interactions with friends, family, significant others, peers, and coworkers - are illuminated by interpersonal communication theory.  Throughout this course, students engage with a variety of materials designed to enhance both their analytic and experiential knowledge about everyday communication. Offered every semester. Co-requisite: CORE A2

COMS  204 - Communication and Culture (CD) (4)

This introduction to the field of communication examines how cultures and sub-cultures differ in their language use, and how their communicative practices shape the production, interpretation, and reproduction of social meanings. Students will learn how to conduct fieldwork to study everyday cultural communication. Offered every semester. Co-requisite: CORE A2

COMS  252 - Critical and Rhetorical Methods (4)

This course explores methods for close textual reading and analysis. Students study a number of theoretical approaches to rhetorical criticism and apply those theories in analyzing speeches, essays, images, public spaces, and other texts. Offered every semester. Pre-requisite: COMS 202 or permission from instructor.

COMS  253 - Quantitative Research Methods (4)

This course explores methods for understanding and conducting experimental and survey research. Students study a number of approaches encompassed in empirical research methods and apply those data analysis techniques in reading, designing, and analyzing quantitative research. Offered every semester. Pre-requisite: COMS 203 or permission from instructor.

COMS  254 - Qualitative Methods (4)

This course explores methods for understanding and conducting qualitative research. Students will learn and practice a number of approaches to qualitative data collection such as interviewing, focus group, participant-observation, and audio/video recording and inductive data analysis techniques that analyze meaning and understanding in communication. Students will practice the skills of reading, designing and analyzing qualitative research. Pre-requisite: COMS 204 or permission from instructor.

COMS  255 - From Acupuncture to Yoga (4)

This introduction to the social scientific study of holistic health care examines the role of communication in complementary and alternative medicine settings in the U.S. Students will have the opportunity to try holistic health practices in class. This class does not count toward the COMS major/minor.

COMS  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

COMS  300 - Interpersonal Communication (4)

This course focuses on the inherent link between communication and relationships. Specifically the course examines the role of communication in three phases of personal relationships: development, maintenance, and dissolution. Prequesities: COMS 203 AND (COMS 205, 253 or 254).

COMS  302 - The Dark Side of Interpersonal/Family Communication (4)

This course sets out to explore research and theory that illuminates the dark side of interpersonal and family communication and provides an orientation for understanding the dark side as inseparable from the brighter side in understanding human communication. Prerequisite: COMS 203 AND (COMS 205, 253 or 254) or permission from instructor.

COMS  306 - Family Communication (4)

This course will focus on the central role that communication plays in family life. Some topics covered include: family forms, family systems and communication patterns, family rituals and stories, conflict, and family stress. Pre-requisite: COMS 203 AND (COMS 205, 253 or 254) or permission from instructor.

COMS  314 - Intercultural Communication (CD) (4)

Analysis of major variables affecting interpersonal communication between persons of different cultural and subcultural backgrounds. Pre-requisite: COMS/ANTH 204 or permission from instructor.

COMS  315 - Asian American Culture and Communication (4)

This course explores the communication patterns of Asian Pacific Americans. Students will examine cultural practices, language, and discourse and how these construct shared and contested individual and collective identities. Pre-requisite: CORE A2 or permission from instructor.

COMS  320 - Public Relations Principles and Practices (4)

This course focuses on the inherent link between communication and relationships. Specifically the course examines the role of communication in three phases of personal relationships: development, maintenance, and dissolution. Prequesities: COMS 203 AND (COMS 205, 253 or 254).

COMS  322 - Advertising Public Relations Law and Ethics (4)

An investigation of legal and ethical concerns in public relations. Using actual public relations cases, students assess the ethical dilemmas presented and devise ethical, theoretically sound solutions. Offered every Spring. Pre-requisite: CORE A1 and A2

COMS  323 - Public Relations Writing (4)

Public relations writing employs a variety of styles, formats, message structures, and technologies in the design, implementation, and evaluation of communication programs. Students apply advanced persuasive strategies across a variety of print and electronic media. Offered every Fall. Pre-requisite: CORE A2 AND COMS 320. (COMS 320 may be taken concurrently.)

COMS  326 - Public Relations Campaigns (4)

Using a combination of case-study and experiential approaches, students learn to create communication programs for nonprofit organizations. Topics covered include planning, strategic and ethical message construction, risk assessment, and crisis management. Offered every Spring. Pre-requisite: COMS 320

COMS  334 - Rhetoric and Citizenship (SL) (4)

This course inquires into citizenship as an everyday practice and political discourse in relation to public culture. It focuses on rhetorical theories of collective-world making and analysis of case studies in citizenship. Offered every Fall.

COMS  335 - Rhetoric of Social Movements (SL) (4)

This service-learning course examines how social movements employ rhetoric to bring about social change. We will study the foundations of social movement theory while examining various historical movements in order to understand how rhetorical strategies and techniques move various audiences to action. Pre-requisite: COMS 202

COMS  336 - Rhetoric of Law (4)

This course offers students both a theoretical understanding of the relationship between rhetoric and law, as well as the practical knowledge of how to read, engage and critique legal texts addressing a specific social problem or legal question.

COMS  337 - Rhetorics of Sex, Gender, and Sexuality. (4)

This course investigates how discourses structure and critique our experiences of sex, gender, and sexuality. Students will be introduced to a variety of theories about gender and sexuality that will help them analyze and evaluate everyday discourses and objects. Pre-requisite: COMS 202 or permission of the instructor.

COMS  344 - Environmental Communication (4)

This course explores conceptual frameworks for understanding the relationship between communication, culture, and the environment. Students will critically analyze discourse about the environment from a number of contexts (social movement rhetoric, mass and social media, public deliberation, and popular culture) and also develop applied environmental communication skills.

COMS  350 - Nonverbal Communication (4)

Theoretical approaches and methods to study nonverbal communication. Focus on individual and cultural differences; functions by stage and type of social relationships. Offered every Fall. Pre-requisite: COMS 203 AND (COMS 205, 253 or 254) or permission from instructor.

COMS  352 - Health Communication (4)

This class examines communication's role in maintaining, creating, and promoting health. Some topics covered include: practitioner-patient communication, ethnicity and health, social support, gender and health, health campaigns, media and health, and health beliefs. Pre-requisie: COMS 253 (or COMS 205) or permission from instructor.

COMS  356 - Organizational Comm. (SL) (4)

An analysis of the communication theories used to explore the complex structures and processes within organizational settings. Pre-requisites: COMS 252 or COMS 254.

COMS  358 - Persuasion and Social Influence (4)

The study of behavior, attitude formation and change, and the principles of persuasion. Offered every Fall. Prerequisite: COMS 205 or 253

COMS  360 - Language and Social Interaction (4)

This class explores language in use including how people use language to accomplish tasks, create meaning, and interact with one another. Students will learn language components such as phonetics, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics in relation to the communication process. Examines sociolinguistics, roles in prejudice, differences in language use in functional communication skills. Pre-requisite: COMS/ANTH 204 or permission from instructor.

COMS  364 - Communication for Justice and Social Change (SL) (4)

This service-learning seminar looks cross-culturally at the issue of justice and social change in various communicative environments - from courtrooms to non-governmental organizations, to the media and international assemblies. The course will explore the communicative practices involved in legal proceedings, human rights, conflict resolution, and the struggle for social justice and change. Using a format that combines lectures, discussions, and student's service-learning projects, we will tackle issues such as the communicative nature of conflict; the unequal access to justice and other social resources; the debate over universal vs. relativistic human rights; the cultural and communicative practices involved in conflict and its resolution; the link between power and communication. Pre-requisite: CORE A2 or permission from instructor.

COMS  365 - Geographies of Communication (4)

This course explores how our experience of communication is shaped by the physical realities of communication media: transportation routes, cable lines, switchboards, relay stations, GPS and communication satellites, computer networks, cellular towers, and the fiber optic layout of the postmetropolis. Such media generate a communicative environment, or infosphere, that empowers a growing number of people with the electronic capabilities to produce and disseminate communication all other the world. In this class we will use contemporary communicative theories to study how geography and communication interact. Pre-requisite: CORE A2 or permission from instructor.

COMS  366 - The Ethnography of Communication (SL) (4)

Students in this service-learning seminar will explore the communicative practices of various organizations concerned with social justice through ethnographic participant observation in a community non-profit organization. Readings from cultural and communication theory will provide the conceptual background for their fieldwork. Prerequisite: COMS/ANTH 204 or permission from instructor.

COMS  368 - Communication and Aging (4)

Communication and Aging examines the construction of what it means to age and be "old", spedifically, the communication processes inherent in this phenomenon, the impact of aging on human relationship/communication, and communication in contexts involving and impacting older adults. Pre-requisite: COMS 203 or permission from instructor.

COMS  370 - Message Design and Health Interaction (4)

An advanced course designed to provide an understanding of the communication processes in health-related interaction. Specifically, the curriculum addresses the types of health-related messages produced, their pragmatic goal, the known effectiveness of these messages, and the theoretical and methodological concerns when examining messages used in health-related interaction in a medical context. Prerequisite: COMS 205 or 253 or permission from instructor.

COMS  372 - Communication, Disability, and Social Justice (SL) (4)

An advanced service-learning course designed to examine the attitudes and perceptions of and toward persons with disabilities, how communication creates and perpetuates an inaccurate and unjust depiction of disabled persons, the communicative behaviors of persons who are disabled and the nondisabled during their interaction, and how theories of communication and social justice can illuminate how this socially interactive inequity may be remedied. Prerequisite: COMS 205 or 253 or permission from instructor.

COMS  373 - Rhetorical History of the US (4)

This course explores the history of the United States from the perspective of the rhetoric that shaped historical events. It examines how history has been made and re-made rhetorically. The course analyzes radical social movements and rhetorics of dissent; struggles to expand the public sphere and citizenship rights; the uses of cultural memory; and symbolic constructions of 'America'. Pre-requisite: COMS 202 or permission from instructor.

COMS  390 - Special Topics in Communication Studies (2 - 4)

COMS  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

A faculty supervised program of reading and study in communication. May be repeated for credit. Requires written permission of instructor, chair, and dean. See COMS website for full guidelines. Offered every semester.

COMS  399 - Directed Project (1 - 4)

A faculty supervised project (such as internship or research experience) for credit. DOES NOT count toward the COMS major. Students can accumulate a maximum 8 units.

COMS  405 - Capstone Seminar: Asian American Studies (4)

Prerequisites: SOC - 228 and PHIL - 275. As the culmination of the certificate program in Asian American studies, this course requires students to integrate the content and models of core and elective courses into a coherent grid of analysis and agenda for social action. A primary component of this course will be service-learning activities in collaboration with local and regional Asian Pacific American community agencies. Students will be required to submit a capstone portfolio, including a thesis paper, at the end of the semester that integrates their service-learning experiences with their academic foundation. Offered Spring 2003.

COMS  490 - Topics in Communication Studies (4)

Advanced topics not examined in regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit. This class counts toward the COMS major/minor.

COMS  496 - Communication Studies Internship (4)

Field experience in a setting that relates communication study to the student's professional goals. Students may count no more than four (4) credits of Internship credit toward the major. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing.

CS  103 - Web Programming (4)

This course provides students who are not computer science majors with an introduction to web programming. The course focuses on the design and development of web sites and applications, emphasizing problem solving, design, and deployment in the real world.

CS  106 - Computers, Genes, and Society (4)

We’ll investigate how computer science, biology and math come together in Bioinformatics to impact our lives. We’ll study applications of Bioinformatics, such as CSI and gene therapy, including ethical concerns. We’ll use simple Bioinformatics tools and propose policy. No prerequisites.

CS  107 - Computing, Mobile Apps, and the Web (4)

An introduction to computer science for non-majors with little prior programming experience. Students develop programs using visual and high-level programming languages to control robots, create animated simulations, and build Internet and general applications. In addition, students are exposed to an overview of computing and its influence on modern society. Offered Fall and Spring.

CS  110 - Introduction to Computer Science I (4)

Use of procedures, parameter passing, block structures, data types, arrays, abstract data structures, conditional control, iterative and recursive processes, and input/output in programming solutions to a variety of problems. Top-down and bottom-up design and functional decomposition to aid in the development of programs. Four hours lecture and two hours lab. Offered Fall and Spring.

CS  112 - Introduction to Computer Science II (4)

Prerequisite: CS 110 (grade of C or better). Design and development of significantly sized software using top-down design and bottom-up implementation. Dynamically allocated data, object-oriented programming, architecture of memory, basics of language translation, and basics of algorithm analysis. Development of simple graphical user interfaces. Four hours lecture. Offered Fall and Spring.

CS  131 - Creating Images: Photoshop I (2)

Prerequisite: Basic Windows or Macintosh skills. First in a two-part series. Introduction to image design, manipulation and processing for utilization in print, on the web and photographically. Acquiring images through scanning, from the Web and other sources. Introduction to Adobe Photoshop tools and palettes. Use of Photoshop tool in image correction, development and collaging. Students develop a portfolio of images. Taught in lecture/lab format using Adobe Photoshop. Offered Fall/Spring.

CS  132 - Creating Images: Photoshop II (2)

Second in a two-part series. Introduction to image design, manipulation and processing for utilization in print, on the web and photographically. Painting, filling, and layering techniques. Masks, channels, electronic photo retouching, use of pen tool to create paths. Students develop a portfolio of images. Taught in lecture/lab format using Adobe Photoshop.

CS  141 - Word Processing (2)

Basic word processing including the creation, editing, merging and printing of documents. Block operations, search and replace, spell checking, footnotes, headers/footers, and type styling. Taught in lecture/lab format with exercises selected from contemporary word processors such as Microsoft Word. Offered Fall and Spring.

CS  142 - Creative Tools: Publishing I (2)

Survey of desktop publishing systems and capabilities, including document import, layout, page formatting, zooming, printer and font setup. Enhancing publications through graphics; basic drawing tools; captions, logos, and photographs; cropping and panning techniques. Taught in lecture/lab format using Adobe Pagemaker.

CS  143 - Desktop Publishing II (2)

Wrapping text around graphics. Adjusting text through manual kerning. Use of templates, style sheets, and clip art. Production of brochures, reports, journal articles, advertisements, newspapers, artistic works, books, etc. Taught in lecture/lab format using Adobe Pagemaker.

CS  151 - Spreadsheet Analysis: Introductory (2)

Learn to use Microsoft Excel as a spreadsheet tool to analyze and manage data. Topics: Windows Explorer, workbook window, menus, toolbars, commands, basic formulas, editing and formatting, simple functions, print options, opening/closing workbooks, worksheets, file management, numeric labels, values, date formats, serial dates, date calculation, mathematical operators, and relative versus absolute cell referencing. Taught in lecture/lab format using Microsoft Excel. Offered Fall/Spring.

CS  152 - Spreadsheet Analysis: Intermediate (2)

Learn to use Microsoft Excel as a spreadsheet tool to analyze data using advanced features, functions and charts. This course prepares students for CSSV 153. Topics: Charts (pie, column, line, area, bar, combination, exploding, 3-D), data mapping, link workbooks, 3-D formulas, IF functions, Lookup functions (vertical and horizontal), inserting comments, color fonts and background, autoformat, lock, protect and hide data or worksheets. Taught in lecture/lab format using Microsoft Excel. Offered Fall/Spring.

CS  161 - Database Computing I (2)

Overview of the design of database management systems and issues in the design of a relational database schema. Introduction to database creation, editing, querying, and report generation using a commercial database system. Taught in lecture/lab format.

CS  162 - Designing and Using Relational Databases (2)

Application of basic principles to the design of relational databases: elimination of partial, transitive, and multivalued dependencies. Customized forms and reports. Importing and exporting data. Linking databases with the world-wide web. Taught in lecture/lab format.

CS  171 - Introduction to Web Site Design (2)

Introduction to the Internet, web browsers, and e-mail. Procedures for accessing information on the web, including the use of search engines. Survey of major information sources. Taught in lecture/lab format. Offered Fall/Spring.

CS  177 - Web 2.0: Blogs, Wikis, Maps and Apps (2)

As Tim Berners-Lee originally conceived the World-Wide Web, it should be user oriented and driven. With Web 2.0, it is finally getting there. With this course you should be able to use and set up your own Web 2.0 facilities, such as blogs (weblogs), wikis (information communities), and combinations such as RSS, mashups, tagging, and social networking; appreciate and evaluate the range of modern interactive applications on the World Wide Web; find and explore innovative interactive sites; and imagine the advances coming on the Web. Lecture and lab combined. No programming experience required.

CS  181 - Presentation with PowerPoint (2)

Planning, production, and implementation of computer-based multimedia presentations. Editing and formatting slides for individual and large-group presentations. Using ClipArt, WordArt, drawing tools and AutoShapes. Creating organization charts. Includes text, graphics, charts, tables, and templates. Involves individual student projects. Taught in lecture/lab format using PowerPoint software. Offered Fall/Spring.

CS  182 - Animations with Flash (2)

Practical Series in Computer Science. This course focuses on computer animation using Adobe Flash. Students develop skills in animation including: drawing, painting, and creating text in Flash. Importing and modifying images fro illustrator, Photoshop, and other programs. Working with layers. Creating symbols. Using the library for storing images and movie clips. Shape and motion tweening. Traditional animation techniques. Use of timelines and keyframes. Using sound. Creating buttons. Involves individual student projects. Taught in lecture/lab format. Offered Fall/Spring.

CS  183 - Creating Animated Interfaces with Flash (2)

Introduction to animated multimedia presentations. Designing productions using techniques combining graphics, animation, sound, clip art, and interactivity. Involves individual student projects. Taught in lecture/lab format using MacroMedia Director software or equivalent.

CS  186 - Special Topics in Computer Science (1 - 4)

Topics not covered by other CS curricular offerings. Students may register for this class in more than one semester. Consent of instructor required. Offered intermittently.

CS  191 - Computer Graphics and Animation (2)

Three-dimensional virtual worlds created with the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) for use in worldwide web pages. Basic structures and adjustment of predefined simple and complex scenes. Survey of higher level tools for creating VRML worlds and other approaches to 3D web content. Taught in lecture/lab format using proprietary software and shareware.

CS  192 - 3D Computer Graphics: Modeling and Rendering (2)

Procedures used to construct three-dimensional computer graphics images; examples of 3D modeling paradigms (e.g., wireframe, functions, procedures); surface treatments (color, shading, texture and bump mapping); and rendering methods (raytracing, rasterization); demonstrations and hands-on model and 3D still-image creation. Taught in lecture/lab format using proprietary software and shareware. Offered every Spring.

CS  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

CS  212 - Software Development (4)

Advanced programming topics including inheritance and polymorphism, multi-threaded programming, networking, database programming, and web development. Techniques for debugging, refactoring, and reviewing code. Prerequisite: CS 112 (grade of C or better).

CS  220 - Introduction to Parallel Computing (4)

Introduction to the C programming language. Overview of parallel architectures. Programming shared and distributed memory parallel computers. Parallel program performance evaluations. Four hours lecture. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: CS 110 (grade of B or better) and permission of instructor or CS 112 (grade of C or better).

CS  221 - C and Systems Programming (4)

Introduction to the C programming language and UNIX/Linux systems programming. Pointers in C, libraries, devices, processes, threads, system calls, memory management, and interprocess communication with sockets. Prerequisite: CS 110.

CS  245 - Data Structures and Algorithms (4)

Prerequisites: CS 112 (grade of C or better) and MATH 201 (grade of C or better). Algorithm analysis and asymptotic running time calculations. Algorithm design techniques and implementation details. Algorithms for sorting and searching, trees, graphs, and other selected topics. Four hours lecture. Offered every Spring.

CS  286 - Special Topics in Computer Science (1 - 4)

Topics not covered by other CS curricular offerings. Students may register for this class in more than one semester. Consent of instructor required. Offered intermittently.

CS  315 - Computer Architecture (4)

Prerequisites: CS 220 or 221 (grade of C or better). Performance analysis techniques, instruction set design, computer arithmetic, digital design, processor implementation, and memory systems. Performance enhancement using pipelining and cache memory. Four hours lecture and two hours lab. Offered every Spring.

CS  315 - Laboratory (0)

CS  326 - Operating Systems (4)

Prerequisites: CS 220 (grade of C or better) and CS 245 (grade of C or better). The design and implementation of operating systems. Study of processes, threads, scheduling, synchronization, interprocess communication, device drivers, memory management, and file systems. Four hours lecture and two hour lab. Offered every Fall.

CS  326 - Laboratory (0)

CS  333 - Intro to Database Systems (4)

Prerequisites: CS 112 (grade of C or better) and CS 245 (grade of C or better).Data modeling, record storage, and file organization; database theory; relational, hierarchical, and network models; database management systems and query languages, programming language interfaces to databases; web-based client-server development. Four hours lecture.

CS  336 - Computer Networks (4)

Prerequisites: CS 112 (grade of C or better); CS 245 recommended. Current methods and practices in the use of computer networks to enable communication. Physical and architectural elements, and layered models of networks. Communication protocols and associated algorithms; local and wide area networks; network security. Four hours lecture.

CS  345 - Prog Language Paradigms (4)

Prerequisites: CS 112 (grade of C or better); CS 245 (grade of C or better). Syntax, semantics, concepts, capabilities, and implementation details of several different programming languages, including imperative, functional, object oriented, and logical languages. Comparative advantages and disadvantages of different languages and paradigms. Four hours lecture. Offered every Fall.

CS  360 - Data Visualization (4)

Introduces students to the field of data visualization. Covers basic design and evaluation principles, how to acquire, parse, and analyze large datasets, and standard visualization techniques for different types of data. Utilizes the Processing programming language and environment for rapid visualization prototyping. Prerequisite: CS 212 (grade of C or better).

CS  385 - Special Lecture Series in Computer Science (1)

Weekly colloquium and discussion session on current developments in various aspects of computer science. Students may register for this course in more than one semester. Majors must take this course at least twice. One hour lecture. Offered Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: CS 112 with a grade of C or better.

CS  386 - Special topics in Computer Science (1 - 4)

Topics not covered by other CS curricular offerings. Students may register for this class in more than one semester. Consent of instructor required. Offered intermittently.

CS  398 - Directed Reading and Research (1 - 4)

Written permission of the instructor, chairperson, and dean is required.

CS  411 - Automata Theory (4)

Prerequisites: MATH 201 (grade of C or better) and MATH 202 (grade of C or better). Finite state automata with bounded and unbounded memory. Regular languages and expressions. Context-free languages and grammars. Push-down automata and Turing machines. Undecidable languages. P versus NP problems and NP-completeness. Four hours lecture. Offered every Fall.

CS  414 - Compilers (4)

Prerequisites: CS 245 (grade of C or better); CS 345 recommended and CS 411 recommended. Lexical analysis, parsing, semantic analysis, and code generation. Optimization techniques. Compiler design tools and compiler compilers. Four hours lecture. Offered every Spring.

CS  419 - Computer Graphics (4)

Prerequisites: CS 112 (grade of C or better) and MATH 202 (grade of C or better), or permission of instructor. Theory and production of interactive computer graphics. Topics chosen from graphics programming and algorithms, modeling, rendering, ray-tracing, and animation. Four hours lecture.

CS  420 - Game Engineering (4)

Study of the design and implementation of 3D Computer Games. Topics include 3D Modeling and Texturing, 3D Math (including rotational and trannslational matricies and quaternions), collision detection, physics engines, and 3D Graphics engines. Prerequisites: CS 245 with a minimum grade of C and CS 212 with a minimum grade of C

CS  430 - Numerical Analysis (4)

Prerequisites: CS 112 (grade of C or better) and MATH 202 (grade of C or better). Floating point representation of numbers, error analysis, root finding, interpolation, numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solution of linear systems, numerical solution of differential equations. Four hours lecture.

CS  461 - Logic for Computer Science and Math (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 201 (grade of C or better), or permission of instructor. Propositional and predicate calculus, syntax and semantics, formal theories, logic programming, lambda calculus. Applications of logic to computer science and mathematics. Four hours lecture.

CS  480 - Computers and Society: Privacy, Security, Ethics, and Service (4)

Prerequisite: CS 112 (grade of C or better), or permission of instructor. Computer and network security measures; encryption protocols. Ethical theory and applications in computing. Seminar discussion on value systems, social impact, and human factors, and about use and misuse of computers. Four hours lecture.

CS  486 - Special Topics in Computer Science (1 - 4)

Topics not covered by other CS curricular offerings. Students may register for this class in more than one semester. Consent of instructor required. Offered intermittently.

CS  490 - Senior Team Project (4)

Prerequisite: CS 212 (grade of C or better) and senior standing. Students working in teams investigate, specify, design, implement, test, document, and present to their classmates a significant software project. Sound software engineering practicies are presented in lectures and used to evaluate each stage of the project. Written and verbal communication is emphasized through frequent documentation submissions, informal group discussions, code walk-throughs, and student presentations. With the instructor's permission, the course may be repeated for credit. Four hours lecture. Offered Fall and Spring.

CS  498 - Directed Reading and Research (1 - 4)

Written permission of the instructor, chairperson, and dean is required.

DANC  110 - Beginning Dance/Creative Movement Series (1 - 2)

Introductory classes in various dance styles and techniques including ballet, jazz dance, modern dance, tap, social and ballroom, swing, flamenco, ethnic/folk dance and creative movement. (Course may be repeated for credit.)

DANC  141 - Music for Dancers (1 - 2)

This course will introduce students to ways of understanding and utilizing music and sound as part of the process of dance-making. In addition to learning fundamental musical concepts, students will also learn basic sound editing skills in the creation of their own music/sound scores. The combined practice of studying and making music will develop student's abilities to communicate musical problems and ideas clearly and knowledgeably to dancers, choreographers, musicians and composers

DANC  150 - Dance Appreciation (4)

The course provides an overview of theater, dance, and musical theater focusing on the current state of the arts, but also examining their roots and possible futures. Areas covered include scenography, costuming, movement, acting and directing, forms of dance, choreography, theater and dance criticism.

DANC  151 - Partnering and Contact Improvisation (1 - 2)

This class will develop basic partnering skills for contemporary dancers. To cultivate effective means for moving in contact with another body, we will research breath, finding one's center, sharing weight, harnessing momentum and stillness.

DANC  161 - Body in Performance: Laban (1 - 2)

This course provides an introduction to Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals and their applications to movement description, observation, and execution. Students in all artistic disciplines will develop physical approaches to their training that address core support, postural concerns, injury prevention and rehabilitation. Through the cultivation of a vital, conscious relationship with one's body, dancers, actors and musicians will become aware of personal movement patterns that help and/or hinder expressive potential.

DANC  170 - Walkabout:Expl/Urban Spaces (4)

This class examines how we map urban identities (the city, its neighborhoods, and individuals) through own bodily experiences (moving, seeing, hearing, tasting, feeling). Over the semester, we will use a variety of artistic strategies to ask how the city serves as a canvas, page, or stage for artistry, how it acts as a dynamic character in artistic creation, and how the act of walking itself becomes a creative one. No prior experience necessary.

DANC  180 - Popular Dance Culture and Subcultures (4)

A semester-long entry into and questioning of dance's culture-making function. While we will consider concert dance, this is only one aspect of our greater research into how dance participates in national and international culture, and how various dance practices create subcultures whose values often complicate dominant modes of thought. Through readings, guest lectures, videos, discussions, participation in classes, event attendance, and a final fieldwork-driven project, we will address the notions of culture and subculture, and the imbedded themes of identity, entertainment, aesthetics, criticism, value, and lifestyle. Areas may include: ballroom, tango, capoeira, circus arts, ballet, street dance, music videos, club and drag performance, contact improvisation, Broadway musicals, film and television, and YouTube. No prior dance experience is required.

DANC  181 - Dance and Social History (4)

Dance, like all of the arts, is a product of the culture in which it is created. Social and political climates, cultural values, and issues of personal identity create the framework within which all dance artists create their work. Throughout history, dancers and choreographers have responded to their cultural contexts in more or less conscious ways. Many have used the craft of choreography to give a voice and/or visibility to ideas, issues or populations that directly challenge the attitudes of their communities. This has manifested itself in many ways as dance has evolved as a presence in our culture. This course will use the history of Western concert dance as a means for exploring these connections in greater depth. Particular focus will be paid to the history of ballet, jazz and modern dance and the principle figures of these fields whose work has impacted the ways we think about dance as an agent for activism, artistic innovation and change.

DANC  195 - Dance in San Francisco (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

DANC  210 - Intermediate Ballet (1 - 2)

DANC  211 - Intermediate Modern Dance (1 - 2)

DANC  212 - Jazz/Theatre Dance (Intermediate/Advanced) (1 - 2)

This course is designed to advance and refine the students' jazz theater dance technique, in order for them to experience the great traditions of musical theater. A continuation of the ideas introduced in Beginning Jazz Theater Dance, this class will explore more advanced ways of developing strength, flexibility and stylistic versatility.

DANC  230 - Composition I (4)

Prerequisites: PASJ 130 or DANC 130. Examines the elements of creative movement, with attention to motivation and the use of dance for the expression of ideas and feelings. (Required for Performing Arts Majors.)

DANC  231 - Composition II (4)

Prerequisite: DANCE 230 or PASJ 230. The final Dance Studio, explores choreography, the techniques and tools of composition, space and design, rhythm and pulse, duration and time, energy and dynamics. (Required for Performing Arts Majors.)

DANC  240 - Hip Hop (Int/Adv) (1 - 2)

This 1-2 unit course focuses on Hip-Hop dance as a choreographic form and tool for sequencing movement for improvisation and performance. Various distinct styles and qualities such as popping, locking, gliding, isolations, and overall control will be emphasized. This course will expand on the foundations of Hip-Hop dance techniques at an intermediate to advanced level.

DANC  250 - Philippine Dance and Culture (4)

This course studies the culture, tradition, politics, and development of Philippine dances and rituals through a variety of methods: lecture/discussion, videos, live performance, and movement classes.

DANC  290 - Special Topics (1 - 2)

DANC  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

DANC  302 - Analysis of Dance and Fundamental Skills (4)

Study includes analysis of fundamental skills and dance technique, teaching progression, evaluative techniques, instructional strategies and organizational procedure.

DANC  310 - Ballet (Intermediate - Advanced) (1 - 3)

Continuing development of ballet technique with emphasis on more advanced ballet combinations, port de bras, musicality, and artistry. Course may be repeated for credit.

DANC  311 - Intermediate/Advanced Modern Dance (1 - 3)

Continuing development of modern technique with emphasis on more advanced movement combinations, musicality, and artistry. Appreciation of the history of modern dance. Course may be repeated for credit.

DANC  312 - Jazz/Theatre Dance (Int/Adv) (1 - 3)

Continuing development of jazz/theatre dance technique with emphasis on more advanced rhythms and combinations, various styles, individual expression, and artistry. Appreciation of the origin and evolution of dance. Course may be repeated for credit.

DANC  331 - Performing Arts and Comm Ex (SL) (4)

This course is designed for students who are interested in merging social activism, dance/theater and teaching. Students will learn how to use movement and theater as tools for social change in settings such as senior centers, schools and prisons. In studio sessions, students will identify, approach and construct classes for community sites. Selected films and readings will provide a context for discussion and assist in the development of individual student's research and teaching methods. The class will include lab sessions at designated off-camps sites where students will lead and participate in teaching workshops.

DANC  340 - Balinese Dance and Culture (CD) (4)

Through study of the dances of Bali we examine the arts in contemporary Balinese life, along with the various historical and socio-political forces that have influenced its evolution. Lecture/discussion format, videos, and classes in Balinese music and dance.

DANC  360 - Dance in the Community (4)

This course is designed for students who are interested in arts education, specifically teaching dance to children in school settings. This class meets on-campus twice a week to develop an understanding of the history and theory of children's dance education and the ability to plan and implement dance curriculum. Students will teach off-campus once a week, applying the information from the class session to a practicum experience.

DANC  366 - Music Analysis for Dance (4)

The study of music theory including meter, rhythm, phrasing, melody, harmony and its relationship to dance.

DANC  390 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

DANC  397 - Field Experience in Dance (1 - 4)

Work experience in the field of dance which may include teaching, performance, and management placement.

DANC  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Independent dance-based project overseen by faculty adviser. By permission of instructor.

DANC  456 - Advanced Practice in Production and Performance (3 - 4)

Prerequisite: Written permission of department chair and dean. A faculty-supervised performing arts project which engages the student in practical production.

DANC  480 - Workshop in Dance Production (0 - 4)

This course if fulfilled through participation in the USF Dance Ensemble Fall or Spring concert and/or the USF intergenerational performance company, the Dance Generators. Dancers must audition and attend all rehearsals and performances to receive credit for this course. Students may also receive credit for this course by being involved in the production aspects of these performances.

DANC  490 - Dance and Movement Workshop for California Educators (4)

Designed to promote interest in professional advancement for dance, physical education, and classroom teachers. The workshop provides classes in many dance forms and movement techniques and encourages a sharing of talent, experience, and programs among educators throughout the state of California. Offered intermittently.

DANC  499 - Senior Project in Dance (4)

A faculty-supervised dance project incorporating research and development. Consent of instructor is required.

ECON  101 - Principles of Microeconomics (3)

Introduction to price theory, stressing market structures, distribution, and the organization of economic systems.Offered expecially for students in the McLaren School of Business. Offered Fall and Spring.

ECON  102 - Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

Introduction to aggregate economics, stressing the forces that shape overall economic activity and determine economic growth, employment, interest rates, and inflation. Offered especially for students in the McLaren School of Business. Offered Fall and Spring.

ECON  111 - Principles of Microeconomics (4)

Introduction to price theory, stressing market structures, distribution, and the organization of economic systems. Offered Fall and Spring.

ECON  112 - Principles of Macroeconomics (4)

Introduction to aggregate economics, stressing the forces that shape overall economic activity and determine economic growth, employment, interest rates, and inflation. Offered Fall and Spring.

ECON  120 - Economic Methods (4)

An introduction to the statistical tools and mathematical techniques that economists use to analyze the world. The course leads students through the tools needed for study of economics at an intermediate and advanced level. Offered every Fall.

ECON  220 - Research Method Int Stud (4)

Quantitative and qualitative research skills with applications to international topics. Applied statistical reasoning; establishing causal relationships; introductory regression analysis; experimental methods; interviewing, focus group, and case study techniques; archival and oral history methods; and data sources for international research projects. Prerequisite: MATH 101

ECON  230 - Environmental Economics (4)

Significant changes to the world environment have been brought on by increasing levels of economic industrialization. This course studies both broad trends at the macro level in the quality of air, water, and land resources as well as the underlying causes of these changes at the micro level. Students will learn to apply basic economic theory to better understand phenomena such as the "tragedy of the commons", environmental pollution and resource degradation, and how we can become better stewards of creation.

ECON  280 - The Global Economy (4)

This course offers an introduction to the world economy, international trade, and economic development, designed especially for non-economics majors. Foundations of international markets and trade, comparative advantage, foreign investment, international inequality, and the study of international institutions such as the IMF, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization will form key components of the class.

ECON  283 - Economies of Southeast and East Asia (4)

This course surveys the economic development/economic growth process, political system, and the current economic issues of the East Asian and Southeast Asian countries including China, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines,Thailand, Vietnam, and India. Students will emerge from the course with a solid understanding of Asian culture, society, and economics.

ECON  285 - Econ of Modern Africa (CD) (4)

This course examines the making of economic societies and specifically the evolution of the African (Third World) economies from pre-capitalist traditional societies through the colonial period to the present status of economic dependency. The class will strive to make students conscious of the interaction between Africa and the developed world, and the implications of these interactions, in historical perspective. Offered Fall or Spring as demand warrants.

ECON  286 - Econ of Latin America (CD) (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 111 AND ECON 102 or ECON 112, or permission of the instructor. Economic theory and historical accounts are combined in an attempt to understand the various forces that have shaped economic development in Latin America. The first half of the course looks at historic and macroeconomic issues. We will discuss development policies ranging from the import-substituting industrialization policies of the 1950s-1970s, to the market-oriented reforms of the 1980s through the present. The second half of the course will look at microeconomic issues such as poverty, inequality, agriculture, education, and corruption.

ECON  300 - U.S. Economic History (4)

This course investigates the growth and development of the American economy from colonial times to the present and also examines the most important commentary on contemporary issues of economic and social policy and justice. The curriculum emphasizes America's role as the first frontier economy to industrialize and its role as the only pre-WWI industrial economy with a frontier, as well as the growth of the giant industrial enterprise and wealth-accumulation over the last hundred years. Students read and discuss John Maynard Keynes' General Theory, Milton Friedman's Capitalism and Freedom, Ayn Rand's Capitalism and the Catholic Bishops' Economic Justice for All because most commentary on contemporary issues of economic and social policy and justice derive from these works. No prerequisites.

ECON  306 - Economies of Modern Europe (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 102 ECON 112. European economic, political, and social developments from the Industrial Revolution to modern times. Topics include Europe's key place in the development of the modern world economy, European industrial stagnation between the World Wars, Europe's economic miracle after W.W.II, and the recent movement towards European unification. Offered as demand dictates.

ECON  310 - Foundations of Economic Thought (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 111 or ECON 102 or ECON 112. A course in the history of economic thought, exploring the intellectual foundations of the analysis of economic problems and policies. Offered as demand dictates.

ECON  311 - Intermediate Microeconomics (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 111. Course examines the choices and decisions of consumers and firms in the context of full information, uncertainty, and imperfect information. Offered every Fall.

ECON  311 - Intermediate Microecon Disc (0)

ECON  312 - Intermediate Macroeconomics (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 102 or ECON 112. Analysis of national income determination; function of money and commercial banking; methods and objectives of fiscal policy. Offered every Spring.

ECON  318 - Game Theory (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 111. An introduction to the basic concepts of game theory with emphasis on strategic interaction in the real world. Strategic interaction affects every facet of life; from businesses jockeying for dominance in a marketplace, to politicians vying for re-election, to nations in international conflict. The class studies solution concepts for an array of games from different fields of study. Offered every Spring.

ECON  320 - Econometrics (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 120. This course prepares the student in the use of econometric techniques, such as linear regression, hypothesis testing, and model-building. The focus is on the application of econometrics to applied problems in finance, macroeconomics, development, and international. Offered every Spring.

ECON  350 - Money, Banking, and Financial Institutions (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 111 and ECON 102 or ECON 112. This course investigates the changing role of financial institutions, financial markets, and monetary policy in a modern economy. The focus is on how monetary policy influences macroeconomic variables and financial institutions and markets. Offered every Fall.

ECON  370 - International Economics (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 111 and ECON 102 or ECON 112. Introduction to the theory and policy of international trade and international economic relations. Course also covers areas of migration, international corporations, and investment. Offered every Fall.

ECON  372 - Economic Development (CD) (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 111 and ECON 102 or ECON 112. Processes of economic change and industrialization in developing nations and comparative analysis of underlying social factors; interactions between traditional and modern sectors, and international relationships. Offered every Fall.

ECON  390 - Experimental Courses (1 - 4)

Courses not presently in the catalog which the department offers on an experimental basis.

ECON  398 - Directed Reading (1 - 4)

The written permission of the instructor and the Chair of Economics is required.

ECON  415 - Mathematics for Economists (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 120 or ECON 311. Applications of linear algebra and calculus to equilibrium, dynamic, and optimizing models of economic theory. Offered every Fall.

ECON  416 - Special Topics in Mathematics for Economists (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 415. Topics may include: Applications of differential equations, phase diagrams analysis, stability analysis, optimal control theory, calculus of variations, applications in probability and statistics to financial economics and the economics of uncertainty, differential games, and dynamic programming in economics. Offered as demand merits.

ECON  424 - Internet Data Sources (4)

Understanding how to find and manipulate economic data is an important tool for undergraduate Economics students who are about to enter the job market. Students in this course will learn how to obtain economic and financial data on the Internet for the analysis of a wide variety of economic issues. This course will teach students how to find and utilize data measuring GDP, inflation, and unemployment statistics.

ECON  425 - Econometrics of Fin Markets (4)

This course introduces students to the econometric theory and techniques most useful in examining and testing models common in finance and macro-economics. This includes such topics as forecasting prices and returns of financial instruments, testing hypotheses regarding market efficiency and arbitrage, and modeling the time-series nature of financial market data.

ECON  451 - Monetary Economics (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 120 or ECON 311. This course concentrates on the role played by money in influencing macroeconomic variables such as output, interest rates, and inflation. It also investigates the ways in which government can control economic activity through its regulation of the banking system and the supply of money.

ECON  452 - Model Federal Reserve (2)

This course is designed in conjunction with the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and San Francisco State University. Students will study closely on the functions and structure of the Federal Reserve System and its policy making.

ECON  455 - Options and Futures (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 120 and ECON 350. Options, futures and other derivative contracts are widely used to manage risk by businesses and financial institutions. This course provides students with a solid understanding of: i) the economic functions of futures, forwards and options; ii) the operation of futures and options markets; iii) the pricing of futures, options and other derivatives; and iv) basic strategies in trading options. Offered every Spring.

ECON  460 - Industrial Organization (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 311. Survey of market structure, conduct, and performance of industry and the economics of regulation and anti-trust laws. Offered as demand merits.

ECON  463 - Experimental Economics (4)

This course introduces modern laboratory experimental methods to students with well-developed interests in economics and with an intermediate-level knowledge of microeconomics and statistics. The course will examine experimental techniques in detail and will survey recent applications in fields such as markets, development, choice under certainty and games. Students will use the lessons to conduct original research and set up their own experiment. Prerequisite: ECON 311 Intermediate Microeconomics OR permission of the instructor.

ECON  465 - Law and Economics (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 311. Law and Economics offers undergraduates an understanding of how economic theory provides a framework to analyze legal systems. It will also teach students the fundamental importance of the law in fostering economic growth and development. The economic foundations of both domestic and international institutions will be studied extensively.

ECON  471 - International Finance (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 312. The world monetary system, international monetary policy, foreign exchange markets and their uses in the fields of international investments and finance. Offered every Spring.

ECON  473 - Development Microeconomics (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 311. Study of microeconomic behavior in developing countries, especially focusing on development traps, causes and consequences of poverty, economics of corruption, credit and labor issues, and women in development. Offered every Spring.

ECON  474 - Developmental Macroeconomics (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 312. How can countries achieve sustained growth and significantly reduce poverty? This course examines the central question of long-term growth and growth management policies. It uses an integrated approach combining theoretical material with hands-on real world data-based econometric case studies. Offered every Fall.

ECON  475 - Finance and Investment in Emerging Economies (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 311 and ECON 312. This course is intended for advanced undergraduates who have completed intermediate levels of micro and macroeconomics. The class will analyze the economics of foreign investment in emerging economies such as the newly industrializing economies of Asia and Latin America. Emphasis will be placed on understanding transnational capital flows, foreign direct investment, privatization of industry, the role of exchange rate and currency risk, and models of foreign portfolio investment.

ECON  476 - Natural Resource Economics and Development Policy (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 311. Natural resources and the environment and their role in economic development are hotly debated issues. For some countries the abundance of natural resources has been a curse, for others it has been a boon. This course will examine the issues surrounding changes in the environment in developing nations during the process of industrialization, trade-offs between economic growth and resource depletion, and sustainable development.

ECON  477 - International Political Economy (4)

Prerequisite: ECON 312. Study of the economic, political and technological forces that have shaped the post-war international economic system. Topics include the role of multilateral financial institutions, economic regionalism, the North-South gap, relationships beteen states and markets, economic globalization and its implications, and challenges to sustainable development.

ECON  478 - Population and Labor Economics (4)

The uses of economic analysis to understand the problems of population growth and population policy, household formation, immigration, labor market discrimination, and income inequality and poverty.

ECON  479 - Advanced Topics in International Economics (4)

This course focuses on current international economic policy issues, including the on-going global financial crisis, the challenges and opportunities of globalization for developing as well as developed countries, the stress in the current international monetary and trade systems resulting from the rapid development of India and China and the external adjustment problems of the United States, and the evolving role of the IMF.

ENGL  192 - Intro to Literary Study (4)

An introduction to literary study, focusing on poetry, drama and fiction. Students will learn basic literary terms and practice textual analysis through writing and discussion. Emphasis will be on the formal features of literary works, as well as on the cultural and historical contexts that inform them. English majors only. Offered every semester.

ENGL  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ENGL  198 - Ignatian Literary Magazine (1 - 4)

Laboratory course in magazine editing and production that uses the Ignatian literary magazine as its' vehicle. Offered every year.

ENGL  202 - Great Works of Western Literature (4)

This course is an exploration of literature from the Western tradition. It will help in the development of critical and analytical thinking and writing skills as students peruse the authors of classical or timeless works.

ENGL  203 - African American Literature Survey I (4)

The purpose of this course is to explore the major developments, themes, and works of African American literature from its eighteenth century beginnings to the dawning of the twentieth century. Beginning with an exploration of early eighteenth century African American song, sermon, speech and poetry, the course moves forward through the nineteenth century abolitionist and women's movement to the period of Reconstruction, featuring both major and minor writers.

ENGL  204 - African American Literature Survey II (4)

This course is the second half of the introductory survey of the literature of African Americans. Starting in 1915 at the beginning of the Harlem Renaissance, the course moves forward through the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s to the Women's Movement of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, featuring both major and minor writers.

ENGL  205 - Native American Literature and Film (4)

An introduction to American Indian experiences and cultures from the perspective of oral, written, and visual texts produced by Native North American Indians. The course will focus on various texts representative of emerging Native American literary and cinematic traditions beginning with early oral and ethnographic texts, culminating with a concentration on contemporary American Indian prose, poetry, and film.

ENGL  206 - Tales and Transformations (4)

Stories of transformation and metamorphosis have captivated cultures and writers for centuries. In this course, students read, think about and interpret both kinds of transformations: the changes that happen in stories, and the literary changes that happen to stories. Through reading and discussion, students practice written literary analysis and acquire familiarity with such literary matters as plot and character development, connotative and figural language, and the basic elements of poetry.

ENGL  207 - Major American Novelists (4)

Introductory survey of some landmark fiction written in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Likely authors include Hawthorne, Twain, Chopin, Wharton, Faulkner and Fitzgerald. The course will explore and analyze the development and the continuities and discontinuities of the American novel.

ENGL  208 - Survey of Women's Literature I (4)

This course studies the traditions of literature by women to the early nineteenth century. Through readings of poems, short fiction, novels, and non-fiction prose, the courses explores how women from diverse ethnic, racial, religious, and class background articulated the female experience. Special attention is paid to women's understanding and representation of creative authority as well as to the historical, cultural, and literary contexts in which writing by women is produced.

ENGL  209 - Survey of Women's Literature II (4)

This course examines a diverse body of works from the 19th and 20th centuries. We will read novels, poetry, plays, short stories, and essays with a particular focus on how women writers break and restructure traditional genre forms.

ENGL  210 - Shakespeare: An Introduction (4)

This class studies seven of Shakespeare's plays, the Early Modern period, and Shakespeare's relationship to this period. The course examines the literary, historical, social and cultural influences on Shakespeare's plays along with the moral judgments Shakespeare leads his readers to formulate on disparate topics.

ENGL  211 - Asian American Literature Survey (4)

This course introduces students to Asian American experiences through writings and films by Asians in America (including Chinese, Filipino/a, Japanese, Korean, Southeast Asian, South Asian, and Pacific Islanders--both immigrants and U.S.-born), from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Students analyze the evolution of Asian American consciousness expressed through their writings, raising historical and political issues such as acculturation processes, intergroup relations, media representation, race, culture, gender, sexuality, identity and Third World politics.

ENGL  212 - Introduction to Chicano/a Literature Survey (4)

This course introduces Chicano/a and Latino/a literary and cultural production in its various genres, including poetry, novels, short stories, plays, essay writing, performance and film.

ENGL  215 - Contemporary American Poetry (4)

An introduction to American poetry written after 1945, this class looks at major figures and movements that have shaped not just American literature but American culture. This class looks at poetry as an extension of historical and cultural contexts while also paying attention to the history and the craft of poetry. Authors include Charles Wright, Billy Collins, Allen Ginsburg, Jorie Graham, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, Terrance Hayes, W. S. Merwin, Susan Howe and many others.

ENGL  220 - Creative Writing for Non-English Majors (4)

In Creative Writing, students will be required to read and respond to (in writing and discussion) various short stories and poems, by both published and student writers, and to produce a portfolio of new and original fiction and poetry, including some revision.

ENGL  230 - Literature, Gender and Sexualities (4)

Through an exploration of ways that authors have written about gender and sexualities and have gendered and sexualized their writing, students will learn that gender and sexuality operate as analytic categories which inform not only the representation of characters and behaviors, but also textuality itself: the construction of plots, the mobility of syntax, tropes, and schemas, and the designs of language on the reader.

ENGL  235 - Literature and the Environment (4)

A survey of poetry, fiction and nonfiction across centuries and cultures. We will examine the philosophies that underpin ideas of nature, culture and ¿the wild¿; and examine the nature and place of creative literature in addressing environmental issues.

ENGL  250 - Intro to Creative Writing (4)

An introduction to the Writing Emphasis, this course explores the art of writing poetry and short fiction. Students will be required to read and respond to various assigned writings in order to further develop their critical skills; to become familiar with a diverse selection of writing styles, techniques, and forms; and to prepare for the student workshop. At the end of the semester, each student will hand in a portfolio of original and revised writings. Offered every semester.

ENGL  290 - Survey of British Literature and Methods (4)

Intensive reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama in the British tradition from the medieval period to the present. Introduction to the great themes and movements in British literary history; acquisition of a basic vocabulary for literary analysis in the context of practical criticism. Offered every semester.

ENGL  291 - Survey of American Literature and Methods (4)

Intensive reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama in the American tradition from the colonial period to the present. Introduction to the great themes and movements in American literary history; acquisition of a basic vocabulary for literary analysis in the context of practical criticism. Offered every semester.

ENGL  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ENGL  299 - Critical Analysis (4)

This course builds on the analytical and critical skills developed in English 190 and 191 through examination of the major methodologies of Twentieth Century literary theories. Offered every Fall.

ENGL  310 - Literature Period Courses: 1100-1700 (4)

Reading and discussion of major literary works from the Medieval period through the Renaissance, including those in the popular tradition. Topic changes regularly. Offered every semester.

ENGL  311 - Writing Faith: Exploring Poetics and the Politics of Spirituality in Medieval Literature (4)

This course will explore the social, spiritual, and aesthetic elements in Medieval writings that speak to the intellectual, moral, and spiritual responses of individual faith and society at large. Our readings will allow us to discuss how Medieval writers, especially women writers, express spirituality, hope, compassion, self-sacrifice, and justice. We will examine the elements of spirituality in the following general themes: mysticism, history, gender, and literary conventions. The course will end with explorations into the ways writers and filmmakers represent and appropriate Medieval faith in our contemporary world.

ENGL  320 - Literature Period Courses: 1700-1900 (4)

Reading and discussion of major literary works of the eighteenth and nineteenth century, including those in the popular tradition. Topic changes regularly. Offered every semester.

ENGL  321 - History of the English Language (4)

This class provides both linguistic and literary approaches to the history and development of the English language. By examining fragments and excerpts from literature of each phase in the development of English, students will become aware of language change and the interrelationship between English and other languages. In addition, students will develop an understanding of the relationship of language to literature, including the influence of culture and history on both. This is a Writing Intensive course and fulfills the Core A2 requirement for qualified transfer students.

ENGL  325 - "Writing for a Real World" Editing and Production Workshop (2 - 4)

Using USF's undergraduate journal Writing for a Real World as its vehicle, this course emphasizes the essential skills of copy editing (i.e., mastery of grammar, style, citation, querying, and developing strong habits of verifying information). Working with real deadlines, students will learn layout and production essentials (InDesign basics will be emphasized).

ENGL  330 - Literature Period Courses: 1900-Present (4)

Reading and discussion of major literary works of the twentieth century, including those in the popular tradition. Topic changes regularly. Offered every semester.

ENGL  335 - Feminist Thought (4)

An introduction to a variety of feminist theories and approaches with emphasis on the arts, philosophy, politics, and media. Offered every Spring.

ENGL  340 - Shakespeare (4)

Examination of principal plays in the light of recent and contemporary criticism. Offered every semester.

ENGL  350 - Rhetoric and Culture (4)

An examination of the craft of writing as an artistic activity that links writers and readers with social issues and civic goals. Focusing on the confluence of rhetoric and semiotics, this class examines traditional notions of rhetoric and persuasion within a contemporary context. An advanced writing course, students research and write on issues of social and personal import in which they offer arguments into topics such as gender, law, race, environmental issues, popular culture, and other aspects of contemporary culture. Offered every Fall.

ENGL  360 - Intro to Writing Non-Fiction (4)

An in-depth study of literary prose from the dual perspectives of writer and critic. Students write essays, fiction, and literary criticism and analyze each of these forms in traditional classroom and workshop settings. The class looks at issues of prose from the inside out, focusing on issues of style, structure, usage, and revision. Typical writing assignments include fairy tales, short stories, personal essays, new journalism and cultural criticism. Students also work as editors, pouring over their own and others' manuscript with an eye on style and revision.

ENGL  361 - Intro to Writing Fiction (4)

What makes literary fiction "fiction"? What makes it "literary"? Why do we read and write it? What are our expectations of it? In this course, we will focus on an exploration of the various technical, stylistic, aesthetic, ethical, and formal aspects of literary short fiction, novellas, and novels. Students wil read a diverse range of short and long fiction, which may include writings by Woolf, Duras, Doctorow, Wideman, Chekhov, Wharton, and Carver, and will respond to the writings both critically and creatively.

ENGL  362 - Intro to Writing Poetry (4)

An introduction to Poetry as a Genre. Students will be required to read classic examples of narrative, dramatic and lyric poetry, as well as poems from the Romantic period to present day. This course examines the development of poetry and explores issues of rhetorical structures, closed and open forms, prosody, diction and audience. requirements will include writing assignments of both the creative and analytical varieties, as well as exams.

ENGL  363 - Intro to Writing Drama (4)

A history of the development of Drama as a Genre, from antiquity to present day. Students will be required to read examples from a range of dramatic periods and styles, which might include Greek Tragedy, Elizabethan Comedy, French Farce, Restoration Comedy, Realistic Dramas, Social Dramas, Absurdist Theatre and Experimental Theatre. Requirements will include writing assignments of both the creative and analytical varieties, as well as exams.

ENGL  364 - Intro to Writing Oral History (4)

In this service-learning course, students will discuss and grapple with the issues and responsibilities of collecting and creating oral histories, nonfiction narratives and profiles. Proceeding from the premise that ordinary people have within them extraordinary stories, students will study the craft of the interview and the oral history, and discuss inherent issues of documentation, exploitation, confidentiality, authorship and more. In class, students will read published examples of oral histories, practice interview techniques and discuss supplementary research methods as they collect, transcribe, edit and revise “untold stories” in a variety of forms. This class is also a designated Service Learning (SL) class. Each student will dedicate a minimum of 25 hours during the semester to service.

ENGL  370 - Ethics, Writing and Culture (4)

This course focuses on the political and social questions surrounding writing and publishing. Students study issues of censorship, racism, sexism, and social responsibility both within the publishing world and recent literatures. The course looks at how novels, poems, essays, and columns have altered and influenced contemporary culture, exploring the responsibility of the writer to his or her audience.

ENGL  390 - Critical Analysis (4)

This course builds on the analytical and critical skills developed in English 190 and 191 through examination of the major methodologies of Twentieth Century literary theories. Offered every Fall.

ENGL  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Offered every semester.

ENGL  399 - Critical Analysis (4)

This course builds on the analytical and critical skills developed in English 190 and 191 through examination of the major methodologies of Twentieth Century literary theories. Offered every Fall.

ENGL  400 - Special Topics in Writing (4)

Advanced seminar in writing that requires students to produce writing suitable for publication. A close attention will be paid to issues of style, rhetorical strategies and audience. Recent topics include Writing and Popular Culture, Gender and Sexuality and Writing and Social Change. Course may be taken more than once with a different topic.

ENGL  405 - Capstone Seminar; Asian American Studies (4)

As the culmination of the certificate program in Asian American studies, this course requires students to integrate the content and models of core and elective courses into a coherent grid of analysis and agenda for social action. A primary component of this course will be service-learning activities in collaboration with local and regional Asian Pacific American community agencies. Students will be required to submit a capstone portfolio, including a thesis paper, at the end of the semester that integrates their service-learning experiences with their academic foundation. Offered Spring 2003.

ENGL  410 - Special Topics in Literature and Film (4)

A varying series of topics examined by means of critical theory and research methods. Offered every year.

ENGL  450 - (4)

A workshop designed to give students a stronger understanding of fiction writing and revision processes. Exit requirement is a portfolio of new, original, and revised work. Non-majors welcome with the permission of the instructor.

ENGL  460 - Advanced Workshop in Creative Writing: Poetry (4)

A workshop designed to give students a stronger understanding of poetry writing and revision processes. Exit requirement is a portfolio of new, original, and revised work.

ENGL  470 - Advanced Workshop in Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4)

A workshop designed to give students a stronger understanding of nonfiction writing and revision processes. Exit requirement is a portfolio of new, original, and revised work. Offered once every three semesters.

ENGL  480 - Internships in Writing (SL) (1 - 4)

Internships introduce and acclimate students to professional opportunities in writing. May be directed toward professional work or service. Offered every Spring. Prerequisite: ENGL 192

ENGL  490 - Senior Seminar in Literature (4)

A course which integrates the knowledge and skills derived from previous work in a significant research project. Work is submitted to both the instructor and an outside reader. Offered every Spring.

ENGL  491 - Senior Seminar in Writing (4)

A course which integrates the knowledge and skills derived from previous work in a significant creative writing portfolio or research project. Work is submitted to both the instructor of record and an outside reader. Offered every Spring.

ENVA  109 - (4)

This course introduces students to environmental studies by focusing on social science approaches to understanding the human causes of environmental change. Sociological, psychological, anthropological, historical, economic, political, and moral perspectives are examined. The concept of the "tragedy of the commons" is used to highlight the social factors underlying environmental problems. Offered every spring.

ENVA  110 - Understanding Our Environment w/Lab (4)

This course serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental science and environmental studies. For all cases, the resulting environmental impacts are studied in detail. Specifically, this course examines the risks associated with growth in a developing world; environmental impact of population growth on natural resources; mineral and resource extraction; water resource uses; and renewable and non-renewable sources for power generation. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using laboratory exercises, environmental surveys, and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Cross-listed With: ENVS 110.

ENVA  110 - Laboratory (0)

ENVA  130 - (4)

This is an introductory course to the art, science and practical implementation of community gardening techniques. Students study local community-supported agriculture programs, analyze different models for urban garden projects, and develop and hold community garden design meetings. Based on research, field trips, first-hand study of the university garden site and hosting of university-wide meetings, students will produce a draft proposal for the university garden by the end of the semester.

ENVA  140 - (4)

This is the second semester of a year-long introductory course on the art, science and practical implementation of community garden design and techniques. In the first term students studied local community supported agriculture programs, analyzed different models for urban garden projects, and organized and held community garden design meetings. Based on research, field trips, first hand study of the university garden site and the hosting of university-wide meetings, students produced a draft proposal for the university garden at the end of the semester. In the spring semester students will implement the Community Garden design while simultaneously engaging in Service-Learning with non-profit organizations working on food security issues.

ENVA  145 - Comm Garden Outreach (SL) (4)

Students explore food security issues through semester-long Service Learning internships with organizations involved in the production, use, distribution and/or promotion of locally grown organic produce. Students engage in on-going reflection on their Service Learning internship experience.

ENVA  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ENVA  200 - CADD 1 (4)

CADD 1 is an introductory course in Computer Aided Design and Drawing in VectorWorks, a CADD program for both the Mac and PC platforms that integrates 2D, 3D, and hybrid objects in the same drawing. The class will cover both line drawing and 3D modeling techniques.

ENVA  210 - Ecology and Human Impacts w/Lab (4)

This course introduces students to biological and ecological aspects of environmental science. It will include lectures, laboratory exercises and field exercises. The goal of the course is to give the student an overview of basic ecology, ecological management issues, and ecosystem policy with special emphasis on local issues in the San Francisco Bay Area. Cross-listed with ENVS 210.

ENVA  210 - Laboratory (0)

ENVA  212 - Air and Water w/Lab (4)

This course covers broad physical and chemical aspects of the atmosphere and water resources. Specifically, this course considers atmospheric composition, weather processes, and air pollution; water resources, regulations, and defining water quality based on intended use. For all cases, the resulting environmental impacts are studied in detail. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using field trips and sampling exercises, laboratory exercises, environmental surveys, and class discussion to reinforce scientific principles. Cross-listed with ENVS 212.

ENVA  212 - Laboratory (0)

ENVA  220 - Intro to Urban Agriculture (4)

Introduction to global, national, and local urban agriculture.

ENVA  230 - Introduction to Urban Sociology (4)

An introduction to the historical development and social structure of cities; their changing historical importance in the growth of social, economic, and political life; and their crucial role in the political economy of a global society. Offered in Fall. Cross Listed With: SOC 230.

ENVA  231 - Introduction to Globalization (4)

Globalization has become a buzzword in our society. But what is globalization? In this class we will examine what it is, how it shapes our lives and where it happens by looking at both the theory and reality of globalization.

ENVA  232 - Environmental Economics (4)

Significant changes to the world environment have been brought on by increasing levels of economic industrialization. This course studies both broad trends at the macro level in the quality of air, water, and land resources as well as the underlying causes of these changes at the micro level. Students will learn to apply basic economic theory to better understand phenomena such as the "tragedy of the commons", environmental pollution and resource degradation, and how we can become better stewards of creation.

ENVA  235 - Literature and the Environment (4)

A survey of poetry, fiction and nonfiction across centuries and cultures. We will examine the philosophies that underpin ideas of nature, culture and ¿the wild¿; and examine the nature and place of creative literature in addressing environmental issues.

ENVA  240 - Ethics: Environmental Issues (4)

This course critically analyzes ethical arguments and various positions on contemporary ethical issues. The course will be composed of three focus areas: Ethical Theory, Social Issues, and Ethics of Everyday life. Approximately one-third of the course will be devoted to each area. This section focuses on the more specific ethical issue, Environmental Issues.

ENVA  250 - Environmental Data Analysis (4)

This course provides students with two types of mathematical tools for environmental problem solving; estimating tools and statistical tools. Students will learn how to characterize environmental problems with mathematical relationships, find necessary data and make assumptions, and estimate quantitative answers. We will use statistical tools to gather meaning from environmental data, by examining data patterns (distributions), determining relationships among data (correlations), and checking data quality. The course will address such problems as water contamination, toxic waste, noise pollution, air emissions, and climate change. Cross-listed With: ENVS 250.

ENVA  255 - Quant Skills for Env Studies (4)

This course introduces students to two types of mathematical tools for environmental problem solving: estimating tools and statistical data analysis tools. Students will learn how to characterize environmental problems with simple mathematical models, find necessary data and make assumptions, and estimate quantitative answers. Fundamental statistical tools such as significance testing, correlation, and regression analysis are employed to understand the relationships between social variables like income and population and environmental variables such as air quality, water quality, and CO2 emissions.

ENVA  280 - Alaska: Culture, Environment and Tourism (4)

This 17-day, 4-credit Arrupe Justice immersion course in anthropology and environmental studies examines the relationship between culture and the environment in the unique island setting of Sitka, Alaska. Students will learn about the region’s terrestrial and marine environments, its occupation and use by the indigenous Tlingit population and by non-Native peoples, and contemporary controversies surrounding the appropriate use of its natural resources – its fish, timber, and natural beauty. The focus will be on experiential learning, beginning with a 3-day trip up the Inland Passage abroad an Alaska Marine Highway ship. All students are welcome to apply; especially suited for Anthropology and Environmental Studies students.

ENVA  285 - Nature Immersion (2)

Who are you? What is nature? What is your relationship to nature? What are your connections, human or otherwise? This course will explore these questions through a combination of traditional seminar-style discussions and nature outings (e.g., hikes and overnight camping).

ENVA  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ENVA  300 - CADD 2 (2)

This course will develop an understanding of digital tools and strategies, which engage and expand the design process, with the primary goal of utilizing the computer as a fluid, critical investigative tool. We will examine the impact of digital strategies, methodologies and practices on the work of contemporary architects, with individual research into modes of representation and its impact on tectonic development.

ENVA  301 - Buck Mountain Experimental Station (4)

Students live and learn at BMES, a 22-acre off-the-grid homestead, while undertaking hands-on fieldwork focused on permaculture design principles.

ENVA  304 - Sustainable Systems Design Seminar (4)

Sustainable Design Seminar will examine theories and practices that encourage the development of ecological consciousness as applied to design practice and production. This course will ask students to think critically about what sustainability actually means, and to examine the complexities in our choices of materials, processes, locations, quantities, production and consumption.

ENVA  308 - Research Methods (4)

This course stresses the comprehension and assessment of research methods in sociology. Students critically consider the logic and variety of methods that sociologists use to observe the social world by examining the most common qualitative and quantitative techniques. The focus is on assessing how well research strategies address the underlying sociological question(s), how the evidence provides tenable knowledge of social phenomena, and how the evidence can be used in developing new theories or testing the adequacy of existing theories. Offered every semester.

ENVA  310 - Commons: Land, Water and Air (4)

This course lays out some of the critical questions involving definitions, histories and mythologies having to do with the concept of “the commons” such as land, water and air. At the center of the course is the intellectual history of the notion of the “commons” and how this affects our general understanding of resources we all hold and share in common. The course engages in a multi-disciplinary inquiry involving fields including economics, politics, history, theology and religious studies, ecology, philosophy, geography, and psychology.

ENVA  311 - Env Sustain Cornerstone Sem (4)

This course encourages students to synthesize theories, perspectives, issues and problems in the interdisciplinary field of environmental studies. Through reflection on their progress through the major thus far, students will articulate their emerging understanding and interests in environmental studies for the purpose of designing a 16-unit "Environmental Studies Pathway" that will be completed during the junior and senior years. Students will also create an e-Portfolio that will serve pedagogical and professional development purposes as it evolves to represent all of the knowledge and skills acquired in the major.

ENVA  319 - Health and Environment (4)

This course explores illness due to environmental pollution. An overview of sociological perspectives on health and illness is followed by examination of the role of scientific knowledge and other social factors in identifying, treating, and preventing environmental illness. Cross-listed with SOC 319.

ENVA  320 - Global Environments and Societies (4)

This course explores how characteristics of human societies influence human uses of, and our relationship to, the environment. Topics include: the roles of science and technology, government, the economy, and culture in shaping human impacts on the environment; the environmental movement; and environmental justice. Cross-listed with SOC 320.

ENVA  322 - Globalization and Resistance (4)

This course examines social, economic, political and cultural dimensions of globalization from a sociological perspective. Theoretical approaches to the globalization thesis, neo-liberalism, and the decline of the nation-state are analyzed along with case studies of transnational movements of resistance that include workers, students, women, indigenous peoples, and environmentalists. Offered intermittently.

ENVA  342 - Environmental History of Africa (4)

Introduction to the environmental history of Africa from 1800 to the present. Topics examined include Africa's physical environment, role of natural resources in the development of African societies, demography, agriculture, desertification, deforestation, conservation, famine, and economic development. Offered every other Spring. Cross-listed with HIST 342.

ENVA  344 - Environmental Communication (4)

This course explores conceptual frameworks for understanding the relationship between communication, culture, and the environment. Students will critically analyze discourse about the environment from a number of contexts (social movement rhetoric, mass and social media, public deliberation, and popular culture) and also develop applied environmental communication skills.

ENVA  350 - Energy and Environment (4)

Prerequisites: ENVA 212 and ENVA 250. In this course, students will examine energy production and consumption as an underlying cause of multiple environmental problems. Beginning with an overview of energy-environment connections, the course will cover major fuel types and energy sources--from coal and natural gas to solar, and advanced energy carriers and storage systems (e.g., hydrogen and fuel cells).

ENVA  355 - Methods in Environ Studies (4)

This course focuses on the analytical and research skills employed by academics and professionals working in environmental fields. Emphasis is placed on critical reading of research as well as formulation, practice, and communication of research that examines the human-environment relationship. Skills span the full range of social science and humanities fields, including use of statistics, survey and interview techniques, field research/participant observation, historical methods, media and content analysis, and qualitative data analysis. Lectures, individual and small-group assignments, and course project.

ENVA  360 - International Environmental Politics (4)

Study of the politics of ethnicity and nationalism in the contemporary world and ramifications for state sovereignty, international cooperation and security. Case studies from a wide variety of settings (i.e., South-Southeast Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Canada, Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, Yugoslavis) will be used to illustrate conceptual and empirical issues. Offered every other year. Cross-listed with POLS 360.

ENVA  361 - Religion and the Environment (4)

Explores the religious underpinnings of contemporary attitudes and practices concerning the environment. Both historical and contemporary understandings of nature as expressed in various religious traditions. Offered intermittently.

ENVA  363 - Environmental Law (4)

Environmental Law examines the basic legal setting for the protection and management of the environment. It discusses how environmental law is created and applied. This course reviews how the common law traditionally addressed environmental issues before entering the new era of federal environmental regulation. Major statutes covered include the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, Superfund (CERCLA), and the Endangered Species Act. During the course we will discuss how many of the areas studied may play a role in the current efforts to address climate change. We will finally address formal legal efforts to address climate change on the international level as well as local California initiatives. The course also includes material on economic analysis, scientific and legal causation, and expert testimony.

ENVA  364 - Urbanization and Development (4)

This course examines some of the major factors that contribute to urban development in post-industrial and newly industrializing countries. It will cover issues of de-industrialization, labor and capital mobility, immigration, the logic of spatial location, metropolitanization, and the growth and political economy of global cities. Offered in Spring.

ENVA  365 - Brazilian Culture and Society (4)

This course provides socio-historical approaches to contemporary Brazilian culture and society from a race, class, and gender/sexuality perspective. Case-studies of popular/political cultures, social movements, inequalities and identities illustrate major developments in Brazilian culture and society within the context of democratization and globalization. Offered intermittently.

ENVA  366 - Intro to Environmental Policy (4)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the processes, participants, and institutions that surround the making and implementing of environmental policy. It combines lectures, case studies, and some "hands on" field exercises to illustrate how these elements interact. Cross Listed With: ENVA - 366.

ENVA  367 - Environmental Justice (4)

This course examines how environmental ¿goods¿¿like clean air and water¿and environmental ¿bads¿¿like hazardous waste and industrial pollution¿come to be unequally distributed in societies, often along lines of race, class, and gender.

ENVA  385 - USF Wild.Immer:SierrasToTheSea (4)

This course immerses students in two wildernesses over 21 days: The Sierra Nevada Mountains and Pt. Reyes National Seashore. Students will explore the diversity of ecosystems found while also contemplating the profound questions that wilderness immersion prompts: What is nature? What is the human relationship to nature? Includes 12 days of backpacking in the High Sierras. No prerequisites.

ENVA  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

ENVA  396 - Environmental Studies Internship (4)

Internship in an organization related to Environmental Studies.

ENVA  404 - Environmental Ethics (4)

Provides an overview of ethical responsibilities for the natural world. The course explores the diverse ethical responses to environmental problems including contemporary philosophical and religious beliefs regarding nature. Cross-listed with THRS 404.

ENVA  410 - Environmental Monitoring w/Lab (SL) (4)

Prerequisites: ENVA 210, ENVA 212 and ENVA 250. Capstone field and laboratory methodologies class that draws upon materials presented in the foundation courses.

ENVA  410 - Laboratory (0)

ENVA  441 - UG History Seminar (4)

Topics will be announced before the seminars are offered, and range from Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the early Modern period, to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Offered once per year.

ENVA  450 - Capstone Practicum in Environmental Studies (4)

An upper division seminar that serves as a capstone to the program. Students explore diverse environmental issues from the perspectives of the humanities as well as the natural and social sciences. The student's environmental portfolio is reviewed during this seminar.

ENVA  498 - Research for Advanced Undergraduates (1 - 4)

Original research supervised by a member of the staff, with credit to be fixed in each case. Designed to give students an acquaintance with, and an appreciation of, the principles and methods of original scientific investigation. A research report must be filed.

ENVS  100 - Understanding our Environment w/lab (4)

This course is an introduction to environmental science and environmental studies for non-science majors. It examines the environmental impact of population growth on natural resources; mineral and resource extraction; water resource use and water pollution; air pollution and climate change; and conventional and sustainable energy supplies. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using class discussions, laboratory exercises, and environmental surveys to reinforce scientific principles. Offered every semester.

ENVS  100 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  110 - Introduction to Environmental Science w/Lab (4)

This course serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental science and environmental studies. For all cases, the resulting environmental impacts are studied in detail. Specifically, this course examines the risks associated with growth in a developing world; environmental impact of population growth on natural resources; mineral and resource extraction; water resource uses; and renewable and non-renewable sources for power generation. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using laboratory exercises, environmental surveys, and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles.

ENVS  110 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  195 - FYS: First Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ENVS  195 - FYS: First Year Seminar (0)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ENVS  210 - Ecology and Human Impacts w/Lab (4)

Prerequisite: ENVS 100 or ENVS 110. This course introduces students to biological and ecological aspects of environmental science. The course will include lectures, laboratory, and field exercises that emphasize basic ecology principles. The goal of the course is to give the student an overview of basic ecology, ecological management issues, and ecosystem policy with special emphasis on local issues in the San Francisco Bay Area. Cross-listed With: ENVA 210.

ENVS  210 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  212 - Air and Water w/Lab (4)

Prerequisite: ENVS 100 or ENVS 110 and MATH 108. This course covers broad physical and chemical aspects of the atmosphere and water resources. Specifically, this course considers atmospheric composition, weather processes, and air pollution; water resources, regulations, and defining water quality based on intended use. For all cases, the resulting environmental impacts are studied in detail. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using field trips and sampling exercises, laboratory exercises, environmental surveys, and class discussion to reinforce scientific principles. Cross-listed With: ENVA 212.

ENVS  212 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  230 - Environmental Impacts and Economic Decision-Making (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 111 or ENVS 110 or ENVA 110. Is there a conflict between the profit motive and the health of the environment? Focusing on real-world problems through case studies, students explore the link between environmental issues and economic decisions.

ENVS  250 - Environmental Data Analysis (4)

Prerequisite: ENVS 100 or ENVS 110 and MATH 108. Provides students with foundations in quantitative analysis methods used to analyze environmental data. These methods are applied to real-world cases, and students will conduct a full analysis and prepare a professional report as part of a group process. Cross-listed With: ENVA 250.

ENVS  311 - Environmental Chemistry (4)

Prerequisites: CHEM 113 with a grade of C- (1.7) or higher, and one of the following: ENVS 212, CHEM 230, or CHEM 236. This course provides in-depth coverage of major topics in the chemistry of the environment, including tropospheric air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, aquatic chemistry, water pollution and water treatment, soil chemistry, and toxic organic compounds. Offered intermittently. Cross-listed with: CHEM 311.

ENVS  312 - H2O Resource Analy w/Lab (4)

This course explores two primary aspects of water resource availability: surface water hydrology and water quality. Process analyses of environmental problems are used throughout this course to aid in the development of scientific knowledge and environmental impacts on water. Prerequisite: ENVS 212

ENVS  312 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  320 - Restoration Ecol w/Lab (4)

Prerequisite: ENVS 210. An overview of concepts and practices in restoration ecology. Emphasis will be on the application of ecological principles to restoration design, implementation, and monitoring. Two lectures and one laboratory session each week.

ENVS  320 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  321 - Wetland Ecology w/Lab (4)

Prerequisite: ENVS 210 or permission of instructor. This upper-division lecture and laboratory course reviews basic concepts of ecology as they apply to wetland ecosystems. Major course topics include: wetland hydrology and soils, wetland biota and their adaptations, wetland types, and policies for wetland management.

ENVS  321 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  330 - Envir and Ecosystem Health (4)

This course explores how poisons in the environment impact both people and ecosystems. Topics include environmental estrogens and the feminization of amphibians, heavy metal toxicity, pesticide use, and the spread of diseases. Prerequisite: CHEM 113.

ENVS  331 - Environmental Health -- A Toxicological Perspective (4)

Prerequisites: CHEM 111 CHEM 113 Recommended: CHEM 236 . Environmental health is concerned with effects the environment can have on the general health and well being of humans. Environmental toxicology investigates the impacts pollutants have on the structure and function of ecosystems. Major topics will include toxicological aspects of water and air pollution, biological contaminants, heavy metals, and pesticides and other toxins as they relate to environmental health.

ENVS  335 - Marine Environments (4)

This elective introduces the biological, chemical, and physical processes that shape marine environments. It explores how these processes are impacted by anthropogenic activities, such as overfishing, eutrophication, ocean acidification, climate change, and pollution. Prerequisite: ENVS 212 with C or higher.

ENVS  350 - Energy and Environment (4)

Prerequisites: ENVS 212 and ENVS 250. In this course, students will examine energy production and consumption as an underlying cause of multiple environmental problems. Beginning with an overview of energy-environment connections, the course will cover major fuel types and energy sources--from coal and natural gas to solar, and advanced energy carriers and storage systems (e.g., hydrogen and fuel cells).

ENVS  360 - Climate Change: Science and Policy (4)

Prerequisites: ENVS 210 ENVS 212 and ENVS 250. In this course, students will develop a deeper understanding of the greenhouse effect and human influences on the Earth's climate. Building on this scientific base, the course will emphasize climate change mitigation--options for changing human activities and reducing emissions of greenhouse gases to avert negative climate change impacts.

ENVS  366 - Environmental Policy (4)

Examines the effectiveness and shortcomings of mechanisms in US and California environmental policies from physical, ecological, institutional, and other perspectives. Engages students in policy analysis and exploration of emerging approaches based on a systems view, life-cycle analysis, and collaboration. Upper-division course, ENVS 110 pre-requisite.

ENVS  370 - Introduction to Landscape Ecology and GIS w/lab (4)

Prerequisites: ENVS 100 or ENVS 110 and ENVS 210 and ENVS 250. This course serves as an introduction to environmental remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It is designed to provide students with basic concepts, principles and applications of remote sensing and GIS and their use in natural resource management. This course has a corequisite laboratory.

ENVS  370 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  380 - Environmental Engineering (4)

Environmental Engineering develops engineering problem solving skills. Students apply their skills to real-world issues including pollution migration, wastewater treatment, hazardous waste treatment, and green engineering and pollution prevention. Prerequisite: ENVS 212.

ENVS  390 - Undergraduate Special Topics (1 - 4)

Courses offered occasionally on a special topic in Environmental Science.

ENVS  390 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  410 - Methods of Environmental Monitoring w/Lab (4)

Prerequisites: ENVS 210, ENVS 212 and ENVS 250. Capstone field and laboratory methodologies class that draws upon materials presented in the foundation courses.

ENVS  410 - Laboratory (0)

ENVS  490 - UG Seminar in Env. Science (1)

Topics in Environmental Science. Open to Juniors and Seniors only.

ENVS  498 - Advanced Undergraduate Research (1 - 4)

Original research supervised by a member of the staff, with credit to be fixed in each case. Designed to give students an acquaintance with, and an appreciation of, the principles and methods of original scientific investigation. A research report must be filed. Cross-listed With: ENVA 498

ESL  1 - Academic Oral Comm Skills I (0)

Focus is on active listening and speaking skills that are necessary to function successfully in a university class. Development of listening strategies, note taking techniques, presentation skills and discussion skills are emphasized. Cross-listed with: ESL - 111.

ESL  2 - Academic Reading/Writing I (0)

Focus is on improving students' abilities in reading comprehension and vocabulary skills and on the organization and writing of paragraphs and short essays. Cross-listed with: ESL - 110.

ESL  3 - Grammar I (0)

Focus is on intermediate English grammar structures and functions. Cross-listed with: ESL - 113.

ESL  4 - Special Topics I (0)

Focus on the integration of English language skills in learning and discussing cultural and academic issues.

ESL  7 - Grad Writing/Speaking Pract (0)

Focus on academic writing and speaking skills needed by graduate students. (ESL 601 open to IME students ONLY.) Cross-listed with: ESL - 601 and ESL - 030.

ESL  8 - ESL Writing (0)

Focus is on preparing non-native speakers of English for college level writing by developing accuracy and fluency in written communication.

ESL  11 - Academic Oral Comm Skills II (0)

Focus on active listening skills in academic and non-academic situations. Development of note taking techniques and discussion and writing skills needed when responding to academic lectures. Cross-listed with: ESL - 121.

ESL  12 - Acad Reading/Writing II (0)

Focus is on reading university-level material more rapidly and more efficiently, and on demonstrating comprehension through an articulate oral or written response and on the skills needed for writing academic reports and essays. Cross-listed with: ESL - 120.

ESL  13 - Grammar II (0)

Focus is on advanced English grammar structures and functions. Cross-listed with: ESL - 123.

ESL  14 - Special Topics II (0)

ESL  15 - Seminar Series (0)

Focus on specific aspects of English such as idioms or vocabulary and overall improvement in English language skills. Cross-listed with: ESL - 115.

ESL  16 - TOEFL (0)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 460 and above /ibtTOEFL 48 and above. Focus on test taking and skill areas covered on the TOEFL test: listening, speaking, writing, and reading/vocabulary. Some focus on written structure also. Emphasis is on building test taking and language skills needed to do well on the TOEFL. Cross-listed with ESL - 116.

ESL  17 - Pronouncing American English (0)

Designed for non-native speakers who wish to have more American pronunciation and speech patterns and who wish to gain confidence in using English in academic, professional and social situations. Cross-listed with: ESL - 132.

ESL  30 - Grad Wrtg/Speaking Pract (0)

Focus on academic writing and speaking skills needed by graduate students.

ESL  31 - Integrated Skills (0)

ESL  32 - Oral Communication Skills (0)

ESL  41 - Integrated Skills I (0)

Low intermediate level. Focus is on improving students' basic English skills of grammar, reading, vocabulary, and writing.

ESL  42 - Oral Communication Skills I (0)

Low intermediate level. Focus is on conversational skills, pronunciation, and vocabulary in daily situations.

ESL  51 - Integrated Skills II (0)

Intermediate level. Focus is improving students' basic English skills of grammar, reading, vocabulary, and writing with some discussion.

ESL  52 - Oral Communication Skills II (0)

Intermediate level. Focus is on listening and speaking skills in daily situations. Academic oral skills are also introduced.

ESL  61 - Integrated Skills III (0)

Low advanced level. Focus is on integration of the basic English skills of grammar, reading, vocabulary, and writing.

ESL  62 - Oral Communication Skills III (0)

Low advanced level. Focus is on listening and speaking skills in daily situations and academic settings.

ESL  71 - Integrated Skills IV (0)

High advanced level. Focus is on integration of the basic English skills of grammar, reading, vocabulary, and writing for academic purposes.

ESL  72 - Oral Communication Skills IV (0)

High advanced level. Focus is on listening and speaking skills in daily situations and academic settings.

ESL  73 - Business English (0)

Focus is on integration of listening, speaking, reading, and writing using business content.

ESL  99 - Dir Study - Non Matriculated (0)

ESL  100 - Success at USF:Univ/Class Cult (3)

This Jumpstart course is designed to help USF conditionally-admitted students improve their academic English and build their competence in understanding USF and U.S. university culture in order to be more successful when they begin studies in the U.S. Many adult students of English have had opportunities before coming to the U.S. to study formal features of the English language, but they have not had much chance to use those skills extensively for communicative academic purposes. For this reason, this course is designed to resemble a U.S. university course. In other words, students will be expected to learn the content of the course.

ESL  101 - US Cult:Understand/Neg New Lan (3)

This Jumpstart course is designed to help USF conditionally-admitted students in China improve their academic English and build their competence in understanding aspects of U.S. culture that are relevant for their cultural adjustment to living and studying in the U.S., and USF in particular. The orientation of the course will be to take a social-psychological view of life in society more broadly as the foundation for understanding and negotiating differences between the students' countries and U.S. culture.

ESL  102 - Fluency Development (4)

This course focuses on fluency-building in all the skills for intermediate learners of English. Fluency is the ability to produce and receive a sufficient amount of language with ease that is both intelligible and comprehensible. Attention to fluency supports the ongoing development of accuracy. Students will be placed in this course on the basis of their test scores.

ESL  103 - Pronunciation I (2)

This course is an introduction to American English pronunciation.

ESL  104 - Pronunciation II (2)

This advanced course improves American English pronunciation and includes presentation contexts.

ESL  105 - Vocabulary and Idioms I (2)

This course is an introduction to academic vocabulary and common idioms in the U.S. at the intermediate level.

ESL  106 - Vocabulary and Idioms II (2)

This course focuses on increasing the academic vocabulary and idioms of multilingual students at the advanced level.

ESL  107 - Introductory Academic Reading and Writing (8)

This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in reading comprehension, building spelling and vocabulary skills, and writing well-formed simple and complex sentences and well-organized paragraphs.

ESL  108 - Introductory Academic Oral Communication Skills (4)

Focus is on basic listening and speaking skills that are necessary to function successfully in daily life and in a university class.

ESL  109 - Introductory Grammar (4)

Focus is on reviewing basic grammatical structures and reinforcing correct application of basic grammar forms in writing and speaking.

ESL  110 - Academic Reading/Writing I (8)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 460-497/ibtTOEFL 48-60. Focus is on improving students' abilities in reading comprehension and vocabulary skills and on the organization and writing of paragraphs and short essays. Cross-listed with: ESL - 002.

ESL  111 - Academic Oral Communication I (4)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 460-497/ibt TOEFL 48-60. Focus is on active listening and speaking skills that are necessary to function successfully in daily life and in a university class. Cross-listed with: ESL - 001.

ESL  113 - Grammar I (4)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 460-497/ibtTOEFL 48-60. Focus is on intermediate English grammar structures and functions. Cross-listed with: ESL - 003.

ESL  114 - English Through Computers (4)

Focus on using computers in improving English skills and on learning basic computer skills such as word processing, spread sheets, graphics programs, e-mail, and the world wide web.

ESL  115 - Seminar Series (2)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 460-547/ibtTOEFL 48-80. Focus on specific aspects of English such as idioms or vocabulary and overall improvement in English language skills. Cross-listed with ESL - 015.

ESL  116 - TOEFL (4)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 460-547/ibtTOEFL 48-78. Focus on test taking and skill areas covered on the TOEFL test: listening, speaking, writing, and reading/vocabulary. Some focus on written structure also. Emphasis is on building test taking and language skills needed to do well on the TOEFL. Cross-listed with ESL - 016.

ESL  120 - Academic Reading/Writing II (8)

Focus on reading university-level material rapidly and efficiently, and on demonstrating comprehension through an articulate oral or written response and on the skills needed for writing academic reports and essays. Cross-listed with IEP 012.

ESL  121 - Academic Oral Comm II (4)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 500-574/ibtTOEFL 62-78. Focus on active listening and speaking skills that are needed to function successfully in a university class. Development of listening strategies, note taking techniques, oral production skills and formal presentation skills. Cross-listed with ESL - 011.

ESL  122 - Oral Skills III (4)

Focus on high-level performance of longer speeches in academic and professional settings with emphasis on listening, complex construction, pronunciation, behavioral skills, visual aids, and greater comfort with a variety of audiences. Cross-listed with IEP-020.

ESL  123 - Grammar II (4)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 500-547/ibtTOEFL 62-78. Focus is on advanced English grammar structures and functions. Cross-listed with IEP - 013.

ESL  124 - Academic Reading/Writing III (8)

Focus on reading complex university-level material of various genres more efficiently and rapidly, on responding to readings and academic topics using multiple and appropriate writing and speaking genres, and on advanced academic writing, research and documentation skills. Cross-listed With: IEP 018.

ESL  126 - Grammar III (4)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 500-547/ibtTOEFL 62-78. Focus is on advanced English grammar structures and functions. Cross-listed with IEP-021.

ESL  128 - English for Business (4)

Prerequisite: pbtTOEFL score of 500 or higher, ibtTOEFL score of 61 or higher, or an IELTS of 5.5 or higher. This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in all four basic language skills (reading, listening, writing, speaking) by surveying key areas of business and by providing students opportunities to understand and express key concepts in business. Cross-listed with IEP-021.

ESL  132 - Pronouncing American English (2)

Designed for non-native speakers who wish to have more American pronunciation and speech patterns and who wish to gain confidence in using English in academic, professional and social situations. Cross-listed with ESL - 017.

ESL  135 - ESL Writing (4)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 550-587/ibtTOEFL 79-95. Focus is on preparing non-native speakers of English for college level writing by developing accuracy and fluency in written communication.

ESL  195 - FYS: First Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ESL  299 - Directed Study - Matriculated (1 - 4)

ESL  390 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

ESS  50 - Intercollegiate Sports (1)

Advanced instruction and coaching for intercollegiate competition in the following sports is open to students in acceptable physical condition who can qualify for a place on the team: baseball, basketball, cross-country, golf, soccer, tennis, and volleyball. Only the grade Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory is given. (If Satisfactory is granted, credit for the course will be counted toward the total units required for graduation, but will not be counted in computed grade point averages.) ESS majors may not use this credit towards the major. Must enroll during season, one semester per year. May be repeated for 4 units total credit. Offered every semester.

ESS  100 - Motor Skill Performance and Analysis (1)

ESS majors must take at least 4 sections, each chosen from 4 different areas. Sections meet two hours a week. Offered every semester.

ESS  120 - Foundations of Exercise and Sport Science (4)

Prerequisite: ESS majors only. An introductory course aimed at the entry level student. Focuses on the integration of biological, behavioral, and cultural perspectives in Exercise and Sport Science. Particular attention is paid to students' academic, personal, and professional expectations. Offered every semester.

ESS  200 - Statistics (4)

On completion of this course students will have an understanding of basic research methods and techniques and how these might be used in solving research problems, and basic statistical calculations and the relevance of their uses. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: ESS majors only.

ESS  220 - Motor Development (4)

Prerequisite: ESS majors and Child Studies minors only. Study of physical growth, body type, and motor development through childhood, adolescence, and the adult stages; age and sex differences in motor performance. Offered every semester.

ESS  240 - Interdisciplinary Study of Human Aging (4)

This course is intended to introduce students to a wide range of topics and disciplinary interests in gerontology and to explore their influence on the ability for older adults to successfully age in today's world. The changing demographics of the aging population will be emphasized as well as the biological, psychological and sociological effects of human aging. Offered intermittently.

ESS  290 - Special Topics in ESS (1 - 4)

ESS  300 - Kinesiology (4)

The purpose of this course is to analyze human movement using applied anatomy and biomechanics, with the goal of skill enhancement and injury prevention. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  310 - Exercise Physiology (4)

This couse will study how exercise affects the structure and function of the human body. Attention will be given to each bodily system as well as the biochemistry of exercise. A weekly laboratory familiarizes students with the assessment of human performance. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  310 - Laboratory (0)

ESS  315 - Exercise Psychology (4)

Study of the reciprocal relationship of body movement and inner states. Topics include motivation, stress, group and leadership dynamics, psychological skills, body image, burnout, and injury. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  320 - Motor Learning (4)

Study of interaction of cognitive, perceptual, task, and physical variables that influence skilled movement. Information-processing, dynamical, and neuroanatomical models are discussed. Applications include activities of daily living, elite motor skills, physical rehabilitation, and ergonomics/human factors. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  325 - Exercise and Disease Prevention (4)

This course examines the mechanisms of chronic disease, including the etiology, epidemiology, and role of exercise in the management and prevention of diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  330 - Exercise and Health Promotion (4)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools to develop effective exercise and health promotion interventions for a variety of populations. The undelying theories of exercise and health behavior and their application to program development will be studied. Exercise and health promotion program development including planning, implementation, and evaluation will be studied extensively. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  340 - Neuroscience (4)

The general purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the field of neuroscience. Emphasis is placed on the biological stuctures and functions of the brain and nervous system in health and disease. Offered every Spring. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  350 - Biomechanics (4)

The knowledge and methods of mechanics as applied to the structure and function of the living human system. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 and 300 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  352 - Motor Learning (4)

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Study of interaction of cognitive, perceptual, task, and physical variables that influence skilled movement. Information-processing, dynamical, and neuroanatomical models are discussed. Applications include activities of daily living, elite motor skills, physical rehabilitation, and ergonomics/human factors. Offered every Fall.

ESS  354 - Exercise Program Design (4)

This course will train students to develop exercise programs for health people and those with controlled diseases. Benefits and risks of physical activity will be discussed in addition to various methods of human performance and assessment and movement analysis. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 and 300 and 310 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  354 - Laboratory (0)

ESS  356 - Movement for Spec Grps (SL) (4)

The theory and practice of adaptive physical education as applied to the exceptional person. Topics studied include sensory impairments; behavioral and learning disorders; fitness and structural problems; cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic problems; interventions and activities for the special person. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  358 - Clinical Exercise Testing (4)

Clinical exercise physiology deals with the effects of chronic disease such as heart disease, obesity and diabetes on exercise capacity and the benefits of exercise training in managing chronic conditions. Lecture and laboratory experiences will introduce students to clinical exercise testing, electrocardiography, and exercise prescription for clinical populations. Offered every Fall. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 and 310 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  358 - Laboratory (0)

ESS  360 - Exercise and Healthy Kids (4)

Exercise and Healthy Kids will discuss major issues unique to health for children and youth. This course emphasizes the influencing factors of childhood obesity as well as examining sport participation, physically activity and nutrition from a global perspective. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  362 - Sport, Culture and Society (4)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Course focuses on local and global forces in the production and promotion of sport and fitness practices, representations, and discourses. Cross-listed With: SOC 324. Offered intermittently.

ESS  364 - Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary School PE (3 - 4)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. The elementary school physical education program. Games, sports, fundamental rhythm and dance, and other activities commonly taught at the elementary level. Offered intermittently.

ESS  366 - Curriculum and Instruction: Secondary School PE (4)

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Knowledge of selected curriculum issues, for example, physical education as a profession, patterns for organizing curricula, legal liability, health education, recreation, evaluation, supervision, and teaching problems and practices. Offered intermittently.

ESS  368 - Nutrition for Exercise and Health (4)

This course will study the influence of nutrition on both health and human performance. Students will study how diet affects the prevention of various disease processes as well as nutritional strategies that can be employed to enhance athletic performance. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 and 114 and 115 and 116 and ESS 120 and 200 and 220 (or consent of the instructor).

ESS  370 - (4)

Issues related to personal and community health. Areas of concern will be mental health, drug abuse, prejudice, personal safety, fitness, disease, environmental health, nutrition, and selected topics in human sexuality. Offered every semester.

ESS  372 - (4)

An emphasis on the social and psychological aspects of substance abusee and its prevention and treatment. Offered every semester.

ESS  376 - Teaching Sport Skills (4)

Prerequisites: ESS majors only; Junior standing. An analysis and methods of teaching class for students interested in teaching movement and sport skills in physical education, sport, and fitness settings. Offered intermittently.

ESS  390 - Special Topics in ESS (1 - 4)

Experimental course focusing on exploration and discussion of material which complements that found in the regularly offered curriculum. Topics are variable. Offered intermittently.

ESS  391 - CEU: Special Topics (1 - 4)

ESS  397 - Field Observation in Physical Education (1)

Prerequisites: ESS majors only; senior standing and permission of instructor. Observation of and assistance with physical education programs at middle and high school levels. Offered every semester.

ESS  398 - Professional Practicum (1 - 4)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Supervised work in a community setting relevant to exercise and sport science. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, specialist clinics, health and fitness clubs, hospitals, recreation centers, public and private organizations. Offered every semester.

ESS  399 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Prerequisite: ESS majors only. Written permission of the instructor and the dean is required. Offered every semester.

ESS  410 - Research Seminar (4)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Research methods and scientific research principles. In-depth explorations and discussion of latest findings, theories and applications. Topics variable. Offered intermittently.

FILI  101 - First Sem Filipino (4)

First Semester Filipino introduces students to the basic structure of the Philippine national language, its development, grammatical characteristics, and to learn basic "survival" Filipino vocabulary. It also exposes students to important Filipino non-verbal discourse and communication patterns. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

FILI  102 - Second Sem Filipino (4)

Prerequisite: TAGL/FILI 101 or permission of instructor. This course introduces non-native speakers to an intermediate understanding and comprehension of the Filipino language, its development, and grammatical characteristics. It exposes students to intermediate-level Filipino discourse, exchange, and vocabulary using a functional-situational approach. It also immerses intermediate level students to important Filipino non-verbal communication patterns. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

FILI  201 - Third Sem Filipino (4)

Prerequisite: FILI/TAGL 102 or permission of instructor. This course introduces non-native speakers to an advanced understanding and comprehension of the Filipino language, its development, and grammatical characteristics. It exposes students to advanced-level Filipino discourse, exchange, and vocabulary using a functional-situational and culture-media immersion approaches. It also immerses advanced level students to simple and complex Filipino verbal and non-verbal communication patterns.

FILI  202 - Fourth Sem Filipino (4)

Prerequisite: FILI/TAGL 201. Emphasis on speaking and listening skills given specific social-cultural situations, and reading and writing skills that center on cultural material. More grammatical structures. Exposure to and understanding of written material such as essays, poems, songs, and recipes.

FILI  398 - Directed Study (1)

FREN  100 - Intensive French (8)

French 100 combines first and second semesters of Elementary French while offering a smaller class size (16 students), cutting edge language learning technologies, and a small stipend to support outings in the City.

FREN  101 - First Semester French (4)

An elementary French course. Accent on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the beginners level. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

FREN  102 - Second Semester French (4)

Prerequisite: FREN 101 or equivalent competence as determined by the placement test. Continuation of First Semester French. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

FREN  133 - Intermediate French Conv (2)

French conversation at the intermediate level. Introduction to French and Francophone culture and society. (May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units of credit). Offered every semester.

FREN  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

FREN  201 - Third Semester French (4)

Prerequisite: FREN - 102 or equivalent competence as determined by the placement test. Review of grammar. Accent on developing listening, speaking, reading, and stress on conversation. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

FREN  202 - Fourth Semester French (4)

Prerequisite: FREN - 102 or equivalent competence as determined by the placement test. An intermediate-level course focusing on developing the elementary reading, writing, listening and speaking skills as well as grammar acquired in the first year. In addition, there is an increased focus on cultural knowledge and the inclusion of a full-length work of literature.

FREN  216 - Foreign Language Teaching Methodology (2)

Prerequisite: FREN 202 or SPAN 202 or SPAN 222. Required for all Spanish and French conversation tutors. While simultaneously teaching conversation sessions, students will specifically learn how to: identify issues underlying communicative language and task-based teaching,create well designed language learning activities that engage learners in communicative language learning tasks, sequence those tasks, apply appropriate language teaching terminology during class discussions, reflect about themselves as learners and teachers, and participate in intellectual discussions about second language acquisition and foreign language teaching issues.

FREN  250 - Africa Films Africa (CD) (4)

The diversity of the African continent as seen through the eyes of its filmmakers. Weekly viewings and discussions will be informed by critical literature on African film and its place in the West and the developing world.

FREN  255 - Diplomatie Sans Frontieres (4)

This course is designed to serve students intending to do internships or gain employment in French-speaking environments or countries. Although fully developing the language skills to function in international institutions takes years, learning the conventions associated with different kinds of communication and expanding your vocabulary in the areas of your specialization (whether it is politics, commerce, human rights, cultural diplomacy) can facilitate your assimilation once you find yourself immersed in that kind of environment.

FREN  260 - a.k.a. Africa: Mapping Identities in African Literature and Film (4)

A substantial introduction to the literature and flim of the African continent. Works from five different regions and more than a dozen countries ranging from traditional folk talkes to experimental novels will expose students to the diversity of the continent through its rich literary heritage.

FREN  265 - Les Enfants Terribles (4)

What can we learn from rebellious figures, those men and women who refuse to live by the rules? Meet some of France’s celebrated “unruly children,” explore their creative contributions to contemporary French culture, and brush up on your colloquial French. Prerequisite: FREN 202

FREN  275 - Cultures de France (4)

Prerequisite: FREN - 202 or equivalent. French culture and civilization focuses on the study of French society from 1851 to the present through cultural phenomena in the context of major historical, political, and social events.

FREN  312 - Finesses de la langue (2)

This course is designed to help students develop a greater understanding and appreciation of the subtleties of the French language. They will develop their vocabulary, grammatical sophistication, and reading proficiency.

FREN  315 - Paris: Biographie d’une ville (4)

This course offers a study of cultural currents that have made Paris a global metropolis. It invites students to explore diverse facets of Parisian life and encourages them to look at French culture through their own experience and artistic sensitivity.

FREN  320 - Le plaisir du texte (4)

An introduction to reading and analyzing literary works, with special emphasis on the acquisition of critical vocabulary through readings in major genres (poems, plays, novels) and multiple writing assignments.

FREN  322 - Le bon sens et la folie (4)

An introduction to the major literary currents of the 17th and 18th centuries, to the historical events that helped shape them, and to other cultural manifestations associated with them.

FREN  324 - Guerre et paix (4)

An introduction to the major literary currents of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries to the historical events that helped shape them, and to other cultural manifestations associated with them.

FREN  330 - Rencontres: L’Afrique francophone (4)

An intensive and comprehensive introduction to the literature and culture of the almost thirty French speaking countries of Africa through representative texts produced in three very culturally diverse regions: North, West and Central Africa.

FREN  332 - Rencontres: Le monde francophone (4)

An intensive and comprehensive introduction to the Francophone world excluding Africa (which is covered in French 330). Texts, DVDs, and artifacts will be used as the basis for an exploration of the literary, cinematic and popular production, and the cultural and linguistic specificity of French-speaking groups in North America, the Caribbean, Southeast Asia and Oceania.

FREN  340 - French Cinema and Literature (4)

A comprehensive history of French Cinema and literature from the turn of the 20th Century to the present. Students will read, analyze, compare and contrast literary and cinematic works of each significant period starting with the invention of the first camera and the Lumiere's Brothers' first films to the different movements that influenced today's film and literary productions. Taught in English.

FREN  350 - Paris-Berlin: Connections and Contrasts at the Turn of the 20th Century (4)

The course explores the many cultural exchanges between France and Germany from the late 1800s to the early decades of the 20th century. In this period, Paris and Berlin were centers of artistic productions. The new perspectives in literature, art, architecture, and film of this period and their integration with social and political developments are focal points. The foundation is Nietzsche's manifesto of personal self-overcoming.

FREN  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

FREN  398 - Dir Reading and Research (1 - 6)

Individual project on various topics of French and Francophone studies to be determined with the instructor. Written permission of the department chair and the dean is required. Offered every semester at the upper-division level only to help students complete their requirements for the major or the minor.

FREN  399 - Internship (1 - 9)

Internship in French companies (businesses or financial institutions), or French government agencies (Consulate, Chamber of Commerce). Written permission of the instructor, the department chair and the dean is required.

FREN  440 - Seminar: Special Topics in French Literature and Culture (4)

Examples of courses: Images du féminin; Conditions de l'amour; Culture des affaires.

FREN  450 - Seminar: Special Topics in Francophone Literature and Culture (4)

Examples of courses: Carte d'identité; Migrations; L'Algérie francaise, la France algérienne.

GERM  101 - First Semester German (4)

Intensive grammar, composition, and conversation. Stress on the spoken language. Offered every Fall. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

GERM  102 - Second Semester German (4)

Prerequisite: GERM - 101 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Intensive grammar, composition and conversation. Continuation of 0109-101. Offered every Spring. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

GERM  102 - German 102 Language Practicum (0)

GERM  201 - Third Semester German (4)

Prerequisite: GERM - 102 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Review of grammar, composition, extensive reading and conversation. Offered every Fall.

GERM  202 - Fourth Semester German (4)

Prerequisite: GERM - 201 or equivalent competence as determined by the department.. Review of grammar, composition, extensive reading and conversation.

GERM  305 - Conversation and Writing (4)

Geared to improve oral proficiency. Focuses on everyday situations, mannerisms and expressions, e.g., restaurants, telephone, public institutions such as the post office, banks, public transportation. Offered every Fall.

GERM  310 - Advanced Readings and Composition (4)

Taught in German. This course stresses advanced grammar, especially problems of syntax; secondly, its focus is on creative writing and discussion; finally, the course introduces the critical reading of advanced literary texts. Offered every Sprng.

GERM  315 - Contemporary German Civilization (4)

Prerequisite: GERM - 310 or consent of instructor. Taught in German. Addresses the rise of post-war Germany as a democracy and the process of Reunification. Examines the parliamentary system, Germany as an economic power and her place in the European Union, as well as customs and traditions. Offered every Fall.

GERM  318 - Jewish Literature and Culture in 20th Century Europe (4)

This course focuses on literary expressions of Jewish culture and living conditions in 20th century Europe. Issues of assimilation and exclusion and the rise of anti-Semitism escalating in the Holocaust shall be discussed, as well as testimonies of survivors and the renewal of Jewish communities, particularly in reunified Berlin. Cross-listed with Judaic Studies.

GERM  320 - German Literature and Culture/1945-Today (4)

This course focuses on German literature and film from the end of WWII to the present. Special themes are post-war trauma, Germany's division, the fall of the Wall, and cultural diversity in the “new” Republic. Discussions of texts in different genres, including prose, poetry, theory, and film, provide an understanding of the contexts in which personal and (trans-)national issues are expressed and new ideas and forms are developed. Taught in English, Core C Literature.

GERM  350 - Paris-Berlin: Connections and Contrasts at the Turn of the 20th Century (4)

The course explores the many cultural exchanges between France and Germany from the late 1800s to the early decades of the 20th century. In this period, Paris and Berlin were centers of artistic productions. The new perspectives in literature, art, architecture, and film of this period and their integration with social and political developments are focal points. The foundation is Nietzsche's manifesto of personal self-overcoming.

GERM  398 - Dir Reading and Research (1 - 4)

The written permission of the instructor, the department chair and the dean is required. Offered every semester.

GREK  101 - First Sem Ancient Greek (4 - 6)

An intensive introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Attic Greek, supplemented with readings from various Greek authors. Offered every Fall.

GREK  102 - Second Sem Ancient Greek (4 - 6)

Continuation of First Semester Greek. Offered every Spring.

GREK  201 - Third Sem Ancient Greek (4)

GREK  398 - Dir Reading and Research (1 - 6)

The written permission of the instructor, the department chair, and the dean is required. Offered every semester.

HEBR  101 - First Semester Hebrew (4)

Intensive study of grammar, composition, and conversation. Stress on the spoken language. Introduction to Biblical Hebrew. Offered every Fall. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

HEBR  102 - Second Semester Hebrew (4)

Continuation of First Semester Hebrew. Offered every Spring This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

HEBR  201 - Third Semester Hebrew (4)

HEBR  398 - Dir Reading and Research (1 - 6)

The written permission of the instructor, the department chair and the dean is required.

HIST  110 - European Civilization (4)

This course provides working familiarity with the major ideas and developments of European civilization from antiquity to the present. Offered every semester.

HIST  115 - European/U.S. History (4)

This course will prepare prospective elementary-school teachers in the fields of European and United States history, as required by the public school standards of the State of California. It will cover European history from the ancient civilizations of the Near East up through the Enlightenment and United States history from the colonial era up through the industrial revolution. Open only to students in the Dual Degree program.

HIST  120 - History of the U.S. (4)

The course will acquaint students with the political, social, economic, ethnic and international dimensions of the history of the United States. It aims to stimulate both analytical and moral understanding of critical issues from the nation's past. Offered every semester.

HIST  125 - African American History (4)

This course introduces students to the diverse experiences of African Americans throughout U.S. history and their impact on American politics, economy and culture. Topics will include slave life and resistance, quests for citizenship, military involvement, and the rise of the Black Nationalist and Civil Rights Movements.

HIST  128 - US Citizenship: Hist.of People (4)

This course provides an introduction to the historic struggles of diverse Americans to be recognized as citizens of the United States. Using the framework of citizenship, the course explores the ways that systems of power and inequality have been both constructed and challenged throughout American history. (No prerequisites).

HIST  130 - East Asian Civilizations (CD) (4)

Introductory survey of the three East Asian civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea. The course offers a selective treatment of key issues and important achievements of these societies. Its methodology is historical, analyzing the political, economic, social, and cultural institutions as they have developed from antiquity to the present. The emphasis will be on the modern period, primarily after the middle of the nineteenth century. Offered every semester.

HIST  135 - Indian Civilizations (4)

A broad survey of South Asian history from antiquity to modern times. Beginning with the rise of the Indus valley civilization, the course considers topics like European colonialism and imperialism, nationalism, and the post-independence period. Offered intermittently.

HIST  140 - Latin American Perspectives (CD) (4)

A social and cultural survey from pre-Columbian roots to the present, focusing on how Latin Americans have shaped their lives within colonial, authoritarian, and paternalistic societies. Offered every semester.

HIST  150 - Modern African History (4)

This course introduces students to the diverse history of Africa from 1450 to the present. Topics examined include the development of African societies and political systems, internal and external slave trades, African societies and politics, African resistance to foreign rule, European colonization, nationalist struggles for independence, and legacies of colonial rule.

HIST  160 - World History (4)

This course offers a broad survey of world history, focusing especially on the period from 1400 to the present. Limited to History majors.

HIST  195 - Feast and Famine: A History of Food (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

HIST  210 - Historical Methods (4)

A study of the history of historical writing based on primary sources, and devoting attention to the theories, philosophies, methodologies, and issues of interpretation that arise from the texts. Completion of a research paper on an approved topic. Required of all History majors and suggested for History minors. Offered every semester.

HIST  220 - World Geography (4)

Systematic approach to the spatial distribution of resources, populations, cultural features, processes, and relationships. Required of students who would like to obtain a teaching credential in the Social Sciences. Offered every other year.

HIST  259 - The Civil Rights Movement in History and Film (4 - 6)

Explores the history of the civil rights movement in the U.S. through scholarship and film. Considers historical scholarship and historical films as complementary ways of understanding the history of the movement.

HIST  269 - Oral History (4)

Introduction to oral history, its evolution, methodology, and application. Students will learn about the many facets of the oral history process, interview techniques, the nature of oral historical evidence, transcribing and editing, legal and ethical concerns, and the various uses of oral history. Offered intermittently.

HIST  270 - Sex and TransgressionIslWrld (4)

This course explores sexuality and transgression in the pre-modern, colonial, and modern Muslim world including the Ottoman and Qajar Empires, and the modern Middle East.

HIST  290 - Special Topics in Historical Methodology (4)

Experimental course focusing on exploration and discussion of material which complements that found in the regularly offered history curriculum. Topics are variable; the course involves the study of rarely-taught subject matter and/or innovative approaches to traditional historical themes. Offered intermittently.

HIST  300 - The World Since 1945 (4)

An interpretive political history of the world since 1945, focusing on major actors, events, and international affairs, both Western and non-Western. Offered intermittently.

HIST  310 - The Ancient Near East (4)

The rise and development of the societies, cultures, religions and governments of the eastern Mediterranean (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Palestine, Asia Minor, Minoan Crete and Mycenean Greece), from the fourth millennium to about 1000 B.C. Offered every other year.

HIST  311 - The Classical Mediterranean World, 1200 B.C. to 31 A.D. (4)

A study of the new forms of society, culture, economy, and government that arose in the central and eastern Mediterranean after the collapse of ancient civilization around 1200 B.C.; the origins of the Greek city-states; the creations of the new empires by Athens, Alexander the Great, and the Romans; the creation of classical literature, philosophy, and art. Offered every other year.

HIST  312 - The Roman Empire (4)

The origins and evolution of Roman imperial society, government, and culture, from the first century B.C. to the third century A.D. The class also examines the interrelationship between archaeology and history as a means of discovering the past. Offered every other year.

HIST  313 - Late Antiquity (4)

The evolution and reorganization of the late Roman Empire, and a study of its social, cultural, religious, and political transformations. Offered every other year.

HIST  314 - Medieval Europe (4)

The social, economic, political, cultural and administrative revolutions of the twelfth through the early fifteenth century in Western Europe. Offered every other year.

HIST  315 - The Renaissance Europe (4)

During the Renaissance, artists such as Leonardo da Vinci began to experiment with new visual techniques, theorists such as Machiavelli forwarded bold and new political ideas, and Italian merchants began to perfect an economy based on currency and trade. These developments helped end the Middle Ages and, in the long run, paved the way for the rise of secularism, individualism, mass communication, and capitalism – in short, the rise of modern society. Yet, as this course will reveal, there is more to the Renaissance than beautiful art and the beginnings of progress. Themes include the persistence of the “medieval”; princely and papal courts; gender and religion in everyday life; early printed books; politics and conspicuous consumption; European encounters with Islam; art and society; and the value of the idea of the Renaissance today. Offered intermittently.

HIST  316 - Religion and Society in Reformation Europe (4)

How did an arcane theological dispute explode into what some call the first successful mass media campaign in history? We trace the massive cultural, political, and social changes that the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reform wrought in sixteenth-century Europe, not only in the realm of religion, but also in politics, popular culture, gender roles, and printed communications. Taught intermittently.

HIST  317 - Transatlantic Encounters: Europe in the Americas, 1492-1700 (4)

We examine the first major wave of European exploration, conquest, and colonization in the Americas from 1492 to 1700, a complex series of encounters that profoundly changed European, American, and African peoples and cultures on both sides of the Atlantic. Themes include religious and cultural interactions; violence and coexistence in everyday life; constructions of race, gender, and ethnicity; slavery and other forms of labor; trans-Atlantic migration, both voluntary and forced; and European and indigenous anthropologies of the ‘other.’ Focus is on Spanish, French, and Portuguese territories in Latin America.

HIST  318 - From Plague to Revolution: Early Modern Europe (4)

Tumultuous transformations marked the end of the Middle Ages in Europe. We examine the period that began with the Black Death, and led to the Renaissance, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the New World discoveries, scientific thought, and, finally, the French Revolution. Themes include witchcraft; sexuality, gender, and everyday life; women and religion; heresy and the Inquisition; and European encounters with the New World and Islam. Additional topics: the emergence of print; attitudes toward the poor and poverty; politics and the papacy; peasant revolt and religious change; and new consumer products such as coffee and sugar.

HIST  319 - Muslims, Christians and Jews in Medieval Spain (4)

Examines interactions between members of the three religions in Islamic and Christian Spain through Muslim, Jewish, and Christian historical sources, literature, art, and architecture. Also analyzes mythologizations of medieval Spain in modern films, literature, and scholarship. Offered every other year.

HIST  322 - The Holocaust (4)

The origins of European anti-Semitism and the history of Germany with focus on the persecution of Jews which culminated in genocide during World War II. The course examines the machinery of death as well as the bystanders, perpetrators and victims. The course also addresses the latest scholarly literature on the topic. Offered intermittently.

HIST  327 - Modern European Intellectual History (4)

Prerequisite: HIST - 110 or equivalent. A study of the breakthrough to modernity. The course covers major philosophical, cultural, and literary currents from Romanticism to the present day. Offered every other year.

HIST  330 - History of Britain to the Reformation (4)

This class examines the archaeology and history of Britain from about 8,000 BC to the re-appearance of Christianity in 600. Topics examined include human colonization of the island after the last Ice Age; the rise of the Neolithic period and its associated monuments, such as at Stonehenge and Orkney; the social, economic, and political transformations of the Iron Age; and the Roman conquest. The second half of the course will consider the the collapse of Roman Britain and the appearance and rise of the Anglo-Saxons.

HIST  331 - History of Sexuality (4)

An examination of the various and changing western attitudes towards human sexuality. While we might think that most men and women in western history have shared our own sexual beliefs, or at least those of our parents, we will discover that both the biological and the social understanding of this important human drive has been very contested over time and space. To this end,we will look at various sorts of sources: scientific and medical, philosophical, practical, theological, and literary. We will at the same time encounter some of the major trends in the historiography of sexuality, especially feminism and post-modernism, and see how these challenge our traditional understanding of the past. Offered intermittently.

HIST  332 - History of Ireland (4)

HIST  334 - History of Modern France (4)

The development of France from the Revolution of 1789 to the present. Offered intermittently.

HIST  335 - Modern German History (4)

A survey of the most important developments in Germany from the Bismarck Reich to the unification of 1990. Particular emphasis on the social, economic and cultural conflicts of the second Empire; the Weimar Republic; competing interpretations of the rise of Nazism; the Holocaust; and the post-World War II period. Offered intermittently.

HIST  338 - The History of Russia and the Soviet Union (4)

The course of Russian history from the time of Peter the Great to the fall of the Soviet Union. Offered intermittently.

HIST  340 - History of South Africa (CD) (4)

Introduction to South African history from the 16th century to the present. Topics examined include the interaction between African societies and European settlers, economic development, apartheid, the struggle for majority rule, and the problems plaguing the New South Africa. Offered every other year.

HIST  341 - Feast and Famine: A History of Food (4)

A comparative study of how food has shaped human societies and the environment. Topics include: food production, role of technology, food cultures, famine, and politics of food distribution. Case studies from Africa and the United States. Offered every other year.

HIST  342 - Environmental History of Africa (4)

Introduction to the environmental history of Africa from 1800 to the present. Topics examined include Africa's physical environment, role of natural resources in the development of African societies, demography, agriculture, desertification, deforestation, conservation, famine, and economic development. Offered every other year.

HIST  343 - Pre-Colonial Africa (CD) (4)

This course introduces students to the diverse history of pre-colonial Africa. Topics examined include the development of African states, spread of Islam, economic development, slave trades, and European interests in Africa. Offered every other year.

HIST  352 - The Civil War and Reconstruction (4)

An examination of the epic conflict between Northand South in 19th-century America. This course will analyze the causes of the war and explore the war's meaning to its varied participants: whites and African Americans, women and men, soldiers and civilians. It will trace the war's aftermath and its legacy for race relations in the United States. Offered every other year.

HIST  353 - The Gilded Age in U.S. History, 1870-1900 (4)

A study of the era named for its conspicuous display of wealth: an era of ascendant capitalism, the rise of big cities, racial segregation, and the acquisition of Hawaii and the Philippines.

HIST  357 - Topics in American Foreign Policy since 1840 (4)

A survey and analysis of critical events in American foreign policy, focusing on Mexican-American relations, the Spanish-American War and Cuba, the policies of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Roosevelt, World War II and the Cold War. Offered every other year.

HIST  358 - Women in U.S. History (4)

This course presents women's history both as an integral part of U.S. history and as a distinct subject of historical study. Using a variety of sources, it explores the private lives and public roles of women of different class, race, ethnic and religious backgrounds from the colonial period to the present. Offered every other year.

HIST  360 - American Women and Political Activism (4)

An overview of women's involvement in social and political movements in the U.S. from the 1880s to the 1990s. Topics include: the women's suffrage movement, social reform, anti-lynching campaigns, peace movements, labor politcs, feminism and anti-feminism, the civil rights and black power movements, and women in right-wing politics. Offered every other year.

HIST  361 - History of American Popular Culture (4)

A survey of the development and effect of popular culture in America, focusing on the rise of the Western, pulp fiction, popular music, the urban comic tradition, inspirational literature, movies, radio, and television. Offered every other year.

HIST  362 - Religion in United States History (4)

An examination of the central themes and issues in the history of American religion, emphasizing the links between religious experience and American society and culture. Offered every other year.

HIST  363 - Race and Ethnicity in United States History (4)

An exploration of the major racial and ethnic groups that have contributed to the making of American history, focusing on their distinctive cultures and patterns of interaction with one another. Offered every other year.

HIST  367 - The History and Geography of California (2 - 4)

A study of California's development from the American conquest and statehood to the present time of its social, economic, and political pre-eminence. Offered once per year.

HIST  370 - Colonial Latin America (4)

The blending of indigenous, European, and African cultures during the colonial period to form and create Latin America. This survey explores the tensions and richness embedded in this diverse and dynamic history and tracks how colonial attitudes and ideologies shape the region today. Offered every other year.

HIST  371 - Modern Latin America (4)

A survey of Latin America from the late colonial period to the present. Major themes include: political instability, authoritarianism, and the struggle for democracy; economic dependency, underdevelopment, and the search for national sovereignty; social inequality, culture wars, and recent religious transformations. Offered every other year.

HIST  372 - Indigenous and Col Mexico (4)

A comprehensive analysis of the social, political, economic and cultural history of colonial Mexico. Questions of power, identity, gender, race, ethnicity, and popular culture among Mexico's indigenous and colonial societies are central to the class. Course themes focus on pre-colonial societies, patterns of colonization in Northern, Central, and southern Mexico, development of a Spanish-Mexican society and culture, and the process leading to independence from Spain. Offered every other year.

HIST  373 - Modern Mexico (4)

A comprehensive analysis of the social, political, economic and cultural processes that shaped the growth and development of modern Mexico. Questions of power, identity, gender, race, ethnicity, and popular culture are central to the class. Course themes will focus on: nation building; the search for order, stability, industrialization, progress, modern development, popular upheaval, social reform, and national identity. Offered every other year.

HIST  374 - History of Central America and the Caribbean (4)

A comprehensive analysis of the historical processes that have shaped the lives, values, beliefs, and practices of the people of Central America and the Caribbean. It focuses on the region's response to global trends: colonization, integration into the world economy, imperialism, modernization, development, the cold war, and revolutionary movements. Offered every other year.

HIST  375 - Brazil and Amazonia (4)

Interdisciplinary survey of the geography, culture, and history of Brazil and Amazonia since 1500. Course themes include indigenous cultures, the impact of European expansion on the native people and the land, African and indigenous slavery, colonialism and its legacies, development, extractive economies, and nationalism. Offered every other year.

HIST  377 - The Southern Cone (4)

A survey and thematic comparison from the histories of Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Most of the material will date from the last two centuries with some attention given to the colonial period. Course themes include the impact and legacy of colonialism, the process of nation building, militarism and civilian politics, and the significance of women and modernization. Offered intermittently.

HIST  378 - Andean Nations (4)

A survey and thematic comparison of the histories of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela, focusing mostly on the national period. Salient themes include Andean civilizations and cultures, the impact of European colonialism, the process of nation building in multiethnic societies, violence and social change, and the tensions between dictatorship and democracy. Offered every other year.

HIST  379 - Latinos in the U.S. (4)

A study of the historical experiences of Mexican Americans/Chicanos, Central Americans, Puerto-Ricans, Cubans and Dominicans, as well as other Latin Americans living in the United States. Topics: identity, prejudice, immigration, social and political experiences, and participation in film, art, music, and other artistic expressions. Offered every other year.

HIST  380 - Traditional China to 1839 (4)

A broad survey of China's history prior to 1840, covering social, political, economic, and cultural developments. Offered intermittently.

HIST  381 - Modern China: Revolution and Modernization (4)

A broad survey of China since 1840, emphasizing China's response to the West and the impact of the Revolutions of 1911 and 1949. Offered every other year.

HIST  383 - Modern Japan Since Perry (4)

A survey of Japan's history after 1868, emphasizing its rapid modernization and its rise to great power status. Offered every other year.

HIST  384 - The Rise of China Since Mao (4)

A comprehensive survey of the enormous changes, yet also important continuities, in China's domestic and foreign policy since 1978. Important themes include the transition to a market economy or "market Leninism"; environmental impacts and the sustainability of growth; population policy; military modernization and the "China threat" scenario; village democracy and human rights issues; changing attitudes to sex and sexuality; and the search for values both new and traditional. Offered every other year.

HIST  385 - Living Muslim History (4)

This course is a study of moments in Muslim history through the lens of auto/biographical writing. Through such narratives, we will study the relationship between the past and the present in the Muslim world, how Muslim history has been lived and experienced, and how the drawing of national boundaries, the disappearance of old empires, and the experience of exile, displacement, and colonialism has shaped individual lives. Our sources include life narratives from the pre-modern Islamic world, auto/biographies and travel accounts written under Ottoman rule, and writings from colonial and post-colonial Asia and the Middle East. Though a study of the lives of people living in the Muslim world, this course will shed light on the universal nature of human experience, and on how experience is filtered through the specificity of historical circumstances. This course will introduce students to a theoretical approach for studying autobiography in the Muslim world, and to situating auto/biographies within the context of the times in which they were written. This approach includes challenging the Euro-American origins of the genre of “autobiography” and understanding the literary dimensions of historical narration.

HIST  386 - History of U.S.-China Relations (4)

A study of the United States-China relations from the 1780s to the present day, with special emphasis on the period since 1945. Offered every other year.

HIST  387 - History of U.S.-Japan Relations (4)

Consideration of a broad variety of political, social, economic, and cultural issues concerning America's relationship with Japan, beginning with Commodore Perry's visit in 1853 and including contemporary economic and security concerns. Offered every other year.

HIST  388 - Islamic Empires (4)

This is an upper-division course that addresses empire in the Islamic world. This course focuses on three Islamic Empires, the Ottoman Empire (1300-1922), the Safavid Empire (1501-1722), and the Mughal Empire (1526-1707) and is arranged both chronologically and thematically. While the focus of this course is pre-modern empire, this course will examine how a study of the pre-modern Islamic world challenges current narratives of empire, imperialism, and Islamic identity.

HIST  389 - The Modern Middle East (4)

This upper-division course provides students with a historical framework for understanding current political events in the Middle East and examines the intellectual trends that influence representations of the region. This course begins by framing the modern Middle East within the context of European imperialism in the 18th and 19th centuries, discusses decolonization and nationalism during the two World Wars, and concludes with the impact of American foreign policy on the Middle East today.

HIST  390 - Special Undergraduate Studies in History (2 - 4)

Experimental course focusing on exploration and discussion of material which complements that found in the regularly offered history curriculum. Topics are variable; the course involves the study of rarely-taught subject matter and/or innovative approaches to traditional historical themes. Offered intermittently.

HIST  396 - History Internship (SL) (4)

Provides an overview of the many ways that history is practiced in the field of public history. Includes supervised work at a public history placement, such as museums, archives, and historical sites. Offered once per year. • Prerequisite: HIST - 210 or permission of instructor.

HIST  398 - Directed Study (1 - 9)

Prerequisite: one or more upper-division courses in the area of the proposed topic for directed study. The written permission of the instructor and the dean is required. Offered undeer special circumstances.

HIST  410 - Undergraduate Seminar in European History (4)

Topics will be announced before the seminars are offered, and range from Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the early Modern period, to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Offered once per year.

HIST  420 - Undergraduate Seminar in United States History (4)

Topics vary. Offered once per year.

HIST  421 - Native Americans in U.S. History: Seminar (4)

Readings and discussions of major recent works exploring the place of Native American peoples in the history of the United States. The course will survey the field both chronologically and geographically, but will focus intensively on the impact of the dominant American culture on a selection of particular tribes. Offered intermittently.

HIST  425 - The American Revolution: Seminar (4)

Exploration of the history and meaning of the American Revolution through readings and discussion of major recent works. Covers the causes of the Revolution, the war years, and the political events up through ratification of the Constitution. Offered intermittently.

HIST  430 - Undergraduate Seminar in Latin American History (4)

A reading and research seminar focused on specific geographical areas - the Southern Cone, Brazil, the Andean Region, Central America and the Caribbean, Mexico, the Borderlands - or on particular comparative themes relevant to Latin America - Revolution, Religion, Labor and Politics, Women, Race and Class. Offered once per year.

HIST  440 - Undergraduate Seminar in Asian History (4)

Topics will be announced. Offered intermittently.

HIST  450 - Undergraduate Seminar in African History (4)

Topics will be announced. Offered intermittently.

HIST  470 - Honors Senior Thesis (4)

Offered every Fall.

HIST  471 - Honors Senior Thesis Continuation (4)

HON  312 - Ancient Greece and Rome (4)

The classical experience and imagination as the formative beginning and paradigm of Western civilization is traced through the study of select major literary works of Greek and Roman literature. The historical context, literary style, and intellectual influence of these works are explored and analyzed. Offered every Spring.

HON  314 - The Origins of Judaism and Christianity (4)

The intersection of the history, politics, religion, and culture of the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean World from 500 BCE to 500 CE is examined on the basis of primary literary and extra-literary sources. Particular attention is given to the origin and development of Judaism and Christianity within the course of empire building. Offered every Fall.

HON  316 - Late Antiquity and the Dawn of the Middle Ages (4)

Ranging from the conversion of the Roman Empire to the death of Charlemagne, this course examines the role of the humanities during the last days of the classical world and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Along with an examination of some of the most important works written during this 500-year period, the fine and minor arts and architecture are considered. Offered every Spring.

HON  318 - The Middle Ages: The Age of Chivalry (4)

This seminar discusses the phenomena of knight and court as fundamental social and civilizing processes in European culture (10th-14th Centuries) and the modern indebtedness to these phenomena. The seminar examines the concepts of kingship and its classical inheritance, and the aristocratic family as a culture of power. Special consideration is given to the characteristically medieval interrelationships between literature, art and music. Offered every Fall.

HON  322 - Renaissance Culture (4)

The relation of works of literature and art to the culture from which they arise is explored through the readings of Renaissance literary works and a stylistic analysis of Renaissance paintings. Students investigate the intricate ways in which the characteristic style of an age is manifested in its literature, politics, art, and other cultural phenomena. Offered every Spring.

HON  324 - Renaissance in England and Its Roots (4)

This seminar explores the English Renaissance from social, historical, artistic, and literary perspectives and provides both an overview of Renaissance art and an examination of new conceptions of "the universe," "art" and "man". Topics include: humanism; religious skepticism; political theory; the situation of women. Offered every Spring.

HON  326 - From Baroque to the Enlightenment (4)

Works of principal eighteenth century French and English studies on the nature of human society are read and discussed, and their influence on America considered. Styles of eighteenth-century art, literature and music, especially the opera, are examined as well. Offered every Fall.

HON  328 - The Social Implications of Scientific Rationality (4)

This seminar examines whether the Enlightenment-based progressive ideal of technological and scientific modernism has led to human happiness, justice, and progress, or alienation and destruction. Readings in science, social science, and philosophy (e.g., Kant, Condorcet, Weber, Foucault); studies in modern art. Offered every Spring.

HON  332 - The American Experience (4)

Through a reading (and viewing) of classic American works, including the autobiographies of Malcolm X and Richard Rodriguez, the essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson, the poetry of Emily Dickinson, the novels of Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Edith Wharton and Saul Bellow, the films and plays of Frank Capra and Sam Shepard and the painting of Edward Hopper, this seminar explores fundamental themes, tensions and values in U.S. culture. Offered every Spring.

HON  334 - Romanticism and Revolution: 19th Century Europe (4)

This seminar explores selected nineteenth century European classics that mirror the social mores and artistic revolution-texts prophetic and pre-modern. Major figures include Marx, Darwin, Freud, Ibsen and Dostoevsky. Offered every Fall.

HON  336 - The Socialist Tradition (4)

This seminar examines the key writings of the Socialist tradition in Europe, the U.S., and around the world. Readings will include classic works of socialist non-fiction, socialist biography and autobiography, and socialist perspectives on areas such as art, music, literature, film, photography, community, work, gender, race, class and political consciousness. Socialism's historical development and impact, and its present condition, will also be examined. Offered every Fall.

HON  338 - The Modern Period (4)

This seminar attempts to clarify the characteristically "modern" ways of defining and shaping reality through an examination of significant intellectual and imaginative works of our century, especially the "classical modern" period (1890-1950). What dominant insights do we inherit from living in (or just after?) an era which has self-consciously called itself "modern"? Works of fiction are synthesized with readings selected from the physical and social sciences as well as the humanities. Offered every Spring.

HON  339 - Late Modern Intellectual History; Existentialism and Humanism (4)

The course takes as its focus the question of how to live an ethical and meaningful life in a world no longer moored to universally accepted transcendental truths. The ancient Greeks called the search for practical wisdom phrónêsis, and modern philosophy has witnessed a renewed interest in practical questions about the art of living. The main reading will be taken from texts by the so-called "proto-existentialists," Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, as well as famous twentieth century existentialists such as Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir and other French feminists. Besides European philosophy, the course will also include readings, viewings and presentations from modern and postmodern art, photography, music, film and drama.

HON  498 - Directed Research (1 - 4)

After the completion of five seminars, students have the option of engaging in an approved research project under the direction of the Honors Program faculty. Written permission of instructor and dean required. Offered every semester.

IEP  1 - Academic Oral Comm Skills I (0)

Focus is on active listening and speaking skills that are necessary to function successfully in a university class. Development of listening strategies, note taking techniques, presentation skills and discussion skills are emphasized. Cross-listed with: ESL - 111.

IEP  2 - Academic Reading/Writing I (0)

Focus is on improving students' abilities in reading comprehension and vocabulary skills and on the organization and writing of paragraphs and short essays. Cross-listed with: ESL - 110.

IEP  3 - Grammar I (0)

Focus is on intermediate English grammar structures and functions. Cross-listed with: ESL - 113.

IEP  7 - Grad Writing/Speaking Pract (0)

Focus on academic writing and speaking skills needed by graduate students. (ESL 601 open to IME students ONLY.) Cross-listed with: ESL - 601 and ESL - 030.

IEP  11 - Academic Oral Comm Skills II (0)

Focus on active listening skills in academic and non-academic situations. Development of note taking techniques and discussion and writing skills needed when responding to academic lectures. Cross-listed with: ESL - 121.

IEP  12 - Acad Reading/Writing II (0)

Focus is on reading university-level material more rapidly and more efficiently, and on demonstrating comprehension through an articulate oral or written response and on the skills needed for writing academic reports and essays. Cross-listed with: ESL - 120.

IEP  13 - Grammar II (0)

Focus is on reviewing basic grammatical structures and acquiring more complex structures. Practice is communicative, both oral and written. Cross Listed With: ESL- 123

IEP  14 - Special Topics II (0)

IEP  15 - Seminar Series (0)

Focus on specific aspects of English such as idioms or vocabulary and overall improvement in English language skills. Cross-listed with: ESL - 115.

IEP  16 - TOEFL (0)

Prerequisite: paper and pencil TOEFL 460 and above /ibtTOEFL 48 and above. Focus on test taking and skill areas covered on the TOEFL test: listening, speaking, writing, and reading/vocabulary. Some focus on written structure also. Emphasis is on building test taking and language skills needed to do well on the TOEFL. Cross-listed with ESL - 116.

IEP  17 - Pronunciation I (0)

Designed for non-native speakers who wish to have more American pronunciation and speech patterns and who wish to gain confidence in using English in academic, professional and social situations. Cross-listed with: ESL - 132.

IEP  18 - Academic Reading/Writing III (0)

Focus on reading complex university-level material of various genres more efficiently and rapidly, on responding to readings and academic topics using multiple and appropriate writing and speaking genres, and on advanced academic writing, research and documentation skills. Cross-listed With: ESL 124.

IEP  19 - English for Business (0)

This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in all four basic language skills (reading, listening, writing, speaking) by surveying key areas of business and by providing students opportunities to understand and express key concepts in business. Cross-listed with ESL - 128.

IEP  20 - Oral Skills III (0)

Focus on high-level performance of longer speeches in academic and professional settings with emphasis on listening, complex construction, pronunciation, behavioral skills, visual aids, and greater comfort with a variety of audiences. Cross-listed with ESL-122.

IEP  21 - Grammar III (0)

Focus is on accuracy, fluency and meaningful use of complex structures in context and in various types of discourse, both oral and written. Cross Listed with: ESL-126.

IEP  31 - Integrated Skills (0)

IEP  32 - Oral Communication Skills (0)

IEP  41 - Integrated Skills I (0)

Low intermediate level. Focus is on improving students' basic English skills of grammar, reading, vocabulary, and writing.

IEP  42 - Oral Communication Skills I (0)

Low intermediate level. Focus is on conversational skills, pronunciation, and vocabulary in daily situations.

IEP  51 - Integrated Skills II (0)

Intermediate level. Focus is improving students' basic English skills of grammar, reading, vocabulary, and writing with some discussion.

IEP  52 - Oral Communication Skills II (0)

Intermediate level. Focus is on listening and speaking skills in daily situations. Academic oral skills are also introduced.

IEP  61 - Integrated Skills III (0)

Low advanced level. Focus is on integration of the basic English skills of grammar, reading, vocabulary, and writing.

IEP  62 - Oral Communication Skills III (0)

Low advanced level. Focus is on listening and speaking skills in daily situations and academic settings.

IEP  71 - Integrated Skills IV (0)

High advanced level. Focus is on integration of the basic English skills of grammar, reading, vocabulary, and writing for academic purposes.

IEP  72 - Oral Communication Skills IV (0)

High advanced level. Focus is on listening and speaking skills in daily situations and academic settings.

IEP  73 - Business English (0)

Focus is on integration of listening, speaking, reading, and writing using business content.

IEP  81 - Integrated Skills V (0)

IEP  82 - Oral Communications V (0)

IEP  83 - Pronunciation I (0)

This course is an introduction to American English pronunciation.

IEP  84 - Pronunciation II (0)

This advanced course improves American English pronunciation and includes presentation contexts.

IEP  85 - Vocabulary and Idioms I (0)

This course is an introduction to academic vocabulary and common idioms in the U.S. at the intermediate level.

IEP  86 - Vocabulary and Idioms II (0)

This course focuses on increasing the academic vocabulary and idioms of multilingual students at the advanced level.

IEP  87 - Introductory Academic Reading and Writing (0)

This course focuses on improving students’ abilities in reading comprehension, building spelling and vocabulary skills, and writing well-formed simple and complex sentences and well-organized paragraphs.

IEP  88 - Introductory Academic Oral Communication Skills (0)

Focus is on basic listening and speaking skills that are necessary to function successfully in daily life and in a university class.

IEP  89 - Introductory Grammar (0)

Focus is on reviewing basic grammatical structures and reinforcing correct application of basic grammar forms in writing and speaking.

INTD  50 - College Success I:Successful Strategy (1)

INTD  53 - CSC II: Explore Majors and Careers (1)

INTD  54 - College Success for Athletes (2)

INTD  55 - Peer Assistance and Education (1)

INTD  56 - Psychology of Success (1)

INTD  57 - PLTL Leadership Training (1)

INTD  59 - Listen To Your Life (2)

Most of us spend a great deal of our waking hours at work. One of the important questions we often consider throughout our lives is how to find work that enriches us with a meaningful life. In the Ignatian tradition: finding our vocations means discovering our gifts, listening to our hearts for divine guidance, and reaching out to live with greater joy and meaning. This class will give you the opportunity to discern your vocation by the aid of career asessments and listening to guest speakers (mostly USF alums) who have found how to apply their gifts and talents to the world. Each class will provide time to reflect on the information presented by maintaining a journal and class discussion. When a keen sense of self is combined with knowledge of how you would like to apply your interests and talents, you will have arrived at a working definition of your personal vocation.

INTD  100 - Martin Baro Scholars Prog (CD) (4)

INTD  101 - Martin Baro Scholars Prog (SL) (4)

INTD  110 - Intro to Teaching Profession (1)

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of education. Readings, class discussions, and speakers will engage current developments in primary and secondary education, seeking to both inspire and inform. By participating in this course students will have an opportunity to become part of a community of future educators and also become more fully engaged in student life, in addition to developing personal and professional skills with peers who share similar interests. Exploring need for strong teacher training to produce strong teachers, this course will also prepare students for participation in USF’s Dual Degree in Teacher Preparation Program.

INTD  200 - Maximizing Study Abroad: Language, Culture, and Intercultural Communication (2)

This course is designed to help students get the most out their study abroad experience, regardless of the destination or duration of their term abroad. Students will explore the nature of the relationship between language and culture through the theory, research, and methods of the fields of Ethnography of Communication and Intercultural Communication.

INTD  201 - Introduction to Teaching as a Profession (1)

INTD 201 is a 1-unit undergraduate course designed to introduce students to the field of education. Readings, class discussions, and speakers will engage current developments in primary and secondary education, seeking to both inspire and inform. By participating in this course students will have an opportunity to become part of a community of future educators and also become more fully engaged in student life, in addition to developing personal and professional skills with peers who share similar interests. Exploring need for strong teacher training to produce strong teachers, this course will also prepare students for participation in USF’s Dual Degree in Teacher Preparation Program.

INTD  210 - Esther Madriz Transborder (0)

INTD  211 - GLC Belize Immersion Trip (0)

INTD  220 - Catholic Social Thought (4)

INTD  260 - Africa: Map Identities (CD) (4)

A substantial introduction to the literature and film of the African continent. Works from five different regions and more than a dozen countries ranging from traditional folk tales to experimental novels will expose students to the diversity of the continent through its rich literary heritage.

INTD  298 - Directed Study (0 - 2)

INTD  301 - Erasmus Community (4)

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INTD  302 - Erasmus Community (SL) (4)

INTD  303 - Erasmus Overseas Program (0)

INTD  303 - Erasmus Overseas Program Dummy (0)

INTD  328 - Pre-Travel Course for Zambia Today (2)

This 2 credit course is offered in the spring semester to prepare students for the USF study abroad summer program in Africa, Zambia Today INTD 331-01 (SL). The course creates integrated learning and service opportunities in communities impacted by HIV/AIDS in the Bay Area and offers great opportunities for interaction and reflection, for personal and interpersonal development and for serving and learning.

INTD  329 - India Today (2 - 4)

INTD  330 - South Africa Today (SL/CD) (4)

This course offers students the opportunity to learn about the complexities of race relations in South Africa, the struggle agains Apartheid, and the problems plaguing the New South Africa. The four-week tour includes visits to townships, rural communities, and urban development centers. Students meet and learn from South African activists working on social justice issues such as the problems of streeet children, gender inequity, HIV/AIDS, and environmental conservation. Offered every summer.

INTD  330 - South Africa Today/Travel (0)

INTD  331 - Zambia Today (SL) (4)

Zambia, which derives its name from the Zambezi River is home of the Victoria Falls, Mosi-oa-Tunya (the smoke that thunders), and lies in a region with the highest AIDS prevalence in the world. The service learning course in Zambia will explore the strength of a community pulling together (ubuntu) to get beyond the AIDS impasse. This 4 credit USF Study Abroad Summer Program, will achieve the best outcome through a synthesis of pre-travel service learning and a post travel reflection paper.

INTD  332 - Tunisian Cultural Anthropology (3)

INTD  333 - Tunisian Arabic II (3)

INTD  334 - Egypt Today (4)

INTD  336 - Contemporary Spain (2)

For two weeks, you will live in the heart of the Basque Region of northern Spain, an area rich with Roman, Jewish, Arab and Basque cultures, a diverse geography, and a complex social, political and economic environment. Bilbao is a historic and a modern city where you can discover history, art and gain insight into the current social, political and economic issues facing Spain. Some of the important landmarks include the Guggenheim Museum-Bilbao and the Peace Museum in Gernika close by Bilbao. You will also travel to Madrid, the heart and capital of Spain, and to historic cities of Toledo and Segovia. You will be immersed in the language and culture of Spain with a unique opportunity to experience some of the most complex cultures in all of Europe. Offered in collaboration with Universidad de Deusto and USF's Latin American Studies Program.

INTD  336 - Contemporary Spain/Travel (0)

INTD  337 - French Studies in Lille (4)

INTD  340 - African Lit: Islamic Perspect (4)

The course will explore the imaginative responses to Islam by sub-Saharan African writers. The full gamut of literary responses to Islam will be examined, ranging from those by outright Islamic promoters, such as Cheikh Hamidou Kane and Tahir Ibrahim, to those of Ayi Kwei Armah, who portrays Islam as violent and colonial in nature. Offered intermittently.

INTD  342 - China Today:Immersion (CD/SL) (4)

Course is taught in China.

INTD  350 - Davies Seminar (4)

INTD  350 - Laboratory (0)

INTD  360 - Glob Serv-Learn Sust Dev Semin (4)

This preparatory seminar for the Global Service-Learning Fellowship establishes an intellectual foundation upon which students’ international experiences in Bolivia, India and Uganda will be built. The classes will be composed of a multidisciplinary introduction to the ideas of sustainable development and the application of these concepts in the international context(s). Topics include historical, political, economic and programmatic perspectives on sustainability and development, in addition to discussion of the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the development process. The preparatory seminar will also include basic coverage of service-learning, cultural competency, asset-based community-development and reflective learning.

INTD  361 - Glob Serv-Learn Sus Dev Intern (2)

Students will spend 10 weeks engaged in full-time service-learning internships at grassroots organizations in Bolivia, India or Uganda. Responsibilities will include contributing to the organization's existing programs and services, while also gathering data to inform the implementation of grant-funded sustainable development projects. Students will engage in written and oral reflection about how their experience connects with course content, shapes their own personal values, and informs their understanding of their host community's pressing social issues.

INTD  362 - Glob Serv-Learn Res/Refl Semin (2)

This course guides students to make personal, professional, and academic meaning of their global service experiences. Key elements include a social science research paper evaluating a critical issue for the host community, written and oral reflection on ethical dilemmas of sustainable development abroad, and an oral presentation combining students’ academic research and personal reflections on their work.

INTD  363 - Econ of the Developing World (2)

This course offers a solid academic foundation for understanding the contemporary history and current reality of social, political, and economic development in Bolivia, India, and Uganda. Through seminar-style discussion, written reflections, and presentations, students will engage with topics oriented at preparing them for the Global Service Learning Program in those three countries the following summer.

INTD  385 - DDTP Fieldwork I (1 - 2)

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to experience, in a practical environment, the application of methodological principles and teaching practices, as well as theories and principles of learning, motivation, social behavior, human development and individual differences acquired in their Teacher Education courses. They will be involved in classroom observation, one-to-one assistance, small group work and delivery of a whole class activity. Each student will work with a specific mentor in a specific classroom for the length of the semester. The field placement requires observation and/or participation 3 hours per week in elementary classrooms (K-2 or 3-5 grade level) for MS candidates and middle or high school classrooms for SS candidates. Field placement is arranged by the DDTP Field Placement Coordinator. A weekly on-campus seminar is included. Readings, class discussions and guest speakers will enable the students to incorporate their learning in the field with the content presented in their Teacher Education course work.

INTD  386 - DDTP Fieldwork II (1 - 2)

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to experience, in a practical environment, the application of methodological principles and teaching practices, as well as theories and principles of learning, motivation, social behavior, human development and individual differences acquired in their Teacher Education courses. They will be involved in classroom observation, one-to-one assistance, small group work and delivery of a whole class activity. Each student will work with a specific mentor in a specific classroom for the length of the semester. The field placement requires observation and/or participation 3 hours per week in elementary classrooms (K-2 or 3-5 grade level) for MS candidates and middle or high school classrooms for SS candidates. Field placement is arranged by the DDTP Field Placement Coordinator. A weekly on-campus seminar is included. Readings, class discussions and guest speakers will enable the students to incorporate their learning in the field with the content presented in their Teacher Education course work.

INTD  387 - DDTP Fieldwork III (1 - 2)

This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to experience, in a practical environment, the application of methodological principles and teaching practices, as well as theories and principles of learning, motivation, social behavior, human development and individual differences acquired in their Teacher Education courses. They will be involved in classroom observation, one-to-one assistance, small group work and delivery of a whole class activity. Each student will work with a specific mentor in a specific classroom for the length of the semester. The field placement requires observation and/or participation 3 hours per week in elementary classrooms (K-2 or 3-5 grade level) for MS candidates and middle or high school classrooms for SS candidates. Field placement is arranged by the DDTP Field Placement Coordinator. A weekly on-campus seminar is included. Readings, class discussions and guest speakers will enable the students to incorporate their learning in the field with the content presented in their Teacher Education course work.

INTD  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

INTD  395 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

INTD  395 - Special Topics Dummy (0 - 4)

INTD  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Permission of Instructor, Program Director, and Dean required.

INTD  399 - Public Service and Community Engagement Capstone (2)

This seminar is the culmination of a course of study in public service and community engagement. Its purpose is to guide students in analysis of concepts of service, social justice, and community engagement through the lens of academic scholarship and personal experience.

ITAL  101 - First Semester Italian (4)

Intensive grammar, composition, and conversation. Stress on the spoken language. Offered every Fall. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

ITAL  101 - Italian 101 Language Practicum (0)

This one-hour language practicum provides training in speaking and listening skills, in small group settings, that reinforces classroom instruction. Non-credit, but required as a co-requisite for all enrolled in the class.

ITAL  102 - Second Semester Italian (4)

Prerequisite: ITAL - 101 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Intensive grammar, composition and conversation, stress on spoken language. Continuation of ITAL 101. Offered every Spring. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

ITAL  102 - Italian 102 Language Practitum (0)

ITAL  201 - Third Semester Italian (4)

Prerequisite: ITAL - 102 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Review of grammar, reading, stress on composition. Continuation of ITAL 102. Offered every Fall.

ITAL  201 - Italian 201 Language Practicum (0)

ITAL  202 - Fourth Semester Italian (4)

Prerequisite: ITAL - 201 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Review of grammar, stress on reading, conversation and composition. Offered intermittently in the Spring.

ITAL  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

ITAL  398 - Dir Reading and Research (1 - 4)

Directed Reading and Research (1-4) The written permission of the instructor, the department chair and the dean is required. Offered every semester.

JAPN  101 - First Semester Japanese (4)

This course will introduce basic Japanese grammar, vocabulary, and writing systems (katakana and hiragana), together with some relevant aspects of Japanese culture. Emphasis on developing communicative conversational skills. Offered every Fall. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

JAPN  102 - Second Semester Japanese (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 101 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of JAPAN 101. Some basic kanji will be introduced. The course will focus on developing conversational skills and reading/writing skills. Offered every Spring. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

JAPN  191 - Business Japanese 1 (4)

This course will introduce basic Japanese business communication and the Japanese writing systems (katagana and hiragana). The course is designed for beginners, so no prerequisite is required. It will focus on developing conversational skills in business contexts and on understanding Japanese business customs, manners, and structures. Offered every Spring.

JAPN  192 - Business Japanese 2 (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 191 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of JAPAN 190. Kanji typically used for Japanese business will be introduced. Offered every Fall.

JAPN  193 - Business Japanese 3 (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 192 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of JAPAN 192. This course will focus on developing business communication skills with relation to Japanese business customs, manners and structures. Offered every Spring.

JAPN  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

JAPN  201 - Third Semester Japanese (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 102 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of JAPAN 102. This course will develop communicative conversational skills and reading and writing skills and will familiarize the student with Japanese grammar, vocabulary, and kanji. Offered every Fall. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

JAPN  202 - Fourth Semester Japanese (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 201 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. Continuation of JAPAN 201. This course will provide extensive practice for conversation, reading, and writing for advancement to the intermediate level of Japanese. Offered every Spring. This course includes a mandatory one-hour weekly group conversation class with a tutor for nine weeks of the semester outside of the class meeting time.

JAPN  301 - Intermediate Japanese 1 (4)

• Prerequisite: JAPAN 202 or equivalent competence as determined by the Department. The course is grounded strongly in cultural content. It explores the Kanto region of Japan (Tokyo, Kamakura, and surrounding major cities as well as Shinkansen travel) along with its distinctive history and culture. The course also aims to develop the student’s Japanese language proficiency to the “Intermediate-Mid to Intermediate-High” level, according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines. Offered every Fall.

JAPN  302 - Intermediate Japanese 2 (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN 301. Continuation of JAPN 301. The course explores the Kansai region (in the south-western half of Japan, including Ise, Kyoto, Nara, Osaka) along with its distinctive history and culture. The course also aims to develop Japanese language proficiency to the “Intermediate-High” level, according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines. Offered every Spring.

JAPN  310 - Zen and the Art of Japanese Calligraphy (4)

This course aims to develop classical Japanese calligraphy skills and to engender a deeper appreciation of the calligraphic arts and of the role of Zen philosophy in Japanese culture. Application of the form and beauty of the characters also makes them easier to remember. The course will provide a hands-on tutorial of basic brush strokes and painting techniques. Offered every Fall.

JAPN  347 - Politics of China and Japan (4)

A study of the emergence of modern East Asia; political changes in China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan after 1945; survey of international developments.

JAPN  350 - Japanese Culture (CD) (4)

This course will introduce essential aspects of Japanese culture. It is taught in English and may be repeated for credit when different topics are treated. Offered every other Fall.

JAPN  351 - Contemporary Japanese Culture (4)

This course will explore various aspects of contemporary Japanese culture. It is taught in English. Offered every other Fall.

JAPN  355 - Japanese Literature in Translation (4)

This course will introduce the classics of Japanese literature as well as works by the Nobel laureates. The course is taught in English. Offered every Spring.

JAPN  357 - Naturalism in Japanese Literature (4)

A history of the Naturalist Movement in Japan, with special emphasis on Western literary influences, as well as native resistance to and adaptation of them, during this formative period in Japanese literature.

JAPN  360 - Japanese Calligraphy and Ink Painting (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 310. The course aims to develop Japanese calligraphy and sumi-e (ink painting) skills, to introduce the history of Japanese painting, and to engender a deeper appreciation of the calligraphic and sumi-e arts.

JAPN  368 - Japanese Religion and Society (CD) (4)

This course surveys nearly 2000 years of the religious traditions, heritage, and culture of the Japanese people. We will explore key texts, charismatic leaders, and periods of conflict and stability in our goal to understand both historical and contemporary religious and spiritual examples within Japan and abroad.

JAPN  370 - Zen Buddhism (4)

This course examines the origins, teachings, and practices of Zen Buddhism, from ancient China to contemporary East Asia and North America. It emphasizes both academic and participatory understanding of this tradition. Offered intermittently.

JAPN  379 - Buddhist Paths (4)

JAPN  383 - Modern Japan Since Perry (4)

A survey of Japan's history after 1868, emphasizing its rapid modernization and its rise to great power status. Offered every other year.

JAPN  387 - History of US/Japan Relations (4)

Consideration of a broad variety of political, social, economic, and cultural issues concerning America's relationship with Japan, beginning with Commodore Perry's visit in 1853 and including contemporary economic and security concerns. Offered every other year.

JAPN  390 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

JAPN  395 - Special Topics in Japanese (4)

Courses offered on an experimental basis. Topics vary. Offered intermittently.

JAPN  398 - Directed Reading and Research (1 - 4)

Permission of Instructor, Department Chair and Dean required.

JAPN  401 - (4)

Prerequisite: JAPN 302. Continuation of JAPN 302. The course explores the southern regions of Japan, including Chugoku, Shikoku, Kyushu, and Okinawa, along with their distinctive histories and cultures. The course also aims to develop Japanese language proficiency to the “Intermediate-High to Advanced-Low” level, according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines. Offered every Fall.

JAPN  410 - Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (4)

Prerequisite: JAPAN - 202 (or equivalent competence). This course aims to develop linguistic knowledge about the Japanese language. The course will focus on understanding the Japanese language in terms of history, lexicon, phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics, and sociolinguistics. Such linguistic training provides essential background for teaching Japanese. Offered every Spring.

LAS  201 - Third Semester Spanish (4)

A one-semester intensive review of the basic structures of Spanish. Class conducted in Spanish, with activities designed to practice and consolidate all language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural readings to expand vocabulary, stimulate discussion, and broaden students' understanding of the Hispanic world. Offered every semester.

LAS  210 - Music of the Americas (CD) (4)

Topics include: music and its evolution, music and society, music and culture. Focus is on Latin American music, including music of the colonial period, and North American music from the Pilgrims to the twentieth century. Included are genres such as tango, samba, Chilean protest songs, Cuban and Mexican music, Andean music; the blues, jazz, swing; music of the Native Americans.

LAS  213 - Music of Brazil (4)

This course explores some of the more prominent music styles of Brazil. These styles will be introduced to students through the exploration of musical sounds, aesthetics, performance practices and contextualized within the distinctive socio-political moments of emergence and the role they play in articulating multiple identities and senses of belonging.

LAS  233 - Women in Developing Countries (CD) (4)

This course examines women's experiences in developing countries in the light of local and global inequalities and connections. Major theoretical approaches are used to understand how gender relationships shape and are shaped by development policies within national and global contexts. These approaches are illustrated by case studies in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Offered intermittently.

LAS  286 - Econ of Latin America (CD) (4)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 111 AND ECON 102 or ECON 112, or permission of the instructor. Economic theory and historical accounts are combined in an attempt to understand the various forces that have shaped economic development in Latin America. The first half of the course looks at historic and macroeconomic issues. We will discuss development policies ranging from the import-substituting industrialization policies of the 1950s-1970s, to the market-oriented reforms of the 1980s through the present. The second half of the course will look at microeconomic issues such as poverty, inequality, agriculture, education, and corruption.

LAS  301 - Religion in Latin America (4)

LAS  303 - Latin American Literature I (CD) (4)

This course covers a representative sample of the literature written in Latin America from the inception of Colonial power to Independence (from the 15th to the 19th century). Course is conducted in Spanish. Cross Listed With: LAS - 303.

LAS  305 - Latin@ American Performance and Culture (SL/CD) (4)

The course provides an overview of the plays, theatrical productions, and theatrical traditions of cultures in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and underrepresented cultures in the United States, including African-American, Asian-American, and Hispanic. Each semester one or two of these areas are selected for in-depth study.

LAS  309 - Art of the Americas (4)

Art of the Americas is an upper division art history course focusing on the art made by the numerous and different peoples of North and South America, from antiquity to the present.

LAS  311 - El Salvador Today/Travel (0)

LAS  312 - Sarlo Scholars: Global SL (2 - 4)

Helping Sarlo Scholars make the most of experiences in Uganda and Nicaragua, students write a 12-15 page social science research paper in a multi-step writing process all while critically evaluating their experiences in host countries.

LAS  313 - Latin@-Chican@ Cult and Society (4)

This course provides socio-historical and theoretical frameworks for understanding those U.S. populations known a Chicanos/as and Latinos/as. The course is intended for students who would like to rigorously pursue an independent research project that further expands their knowledge of these populations.

LAS  315 - Telenovelas/Soap Operas (4)

A survey of the soap opera and melodrama genre focusing on its Latino version: telenovelas. The course looks at the production, distribution, and content of soaps, and their audiences around the world. It explores questions of class, gender, race and ethnicity, and the use of soaps for education and social change.

LAS  317 - Latin American Cinema (4)

This course is an introduction to films made by Latin American filmmakers about Latin America. It explores how the national cinemas of the Americas narrate their history and portray their societies’ experiences, conflicts, and challenges. Students analyze films in historical and cinematic terms, exploring the various relations between cinema and the state, questions of ideology, national identity, class, race and ethnicity, gender, concerns about historical representations and political memory, and the use of film as a tool for social change.

LAS  322 - Liberation Theology (CD) (4)

This course engages with the transcendent biblical concept of justice as an irreversible commitment of God in history as articulated in the prophets, the Gospel of Jesus and emergent in liberation theologies in Latin America, Africa, Asia, in North America responses, in feminist responses, and in ecological knowledge, processes and paradigms. Offered yearly.

LAS  331 - Latin American Politics (CD) (4)

An introduction to the major economic, cultural, and institutional factors that shape contemporary Latin American politics, including the role of the United States, the changing international economy and its impact on public policy and political behavior. Offered every other year.

LAS  340 - Panamerican Saints: Hagiography and Politics (4)

This course surveys the lives of saints, both Catholic and "popular," to examine how spirituality and political charisma cross-fertilize in social-justice movements. Includes studies of the Virgin of Guadalupe, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Che Guevara, Diana of Wales, Archbishop Romero, Rev. Jim Jones.

LAS  345 - Religion of U.S. Latinos (CD) (4)

This course surveys the religious life of U.S. Latin@ Catholic, Protestant, and Evangelical/Pentecostal faith communities. It reviews contemporary theological, literary, and sociological writings to understand the ways Latinos construct their faith life, with special attenion to Chican@ faith and activism, and Latina feminism.

LAS  350 - Human Rights and Film (CD) (4)

This course introduces students to the study of human rights issues through film screening, readings, and writing assignments, and by collaborating in the organization of the Human Rights Film Festival at USF. The course is designed around a selcection of both U.S. and foreign documentary and narrative films addressing civil, political, economic, cultural, social, women's and LGBT rights. This course is restricted to those with Junior or Senior standing.

LAS  351 - Divisadero Publication (1 - 4)

The Divisadero is a Latin American Studies newsletter, produced by the students. This newsletter offers an inclusive and critical view of the current issues in Latin America and the Latin@ community in the U.S. by citing the historical, social, and political forces which drive communities across our hemisphere. As a collaborative publication Divisadero shares in its mission to create and strengthen the community of students, faculty, and administrators who share our interests. Divisadero includes articles, interviews, artwork, and videos.

LAS  361 - Brazilian Culture and Society (CD) (4)

This course provides socio-historical approaches to contemporary Brazilian culture and society from a race, class, and gender/sexuality perspective. Case-studies of popular/political cultures, social movements, inequalities and identities illustrate major developments in Brazilian culture and society within the context of democratization and globalization. Offered intermittently.

LAS  363 - Latin American Philosophy (4)

This course is an introduction to philosophy in Latin America, Vasconcelos, Mariategui, Zea, Dussel, etc.) and significant philosophical movements

LAS  365 - CELASA Seminar (4)

Every spring semester this interdisciplinary seminar offers a selected group of students of high academic standing (the CELASA scholars,) the opportunity to study, discuss, experience, and better understand a contemporary Latin American topic. The CELASA Seminar involves either travel to a Latin American country, guest lectures by distinguished Latin American figures in the field of study, or both. Registration by application process only.

LAS  370 - Colonial Latin America (4)

The blending of indigenous, European, and African cultures during the colonial period to form and create Latin America. This survey explores the tensions and richness embedded in this diverse and dynamic history and tracks how colonial attitudes and ideologies shape the region today. Offered every other year.

LAS  371 - Modern Latin America (4)

A survey of Latin America from the late colonial period to the present. Major themes include: political instability, authoritarianism, and the struggle for democracy; economic dependency, underdevelopment, and the search for national sovereignty; social inequality, culture wars, and recent religious transformations. Offered every other year.

LAS  372 - Indigenous and Col Mexico (4)

A comprehensive analysis of the social, political, economic and cultural history of colonial Mexico. Questions of power, identity, gender, race, ethnicity, and popular culture among Mexico's indigenous and colonial societies are central to the class. Course themes focus on pre-colonial societies, patterns of colonization in Northern, Central, and southern Mexico, development of a Spanish-Mexican society and culture, and the process leading to independence from Spain. Offered every other year.

LAS  373 - Modern Mexico (4)

A comprehensive analysis of the social, political, economic and cultural processes that shaped the growth and development of modern Mexico. Questions of power, identity, gender, race, ethnicity, and popular culture are central to the class. Course themes will focus on: nation building; the search for order, stability, industrialization, progress, modern development, popular upheaval, social reform, and national identity. Offered every other year.

LAS  375 - Brazil and Amazonia (4)

Interdisciplinary survey of the geography, culture, and history of Brazil and Amazonia since 1500. Course themes include indigenous cultures, the impact of European expansion on the native people and the land, African and indigenous slavery, colonialism and its legacies, development, extractive economies, and nationalism. Offered every other year.

LAS  376 - Latin American Perspectives (CD) (4)

A social and cultural survey from pre-Columbian roots to the present, focusing on how Latin Americans have shaped their lives within colonial, authoritarian, and paternalistic societies. Offered every semester.

LAS  377 - The Southern Cone (4)

A survey and thematic comparison from the histories of Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Most of the material will date from the last two centuries with some attention given to the colonial period. Course themes include the impact and legacy of colonialism, the process of nation building, militarism and civilian politics, and the significance of women and modernization. Offered intermittently.

LAS  378 - Andean Nations (4)

A survey and thematic comparison of the histories of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela, focusing mostly on the national period. Salient themes include Andean civilizations and cultures, the impact of European colonialism, the process of nation building in multiethnic societies, violence and social change, and the tensions between dictatorship and democracy. Offered every other year.

LAS  379 - Latino/as in the United States (4)

A study of the historical experiences of Mexican Americans/Chicanos, Central Americans, Puerto-Ricans, Cubans and Dominicans, as well as other Latin Americans living in the United States. Topics: identity, prejudice, immigration, social and political experiences, and participation in film, art, music, and other artistic expressions. Offered every other year.

LAS  380 - Latin@s in the U.S. Media (CD) (4)

This course examines the multiple experiences of Latin@ communities in the United States, focusing on media representations within historical, cultural, political, and economic contexts. Students study film, television, the news, advertising, and the music industry. Topics analyzed include stereotypical representations of this group and the development of Latin@ media.

LAS  390 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

LAS  396 - Internship (4 - 8)

LAS  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

LAS  401 - Latin American Seminar (4)

A reading and research seminar focused on specific geographical areas - the Southern Cone, Brazil, the Andean Region, Central America and the Caribbean, Mexico, the Borderlands - or on particular comparative themes relevant to Latin America - Revolution, Religion, Labor and Politics, Women, Race and Class. Offered once per year.

LAS  430 - Undergraduate Seminar in Latin American History (4)

A reading and research seminar focused on specific geographical areas - the Southern Cone, Brazil, the Andean Region, Central America and the Caribbean, Mexico, the Borderlands - or on particular comparative themes relevant to Latin America - Revolution, Religion, Labor and Politics, Women, Race and Class. Offered once per year.

LATN  101 - First Semester Latin (6)

An intensive introduction to phonology, morphology, and syntax supplemented with readings from various Latin authors and simple composition. Offered every Fall.

LATN  102 - Second Semester Latin (6)

Continuation of LATIN 101, with emphasis on reading prose authors, on prose composition, and simple Latin poetry. Offered every Spring.

LATN  201 - Third Semester Latin (4)

Selections from various prose authors and Virgil's Aeneid, I-IV. Offered every Fall.

LATN  202 - Fourth Semester Latin (4)

Selections from Cicero and Ovid. Exercises in composition. Offered intermittently in the Spring.

LATN  398 - Directed Reading and Research (1 - 6)

Offered every semester.

MATH  100 - Great Ideas in Mathematics (4)

Math 100 is an overview of some of the seminal achievements in mathematics from ancient to modern times. Topics include Problem Solving, Number Theory, Geometry, Fractals, Topology, Probability and Statistics, and applications to other fields.

MATH  101 - Elementary Statistics (4)

This course will introduce students to the processes by which valid statistical inferences may be drawn from quantitative data. Topics include design of experiments; sample surveys; measurement; summary and presentation of data; regression and correlation; elementary probability; the law of averages; the central limit theorem; the normal, t and chi-square distributions; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. A computer laboratory component will introduce the student to spreadsheets and statistical applications. Offered every semester.

MATH  102 - Biostatistics (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 104 or sufficiently high score on the Mathematics placement exam (consult with the Mathematics Department for the exact score needed). This course, required of biology majors, is a survey of statistical concepts and methods, with an emphasis on concepts critical to the life sciences. Topics include design of experiments; measurement; summary and presentation of data; regression and correlation; elementary probability; the normal, binomial, t-, and chi-square distributions; confidence intervals and standard error; and hypothesis testing. Offered every Spring.

MATH  103 - Statistics for the Social Sci (4)

This course is a one semester introduction to statistics with an emphasis on techniques and examples in the social sciences.

MATH  104 - Algebra for Business and Science (2)

This course covers mathematical theory and techniques fundamental to university level scholarship. Topics include: the real number system with number theory concepts (algorithms for computation); percentage; simple and compound interest; linear and exponential functions; systems of linear equations; descriptive statistics. Two hours lecture. Offered every semester.

MATH  105 - Mathematics for Educators (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 104 or sufficiently high score on the Mathematics placement exam (consult with the Mathematics Department for the exact score needed) This course provides the requisite mathematics preparation for Multiple Subject Teaching Credential Candidates. The curriculum satisfies the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET) content domain categories: number sense; algebra and functions, measurement and geometry; statistics; data analysis and probability.

MATH  106 - Quantitative Methods in Business (4)

Prerequisites: Sufficiently high score on the Mathematics placement exam (consult with the Mathematics Department for the exact level needed), or MATH - 104. Applied mathematics and statistics taught through the medium of spreadsheets (Excel). Topics include Introduction to Excel; basic algebra for spreadsheet modeling; descriptive statistics; elementary probability theory.

MATH  107 - Calculus for the Liberal Arts (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 104 or sufficiently high score on the Mathematics placement exam (consult with the Mathematics Department for the exact score needed) This course provides a one semester introduction to the theory of differential and integral calculus with an emphasis on technical fundamentals. The curriculum is designed for non-science majors for whom advanced coursework in mathematics is not required.

MATH  108 - Precalculus (4)

Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and sufficiently high score on the Mathematics placement exam (contact the Mathematics Department for the exact level needed), or MATH - 104. Topics include polynomial functions; factor and remainder theorems; complex roots; exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; and coordinate geometry. May not be taken for credit after completion of 0206-109. Offered every semester.

MATH  109 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (4)

Prerequisite: Math 108 or sufficiently high score on the Mathematics placement exam. Differentiation of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions; implicit differentiation; curve sketching; indeterminate forms; velocity and acceleration; optimization; other applications of differentiation; Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, with applications to area and volume. Four hours lecture. Offered every semester.

MATH  110 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 109. Topics include: Techniques of integration, including trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions, and integration by parts; selected applications of integration, including arc length, surface area, and volume; introduction to differential equations; parametric equations and polar coordinates; infinite sequences and series, including Taylor series. Offered every semester.

MATH  190 - Real-World Mathematics: A Service-Learning Math Course (4)

Contemporary society is filled with political, economic and cultural issues that arise from mathematical ideas. This service-learning Core mathematics course will engage students in using mathematics as a tool for understanding their world with a focus on the connection between quantitative literacy and social justice.Topics covered will include financial mathematics, voting theory, data representation and statistics.

MATH  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

MATH  195 - Laboratory (0)

MATH  201 - Discrete Mathematics (4)

Prerequisite: CS 110 and Math 108, or permission of instructor. Topics include algebraic structures, graph theory, combinatorics, and symbolic logic. Offered every Fall.

MATH  202 - Linear Algebra and Probability (4)

Matrix arithmetric and matrix algebra (determinants, adding and multiplying matrices, matrix inverse, using matrices to solve systems of equations), geometric applications of linear algebra (matrices as transformations, vectors in 2- and 3-dimensions, equations of planes, etc.); discrete probability, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions (including binomial and normal), expected value and variance. Offered every Spring.

MATH  211 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 110. Topics include analytic geometry in three dimensions; vector functions; arc length and curvature; motion in space; partial differentiation and chain rule; directional derivative and gradient; optimization and Lagrange multipliers; multiple integrals, line integrals, and surface integrals; divergence and curl; theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Offered every Fall.

MATH  230 - Elementary Linear Algebra (4)

Prerequisites: MATH - 109. Topics include systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants; the geometry of vectors in Euclidean space; general properties of vector spaces, bases and dimension; linear transformations in two and three dimensions, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Offered every Fall.

MATH  235 - Introduction to Formal Methods (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 110. Topics include logic and mathematical proof; set theory, equivalence relations, and mappings; mathematical induction; modular arithmetic; isomorphism; groups; structures of real numbers; convergence and continuity. Emphasis on concepts of proof and mathematical formalism. Offered every Spring.

MATH  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

MATH  295 - Laboratory (0)

MATH  301 - Problem-Solving Seminar (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 110 or permission of instructor. An informal, discussion-oriented class to develop skills for investigating and solving mathematical problems. Topics include elementary mathematics, combinatorics, geometry, number theory and calculus, as well as problems from contests such as the International Mathematical Olympiad and the Putnam Examination. Strongly recommended for students interested in teaching mathematics.

MATH  310 - History of Mathematics (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 110 or permission of instructor. A history of the development of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and calculus. Selected topics from recent mathematical history.

MATH  314 - Mathematical Circles (SL) (4)

An introduction to the Eastern European Mathematical Circles culture. Students will learn mathematical folklore and problem-solving methods drawn from geometry and discrete mathematics, and will both observe and teach students in several mathematical circles in the Bay Area. In addition to the mathematics and pedagogy, students will explore issues of equity in educational opportunity. This is a service earning course designed for math, physics, or computer science majors who are interested in teaching.

MATH  340 - Differential Equations (4)

Prerequisites: MATH - 130 or PHYS - 110 , and MATH - 211 , or permission of instructor. Topics include a review of first-and second-order equations, series solutions, systems of linear and non-linear differential equations, numerical methods, qualitative methods, introduction to partial differential equations.

MATH  345 - Mathematical Modeling (4)

Prerequisites: MATH - 110 and MATH - 130. The methodology of mathematical modeling will be explored in several case studies from fields as diverse as political science, biology, and operations research. Problems of data collection, model fitting, and model analysis will be explored. Case studies incorporate topics from: analysis of conflict (business, military, social), population dynamics, and production management.

MATH  350 - Math Colloquium (1)

This is one semester colloquium course. Students will be exposed to approximately 7 talks over the course of the semester on various topics of interest in modern mathematics. This course is intended for mathematics majors and minors. A student can take up to 2 units of colloquium for credit, but the unit cannot be applied to count for required classes.

MATH  355 - Complex Analysis (4)

Prerequisites: MATH 230 and MATH 211, or permission of instructor. Topics include integration and differentiation of functions of a complex variable, Laurent series, conformal mapping, residues, and Cauchy's theorems.

MATH  367 - Number Theory (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 235 or permission of instructor. Topics include prime numbers, congruences, quadratic reciprocity, number-theoretic functions, and diophantine equations.

MATH  370 - Probability with Applications (4)

Pre-requisite: MATH 211 OR permission of instructor. Topics may include discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions functions; mathematical expectation; joint density functions, law of large numbers; central limit theorem, probability models and applications, stochastic processes, Markov processes.

MATH  380 - Foundations of Geometry (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 110 or permission of instructor. Topics chosen from axiomatics, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, vector spaces and inner products, and symmetry groups.

MATH  394 - Applied Mathematics Research Laboratory (4)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course offers selected upper division students an opportunity to work on a sponsored research project under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Offered as often as suitable projects can be found.

MATH  395 - Selected Topics in Mathematics (2 - 4)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course treats topics not covered in other Mathematics courses, but of interest to faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Offered intermittently.

MATH  398 - Directed Reading and Research (1 - 4)

Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor and dean. May be repeated for credit. Offered every semester.

MATH  422 - Combinatorics (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 235 or permission of instructor.. An in-depth study of combinations and permutations, inclusion-exclusion, the binomial theorem, recurrence relations, and graph theory, with additional topics depending on student and instructor interest (for example, generating functions, combinatorial number theory, finite-state machines). Offered every other Fall.

MATH  435 - Modern Algebra (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 235 or permission of instructor. Topics include an introduction to the theory of groups, rings, fields, vector spaces, and other algebraic structures.

MATH  453 - Real Analysis (4)

Prerequisites: MATH 211 and MATH 235 or permission of instructor. Topics include sequences and series, topology of the real line, limits and continuity, the real number system, the derivative and Riemann integral.

MATH  482 - Differential Geometry (4)

Prerequisite: MATH - 211 or permission of instructor. Topics include classical differential geometry of curves and surfaces, curvature, the bending of surfaces, shortest paths in a surface, and tensors in geometry and physics.

MATH  485 - Topology (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 235 or permission of instructor Topics selected from point-set topology, algebraic topology, geometric topology, and differential topology.

MATH  490 - Numerical Analysis (4)

Prerequisites: CS 112 (grade of C or better) and MATH 202 (grade of C or better). Floating point representation of numbers, error analysis, root finding, interpolation, numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solution of linear systems, numerical solution of differential equations. Four hours lecture.

MS  100 - Introduction to Media Studies (4)

Critical introduction to contemporary issues and debates in media and society. Offered every semester. Applies to Core E. Pre- or corequisite Core A2.

MS  102 - Introduction to Film Studies (4)

This class is designed to introduce students to the world of films from a semiotic, historical and critical perspective. The main objective of the course is to provide students with the formal and rhetorical devices to understand film language in its own terms. Offered every semester. Applies to Core F.

MS  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

MS  200 - Media Institutions (4)

Prerequisite: MS-100. Exploration of political, economic and cultural context of current media institutions including the press, film, TV, and digital media industries in San Francisco, the US and around the world. Focuses on issues of commercialism, the public interest and creativity. Offered every semester.

MS  204 - Media, Stereotyping, and Violence (4)

Qualitative and quantitative approaches to media content and audiences, with special emphasis on violence and stereotyping.

MS  205 - Media Audience and Research (4)

Prerequisite: MS-100. Theory and practice of media and communication research methodologies including content/text analysis, ethnographic methods, interview, and survey methods. Offered every semester.

MS  221 - Audio Production (4)

This introductory course provides students with a basic understanding of audio production for a range of analog and digital platforms. The course focuses on story- telling with sound. Students will learn about current best practices, and develop skills in critique, interviewing, script-writing, editing, and story-pitching; as well as use audio equipment (including microphones and recording devices), field and studio recording, and digital audio editing and mixing. Audio skills gained in this course are relevant for radio, film, video, journalism, and multimedia productions.

MS  222 - Video Production (4)

Prerequisites: MS-100 or MS-102. An introduction to the techniques, aesthetics and practices of video production. Offered every semester. Limited enrollment.

MS  223 - Journalism I: Reporting (4)

An introduction to basic news reporting. Skills emphasized include lead writing, story structure, note-taking and interviewing. Students will be assigned a variety of story types, including the coverage of speeches, press conferences and meetings as well as writing profiles and police and accident stories. Students will be introduced to AP style. Offered every semester. Limited enrollment. Pre- or corequisite Core A2.

MS  224 - Journalism II: Advanced Reporting (4)

Prerequisite: MS 223 or permission of instructor. Advanced news reporting. Research, interviewing, analysis, writing and editing advanced journalism stories. Limited enrollment.

MS  250 - Africa Films Africa (CD) (4)

The diversity of the African continent as seen through the eyes of its filmmakers. Weekly viewings and discussions will be informed by critical literature on African film and its place in the West and the developing world. Cross Listed with: FREN-250.

MS  301 - Green Media (4)

Green Media is an upper division Media Studies production class focused on the topical areas of food, sustainability, and environmental issues. In addition to field research, students will use social and multimedia – Twitter, blogs, audio, photo essays, curating tools, video, reading and writing – to make stories about food and sustainability. 4.0 Credit hours. Pre-requisites: One previous media production course -- MS 221, MS 222, MS 223, MS 224, or MS 320 -- or permission of instructor.

MS  304 - Digital Journalism (4)

Learn to use social media, WordPress, and a variety of hardware and software to report stories in multimedia formats, including audio and video. Learn to publish and promote journalism online, ethical news practices and how to measure and develop audiences. Prereq: MS 223. Counts towards journalism minor.

MS  305 - Advanced Radio Production (4)

Learn to produce program elements for FM and digital radio. Learn about the values and goals of non-commercial educational (NCE) radio in the United States and internationally, as well as best practices of NCE radio, including community involvement and management structures. Course includes field trips and analysis of key political, economic and cultural trends in this sector. Prereq.: MS 221 or permission of instructor.

MS  306 - The Documentary (4)

Prerequisite: MS-102 or MS 200. History and analysis of documentary film and video.

MS  307 - Advanced Radio Production (4)

This class will build upon production skills learned in Audio Production 1. Students will learn the values and goals of non-commercial educational (NCE) radio in the United States and internationally, and will be introduced to the financial, programming, staffing and community relations of NCE radio stations. Students will have the opportunity to practice these skills in the operations of KUSF.org, as well as producing independent audio projects of their choosing. In addition, students will learn about other contemporary audio production genres, distribution platforms and opportunities and the basics of their technical operations, such as live radio, podcasting, webhosting, and streaming. Prerequisite: MS 221

MS  311 - Communication Law and Policy (4)

Prerequisite: MS-200. Social and legal dilemmas over communication resources, rights and responsibilities. Analysis of law and policy as responses to social conflicts surrounding communication practices. Some topics covered include the First Amendment, media ownership, intellectual property, advertising, obscenity and hate speech. Offered every Spring.

MS  312 - The Popular Arts (4)

An introduction to the study of popular culture that is interdisciplinary in its approach. Popular culture is understood here to mean those areas of cultural production and consumption made and consumed by mass publics. The overview of issues offered in this class is not intended to be comprehensive; rather its goal is to establish a new framework for thinking about culture and the arts generally, and in relation to popular culture in particular. Particular emphasis is placed on an overview of aesthetic theory in relation to the history and philosophy of art, which is then applied systematically to case studies in contemporary media culture.

MS  313 - Media Theory and Criticism (4)

Prerequisite: MS 205. Social and cultural theory of media and communications applied to analysis of media events and texts. Application of research methods and strategies to analyse media content.

MS  315 - Telenovelas/Soap Operas (4)

A survey of the soap opera and melodrama genre focusing on its Latino version: telenovelas. The course looks at the production, distribution, and content of soaps, and their audiences around the world. It explores questions of class, gender, race and ethnicity, and the use of soaps for education and social change.

MS  317 - Latin American Cinema (CD) (4)

Prerequisite: MS 102 or MS 200. This course introduces students to films made by Latin American filmmakers about Latin America. It offers the chance to explore how the national cinemas of the Americas portray their societies' experiences. Topics covered include: relations between cinema and the state, questions of ideology, national identity, class, race and ethnicity, gender, concerns about historical representations and political memory, and the use of film as a tool for social change and human rights education. Cross Listed with: LAS-317.

MS  318 - Indian Cinema (4)

Prerequisite: MS 102 or MS 200. Examines the institutions, texts, and audiences of the National ("Bollywood") and regional cinemas of India in the postcolonial context.

MS  319 - LGBT Cinema (4)

Prerequisite: MS 102 or MS 200. This course explores and analyzes Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender cinema from the 1920s to the present. We will consider how LGBT cinematic traditions have been shaped by key historical factors, such as the Motion Picture Code in 1930, the rise of fascism in Europe, the HUAC hearings of the 1950s, the women's movement, the gay liberation movement, and the AIDS crisis.

MS  320 - Digital Media Production (4)

Prerequisite: MS 200. Digital Media Production is a course designed around creating, sharing, and collaborating with digital media. Students will make digital media using platforms like facebook, twitter, flickr, yelp, blogs, google maps, transmedia, and kiva. By the end of the semester, students will learn how to use digital media creatively and effectively, how to use digital media collectively and collaboratively, and how to learn new tools quickly and independently.

MS  322 - Media Production III: Advanced Production (4)

Prerequisites: MS 222 or permission of Film Studies director.

MS  323 - Publication Editing and Design (4)

Prerequisite: MS 224 or permission of instructor. Basic editing and design techniques for print and web publications. Emphasis on editing for grammar, spelling, usage and Associated press style, plus an introduction to the principles of page layout. Limited enrollment.

MS  325 - Feature Writing (4)

Prerequisite: MS 223 or permission of instructor. Students produce typical feature/magazine stories, such as the process story, the trend story, the travel story and both the short and long profile, with a concentration on the techniques of narrative and characterization used in so-called literary journalism. Limited enrollment.

MS  327 - Media Production III: Scriptwriting (4)

Prerequisites: MS 102 and MS 222 or permission of instructor. This course trains students to write a full-feature script. By viewing films and reading scripts of already produced films, students will become familiar with the narrative and dramatic structures of diverse film scripts. The course involves a considerable amount of film viewing, as well as workshops in writing, collective critiques of classmates' works and weekly writing assignments.

MS  328 - Photojournalism (4)

Prerequisite: MS 223 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the philosophies, techniques and methods of photojournalism for newspaper, magazine and Internet. From basic photography to hands-on digital imaging. Includes social context and ethics of photojournalism.

MS  329 - Arts Report/Review (4)

Prerequisite: MS 223 or permission of instructor. This course is divided into two sections, reporting and reviewing. Because solid reporting is the foundation for credible reviewing, we will spend the first half of the semester on reporting. We will focus on five genres: music, movies, theater, food and one to be determined. In addition to covering and reviewing events, we will meet with a series of arts writers and discuss various aspects of arts reporting and criticism for popular audiences. Class provides a chance for students to strengthen their reporting skills and fine tune their writing voices. Limited enrollment.

MS  330 - Media Production III: Documentary Production (4)

Prerequisites: MS 100 or MS 102 and MS 222. This course delves into strategies and techniques involved in making documentary films and videos. Students will produce several short documentaries that demonstrate their understanding of the non-fiction genre.

MS  331 - Media Production III: Narrative Fiction/Film Production (4)

Prerequisites: MS 100 or MS 102 and MS 222. Aiming at the production of narrative shorts as final projects, in this course students will become familiar with the different stages involved in completing a film project: from the writing of the film, through the actual shooting and production components, to the visual and sound editing of the project. Students will work in 16mm and 8mm film formats, but have also the option to shoot their projects in video formats. Offered every Fall. Limited enrollment.

MS  335 - Feminist Thought (4)

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. An introduction to a variety of feminist theories and approaches with emphasis on the arts, philosophy, politics, and media. Offered every Spring. Cross Listed with: ENGL 335 and PHIL 335.

MS  340 - Media Production III: Experimental Cinema (4)

Prerequisites: MS 100 or MS 102 and MS 222. Students will learn an abundance of experimental filmmaking strategies by exploring the rich history of low budget, do-it-yourself, avant-garde filmmaking. Each student will create several films that incorporate the learned techniques.

MS  350 - Human Rights and Film (CD) (4)

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. This course introduces students to the study of human rights issues through film screening, readings, and writing assignments, and by collaborating in the organization of the Human Rights Film Festival at USF. The course is designed around a selcection of both U.S. and foreign documentary and narrative films addressing civil, political, economic, cultural, social, women's and LGBT rights.

MS  380 - Latin@s in the U.S. Media (CD) (4)

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. This course examines the multiple experiences of Latin@ communities in the United States, focusing on media representations within historical, cultural, political, and economic contexts. Students study film, television, the news, advertising, and the music industry. Topics analyzed include stereotypical representations of this group and the development of Latin@ media.

MS  390 - Special Topics in Media Studies (4)

Topics and prerequisites vary by semester.

MS  395 - Media Workshop (SL) (1 - 4)

Prerequisite: MS-200. Faculty-supervised on-campus media production workshop including opportunities with KUSF, The Foghorn, USFtv, and other USF media outlets. Offered every semester.

MS  396 - Media Internship (SL) (1 - 4)

Prerequisite: MS 200. Faculty-supervised off-campus internship. Offered every semester.

MS  397 - Directed Project (1 - 4)

Prerequisite: Completion of 200-level requirements. Faculty supervised production project. Requires written permission of instructor, chair, and dean.

MS  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Prerequisite: Completion of 200-level requirements. Faculty supervised research project. Requires written permission of instructor, chair, and dean.

MS  400 - Politics and the Media (4)

Prerequisite: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. An in-depth investigation of the relationship between politics and the news media in the U.S., emphasizing the role of news in democracy and in public policy formation. Cross-listed with Politics department.

MS  403 - Race, Ethnicity, and Media (CD) (4)

Prerequisite: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. A survey of the relationship between diverse racial/ethnic groups and the media within the context of the United States. It explores representation and diversity in popular media, racial equity in media industries, and ethnic minorities as audiences and as independent producers.

MS  405 - Gender and the Media (4)

Prerequisite: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. Examination of feminist theories and analytical practices for understanding images of gender in media and of cultural formation of gender and sexuality through representation.

MS  407 - Alternative Media and Social Change (4)

Prerequisite: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. Investigation into the content, practices and politics of alternative and community-based media and social change communications practices in US and internationally. Students will conduct fieldwork in San Francisco.

MS  409 - International/Global Media (4)

Prerequisite: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. Analysis of structures and content of international media and role of culture in globalization.

MS  410 - Popular Music and Communication (4)

Prerequisite: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. Aesthetics, economics and history of Anglo-American popular music and relationship of pop music to mass media, including radio, film and television. Students will produce a 30-page paper over the course of the semester that comprehensively investigates the history, economics, aesthetics and conditions of consumption of one album/CD/mixtape of their own choosing.

MS  411 - Popular Culture Studies (4)

Prerequisite: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. Seminars vary by semester.

MS  412 - Media, Memory, History (4)

Prerequisites: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. This seminar explores how communities write their history and memories and the role that the media play in this process. Students look at the social construction of memories, their trans-generational transmission, and their representation in a variety of media that include television, magazines, film, music, monuments and memorials. Requirement: Senior standing.

MS  414 - Undoing Gender (4)

This course investigates the ways in which some popular culture -- especially speculative, queer, feminist, and trans cultural work -- has critiqued, challenged, or revised conventional understandings of genders and sexualities. We investigate key historical and contemporary texts (novels, films, performing art) in which people have reimagined the meanings of gender.

MS  420 - American Journalism Ethics (4)

Prerequisite: MS-224. This course is the capstone in the Journalism minor, and students should review its prerequisites before signing up for it. In it students will explore the historical development of the First Amendment in the United States and then consider the dilemmas that arise in contemporary journalism when reporters attempt to reconcile the idea that freedom of the press should be absolute with the limitations, both legal and ethical, that many would place on news gathering and newswriting. The course will not propose easy answers to these difficult questions. The emphasis will be on promoting ethical awareness and developing a process for tackling such questions. Offered every Fall.

MS  490 - Honors Seminar in Media Studies (4)

Prerequisite: MS 311 or MS 313 or permission of instructor. This is a capstone course for selected senior Media Studies students in which they will research a significant Media Studies problem and produce an Undergraduate Honors Thesis in Media Studies.

MUS  0 - Jazz and Blues Theory (2)

MUS  100 - Musicianship and Principles of Tonal Theory (4)

An intensive course on musicianship and theory. Its goal is to develop a foundation in the theory and practice of music. It covers notation, ear-training, scales and modes, intervals, triads, seventh chords, chord progressions, melody, rhythm and form. It also includes basic principles of counterpoint and analysis. Written exercises are required weekly.

MUS  101 - Music Appreciation (4)

A general introduction to the history and genres of music as these developed in Europe and America from the Middle Ages through the 20th Century.

MUS  110 - Choir (0 - 2)

Credit earned by singing in one of the choral ensembles on campus and performing in end-of-semester concerts. For details on the various groups see www.usfca.edu/artsci/pa/music_minor. Sections available include: USF Classical Choral Ensembles, Gospel Choir, ASUSF Voices, and St. Ignatius Choir.

MUS  111 - Instrumental Ensemble (0 - 2)

Credit earned by performing in one of the instrumental ensembles on campus. Sections available: Jazz Ensemble, Latin American Music Ensemble, USF Dons Pep Band. For details on the various groups see www.usfca.edu/artsci/pa/music_minor.

MUS  120 - Voice Lessons (2)

Credit earned by taking voice lessons, preparing repertoire appropriate to the student's level, taking part in the midterm evaluations ("juries") and participating in some form (performer or crew) in the Music Student Showcase.

MUS  121 - Guitar Lessons (2)

Credit earned by taking guitar lessons, preparing repertoire appropriate to the student's level, taking part in the midterm evaluations ("juries") and participating in some form (performer or crew) in the Music Student Showcase.

MUS  122 - Piano Lessons (2)

Credit earned by taking piano lessons, preparing repertoire appropriate to the student's level, taking part in the midterm evaluations ("juries") and participating in some form (performer or crew) in the Music Student Showcase.

MUS  123 - Violin and Viola Lessons (2)

Credit earned by taking violin or viola lessons, preparing repertoire appropriate to the student's level, taking part in the midterm evaluations ("juries") and participating in some form (performer or crew) in the Music Student Showcase.

MUS  124 - Woodwinds Lessons (2)

Credit earned by taking flute, oboe or piccolo lessons, preparing repertoire appropriate to the student's level, taking part in the midterm evaluations ("juries") and participating in some form (performer or crew) in the Music Student Showcase.

MUS  160 - Body in Performance Alexander Technique (2)

Careers in music are often accompanied by physical problems such as back pain, tendinitis and repetitive stress injuries. The Alexander Technique is an educational process that helps musicians use their "primary instrument"- mind and body- without strain and excessive tension. All the basic principles of the Technique will be covered and all students will participate in applying the Technique to performance and counteracting stage fright and nervousness. No pre-requisite, required of PASJ majors with Music Concentration.

MUS  180 - Music and Social History (4)

This course looks at the relationship between music and social justice. Using case studies from different historical times and different parts of the world we will examine how musicians create and perform music both in reaction to the social environment and to change it. Required for PASJ majors with music concentration, and Music Minors, or by permission of instructor.

MUS  195 - (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

MUS  200 - Studies in Popular Music (4)

This survey course offers a general introduction to the most influential popular music styles in the United States from 1850 to the present. The approach is interdisciplinary, but the focus is on analyzing music sounds alongside historical studies. Popular music styles will be culturally situated, analyzed for their role in broader social and political movements, technological advances and engagement with mass media and commercial industries.

MUS  202 - Jazz, Culture and Social Justice (4)

This course presents an overview of the history of jazz music, both in terms of the imporant stylistic innovations in its musical forms and of the cultural impact that musicians have had on contemporary United States. We consider jazz music and its performance as a cultural practice, assessing its importance for its political efficacy and as a tool to promote social change and expose social injustices, while simultaneously celebrating individual achievements and empowering participants.

MUS  203 - Music and Social Protest (CD) (4)

Music can be a vehicle for social change and singing songs can comment on as well as affect changes within society. Using multicultural case studies from the US and Latin America, we consider how musicians and activists use musical sounds and performance practices as tools to empower people. The class contains a historical survey/lecture component and a performance lab component (no prior musical experience required).

MUS  210 - Music of the Americas (CD) (4)

This introductory survey course explores the sounds, history, modes of engagement, circulation, and political and social aspects of influential transnational music styles found throughout "the Americas", including music from North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Students examine the cross-cultural interactions that led to the creation of the music we study, and enhance their listening skills with the help of readings and class discussions.

MUS  211 - Asian Musical Cultures (CD) (4)

This introductory survey course explores different musical forms and genres from various Asian cultures, as well as contemporary music made by Asian Americans. Students will attend concerts, develop listening skills, and investigate these musics' aesthetics, meanings, and sociological contexts.

MUS  212 - Survey of African Music (CD) (4)

This introductory survey course provides students with an overview of phenomenal richness of Africa's musical and rhythmic landscape. We examine the impact of a rapidly changing technological world and its influence on the traditional musics of Africa, as well as the sociocultural implications of such changes.

MUS  213 - Music of Brazil (4)

This course explores some of the more prominent music styles of Brazil. These styles will be introduced to students through the exploration of musical sounds, aesthetics, performance practices and contextualized within the distinctive socio-political moments of emergence and the role they play in articulating multiple identities and senses of belonging.

MUS  215 - Filipino Music and Theology (2)

Filipino Music and Theology investigates the numerous ways in which music is embedded in the world—particularly its influence on spirituality and society as a whole. The course delves into the intersections of music with the fields of philosophy, religious studies, and sociology. It also explores various musical traditions in the Philippines and the Filipino diaspora, while the class collaborates in rigorous discussion, analysis, and performance of these musical traditions and how they correlate with the course’s theories.

MUS  222 - Romantic Piano Music (4)

An exploration of the romantic literature for the piano through dozens of short pieces by Chopin, Liszt, Brahms and Clara Schumann, Felix and Fanny Mendelssohn and others. We will also discuss the romantic movement in general and issues such as the role of the artist in society and of women composers and performers.

MUS  230 - Introduction to Opera (4)

Opera is a singular genre, one involving multiple art forms (literature/acting/dance/set design/costumes, etc.). This survey course introduces students to the history and development of the operatic genre. Class meetings include discussions of staging and directing, reception and social implications. Students attend at least three live concerts as part of the course work. No prerequisite except intellectual curiosity and propensity to enjoy learning something new.

MUS  231 - Music and Gender (4)

This course explores how gender roles have influenced composers, performers, and listeners of Western music from the Middle Ages to the present. We will look at case studies including operas that featured castrati and women dressed as men. We will discuss women composers who worked in both traditional and avant-garde styles. We will also examine popular genres such as blues and disco and artists like David Bowie and Lady Gaga.

MUS  232 - Mozart's Greatest Operas (4)

In-depth study of selected operas composed by W. A. Mozart (Don Giovanni, The Marriage of Figaro, Cosi fan tutte and The Magic Flute). Each opera is examined within the context of its creation and reception in 18th century Vienna, is scrutinized for how issues of gender and class are presented on stage. Students learn about opera as a genre, its social role and implications, and the methods to analyze plots and musical forms of individual works, to consider how music changes our understanding of the text or how singing differs from speech.

MUS  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

MUS  300 - Music Theory I (4)

An intensive course in diatonic harmony, including ear training, four-part writing, and analysis of phrase, melody, and simple forms. Excerpts for analysis are taken from the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic literature. A placement test will be administered on the first day of class.

MUS  301 - History of Western Art Music (4)

Prerequisite is MUS 301 or instructor's permission. An in-depth study of European Art Music within its historic, social, political, and economic environment, with emphasis placed on analysis of representative pieces of all eras and genres. Secular and sacred, vocal and instrumental music from the origins of notation in the 9th century to the present time.

MUS  303 - Music and Art (4)

Examination of the development of art and music within the Western tradition from the Middle Ages to the present through the study of representative figures. Focuses on the direction of changes as seen in the work of a few major artists and musicians. Offered Fall.

MUS  305 - Anthropology of Music (CD) (4)

This course introduces students to ethnomusicology, the study of music using anthropological methods, using case studies of music from selected traditions from around the world. We will explore various modes of engagement with music by analyzing academic texts, doing in-class listening and performance labs, and participating in fieldwork research in the SF Bay Area.

MUS  310 - Advanced Western Theory (2)

An intensive course in chromatic harmony, covering analysis, ear training, four-part writing (figured bass and harmonization), modulation and larger forms (rondo, sonata, and fugue). Music for analysis is chosen primarily from the Classical, Romantic, and Modern literature.

MUS  311 - Songwriting (2)

A course primarily for PASJ major/Music concentrators and Music Minors, or by permission of instructor. Students will study and learn to write songs in different genres and styles, specifically the art of writing lyrics and the practical application of setting words to music with harmony, melody and rhythm. Students will work to develop and expand their unique songwriting “voice” by composing at least two original songs during the semester.

MUS  312 - Introduction to Music Technology (2)

In this course students learn about sound and the computer, investigating established principles of computer audio such as synthesis techniques, sound sampling, digital signal processing, file formats and audio processing. Applications of digital audio for video will also be included.

MUS  313 - Choral Arranging (2)

MUS  314 - Jazz and Blues Theory (4)

A course primarily for PASJ majors/Music concentrators and Music Minors, or by permission of instructor. This class introduces the language of jazz, blues and related popular music styles. Through written analytical and aural work, students will learn jazz scales/modes, construct basic chord progressions, apply common rhythms and forms (e.g. 12-bar blues or 32-bar popular song), create and interpret lead sheets, and explore basic principles of improvisation.

MUS  320 - Conducting (2)

Students receive hands-on training in the basic skills needed to conduct ensembles performing music from Western Art music traditions, including: baton technique, non-verbal communication methods, commonly used terminology, and score reading/interpretation. Prerequisite is MUS 300 or instructor's permission.

MUS  390 - Special Topics in Western Art Music (1 - 4)

One-time offerings of special interest courses in music.

MUS  391 - Seminar in Non-Western Music (4)

A course for PASJ majors with a Music Concentration. This seminar will cover one particular topics of Non-Western Music every time it is offered. Examples may include music of one particular cultural and geographic area (the Andes, Sub-Saharan Africa) or a particular tradition.

MUS  392 - Seminar in Western Art Music (4)

Prerequisite is MUS 301 or instructor's permission. A course for PASJ majors with a Music Concentration. This seminar will cover one particular topic every time it is offered. Examples may include Romanticism in Music, The Symphony from 1780-1880, Reformation and Counter-Reformation Music, Baroque Oratorio and Cantara, etc.

MUS  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

MUS  480 - Senior Project (4)

Required for all PASJ majors, this is the final course in the major where students will develop an individual or collective project in their area of concentration.

PASJ  130 - Dance Studio: The Craft (4)

Intensive study in the rudiments of the dancer's vocabulary and craft, with intensive instruction in movement in order to develop range of motion, strength, coordination, balance, centering, while learning to care for the body.

PASJ  160 - Body in Perf: Alexander Tech (2)

Careers in music are often accompanied by physical problems such as back pain, tendinitis and repetitive stress injuries. The Alexander Technique is an educational process that helps musicians use their "primary instrument"- mind and body- without strain and excessive tension. All the basic principles of the Technique will be covered and all students will participate in applying the Technique to performance and counteracting stage fright and nervousness. No pre-requisite, required of PASJ majors with Music Concentration.

PASJ  161 - Body in Performance: Laban (1 - 2)

This course provides an introduction to Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals and their applications to movement description, observation, and execution. Students in all artistic disciplines will develop physical approaches to their training that address core support, postural concerns, injury prevention and rehabilitation. Through the cultivation of a vital, conscious relationship with one's body, dancers, actors and musicians will become aware of personal movement patterns that help and/or hinder expressive potential.

PASJ  171 - Production and Design I (2)

Production and Design I focuses on the design, technical, and managerial elements that are essential to the presentation of any performance. These include lighting, sound and multi-media components, as well as management and organizational structure. In this course, students will learn about the history of stage technologies, as well as their contemporary applications, with an emphasis on innovation and the self-producing artist.

PASJ  172 - Production and Design II (4)

This experiential course, required for Performing Arts and Social Justice Majors with a Theater Concentration and an elective for Theater Minors, focuses on the design, technical, and managerial elements that are essential to the presentation of any performance. Topics include: lighting, sound and multi-media for the stage, as well as stage-management and producing organizational structures. Students will learn about the history of stage technologies, as well as their contemporary applications, with an emphasis on innovation and the self-producing artist.

PASJ  180 - Music and Social History (4)

This course looks at the relationship between music and social justice. Using case studies from different historical times and different parts of the world we will examine how musicians create and perform music both in reaction to the social environment and to change it. Required for PASJ majors with music concentration, and for Music Minors.

PASJ  181 - Dance and Social History (4)

Dance, like all of the arts, is a product of the culture in which it is created. Social and political climates, cultural values, and issues of personal identity create the framework within which all dance artists create their work. Throughout history, dancers and choreographers have responded to their cultural contexts in more or less conscious ways. Many have used the craft of choreography to give a voice and/or visibility to ideas, issues or populations that directly challenge the attitudes of their communities. This has manifested itself in many ways as dance has evolved as a presence in our culture. This course will use the history of Western concert dance as a means for exploring these connections in greater depth. Particular focus will be paid to the history of ballet, jazz and modern dance and the principle figures of these fields whose work has impacted the ways we think about dance as an agent for activism, artistic innovation and change.

PASJ  182 - Theater and Social History (4)

This course studies the role that theater and theater artists have played in creating a "safe space" for engaging relevant social issues affecting communities throughout time. With a focus on western traditions it looks at performance as part of processes of social consciousness and transformation. Required for PASJ majors with theater concentration, and for Theater minors.

PASJ  280 - Contemp Perf. Practices (COPP) (4)

Prerequisite: PASJ 180-series. This required course for all Performing Arts and Social Justice majors will investigate the role of the artist in contemporary society. Through case studies of notable contemporary performance artists, students will critically examine the aesthetic, social, and political value systems within which artists create their work. Within this context, students will learn to recognize their own belief systems, thereby adopting an approach to art-making that is driven by cultural consciousness and personal choice.

PASJ  369 - Workshop in Dance Production (1 - 4)

PASJ  380 - Performing Arts and Community Exchange (4)

This course is designed for students who are interested in merging social activism, dance/theater and teaching. Students will learn how to use movement and theater as tools for social change in settings such as senior centers, schools and prisons. In studio sessions, students will identify, approach and construct classes for community sites. Selected films and readings will provide a context for discussion and assist in the development of individual student's research and teaching methods. The class will include lab sessions at designated off-camps sites where students will lead and participate in teaching workshops.

PASJ  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

PASJ  480 - Senior Project (2)

Required for all PASJ majors, this is the final course in the major where students will develop an individual or collective project in their area of concentration. Depending on your concentration (Dance, Music, Theater) you may enroll in a different section. See you advisor for guidance on specific projects before enrolling in this class.

PASJ  480 - Laboratory (0)

PHIL  110 - Great Philosophical Questions (4)

An Introduction to classic texts of philosophy, focused on major philosophical issues including the problem of knowledge, the existence of God, the mystery of evil, free choice vs. determinism, and the essence of human nature. Offered every semester.

PHIL  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

PHIL  202 - Philosophy of Religion (4)

What counts as a "religion"? Must it affirm the existence of God? What do most people and cultures seem to mean by "God"? Can the existence of God be demonstrated? Is it reasonable to believe God exists? Can God's existence be reconciled with human freedom and with the existence of evil? The course takes up these and related questions, ponders the answers given by classical and contemporary thinkers, and discusses them. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  203 - Social and Political Philosophy (4)

This course will examine significant philosophical contributions to an understanding of politics and society. Among the questions it will address are: What is the nature and basis of the state? Which form of government is best? How do we determine whether political institutions are just? What conceptions of human nature underlie various political philosophies? The course will draw from classical, modern, and contemporary sources in political philosophy. Offered every year.

PHIL  204 - Philosophy of Science (4)

A critical examination of conflicting interpretations of scientific practice. Major issues include the nature of scientific explanation, the development of instrumentation and experimental techniques, how scientific knowledge is validated, whether theories are to be interpreted as literally true or as instrumentally adequate, scientific revolutions, and the rationality of science. Offered every year.

PHIL  205 - Philosophy of Biology (4)

This course engages in a philosophical reflection of evolutionary theory and the theory of the gene. Among questions we will address are: Why is intelligent design not as good of a theory of species origin as evolution? Is it possible to hold a rational belief in Christianity and in evolutionary theory? Do genes determine human behavior? Does biology just reduce to chemistry and physics? Offered every year.

PHIL  208 - Liberation Philosophy (4)

Using primary sources, the course will address the questions of the nature of philosophy and reason in a post-colonial, post-modern, and multi-cultural world. The course focuses on philosophies of liberation from eurocentrism, racism, and colonialism from a variety of historical and geopolitical spaces. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  209 - Aesthetics (4)

Traditional and contemporary theories of art and aesthetic experience; a study of selected problems in philosophy of art. Offered every semester to students in the Art and Architecture and Performing Arts and Social Justice majors.

PHIL  211 - Ancient Philosophy (4)

This course studies texts in ancient philosophy, from the Presocratics to Hellenistic philosophy, and has a special focus on the writings of Plato and Aristotle. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  220 - Asian Philosophy (4)

This course examines the historical development and contemporary debates of some of the main philosophical traditions of Asia. The topics include metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical questions raised in Hindu, Buddhist, and Confucianist philosophies. References will also be made to the larger cultural and political issues that are relevant in these traditions today. Offered every year.

PHIL  225 - Prisons and Punishment (SL) (4)

In this course, students will examine philosophical justifications for punishment, the morality of incarceration, and the genealogy of what recently has been called the "prison-industrial complex." As a Service Learning course, students will volunteer with organizations dedicated to improving the health and welfare of inmates in California prisons. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  230 - Philosophy of Human Person (4)

This course is oriented around the questions “What am I?” and “How should I live?” and explores the answers that both historical and contemporary philosophers have given. Topics include the immortality and nature of the soul, death, the distinction between body and mind, the relational and social aspects of the self, free will, the nature of emotion, and the goals of human life. Offered every semester.

PHIL  231 - (4)

This course surveys classic and contemporary African American philosophy, and includes such figures as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Davis, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Frantz Fanon. It considers the relation of this work to major topics of Western philosophy, from the social contract theory to existentialism to cosmopolitanism. Starting from the lived experiences of blacks in the New and Old World, this course takes up key issues and problems in the history of the modern world: theories of nationalism, identity, solidarity, and responses to injustice and domination.

PHIL  240 - Ethics (4)

This course critically analyzes ethical arguments and various positions on contemporary ethical issues. The course will be composed of three focus areas: Ethical Theory, Social Issues, and Ethics of Everyday life. Approximately one-third of the course will be devoted to each area. Some sections focus on more specific ethical issues, such as Business Issues, Environmental Issues, Bio-medical Issues, and Legal Issues, and are so designated in the Course Schedule. Offered every semester.

PHIL  241 - Ethics: Service Learning (SL) (4)

This course critically analyzes ethical arguments and various positions on contemporary ethical issues. The Service Learning component provides concrete experience as students work with organizations dedicated to ameliorating the causes and effects of poverty, racism, gender inequality, and other social ills. Offered every semester.

PHIL  242 - Latin American Philosophy (CD) (4)

This course introduces students to the major figures and movements in the five hundred year history of philosophical production in Latin America. Along the way, we will examine many of the major themes in Latin American philosophy: human nature, race and personal identity, knowledge, freedom, liberation, colonialism, and perhaps most significantly, what it means to do philosophy. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  251 - Mind, Freedom and Knowledge (4)

An examination of three central questions in philosophy: What is the nature of the mind? Do we have free will? How can we know anything at all? Texts by current and historical philosophers. Offered every semester.

PHIL  252 - Plato (4)

Alfred North Whitehead famously said that all Western Philosophy was "a footnote to Plato." He introduces most of its important questions, and many of his answers to them are still being debated. What is courage, friendship, virtue? Can the latter be taught? What is justice and the most just state? Can it realistically be achieved, and, if so, how? Is the truth of all values and statements relative to the ones who holds them or is there an objective standard by which these should be judged? If so, what is it? We will examine these and other questions through an investigation and discussion of Plato's dialogues. Offered every year.

PHIL  253 - Problems in Democracy (4)

An introduction to the philosophy of democratic government. The importance of articulating such a philosophy will be cast in terms of current challenges to democratic society, such as multiculturalism, postmodernism, and the problem of determining the meaning of the Constitution posed by abortion and physician-assisted suicide and same-sex marriage. Offered every year.

PHIL  255 - Philosophy of Education (4)

An introduction to philosophy that emphasizes classic and contemporary ideas that ground the theoretical foundation of educational theory, focusing on broad philosophical questions rather than education policy issues. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  256 - Existentialism (4)

This course is an inquiry into the meaning of human existence with particular emphasis on the self. The course encourages inquiry into the meaning of our experience with absurdity, alienation, anxiety, freedom, God, and being. Direction for thinking about these issues is provided by philosophers such as Nietzsche, Sartre, Kierkegaard, Camus, Dostoevsky, and Heidegger. Through reading, discussion, and reflection students come to understand where they believe the meaning of human existence is located. Offered every semester.

PHIL  266 - The Human Animal (4)

By comparing and contrasting animal and human existence, this course seeks to question the boundaries between animal and human existence as well as to discuss the responsibility we might have towards non-human animals. Historically the course covers the philosophers from Ancient Greece (Aristotle), Medieval Philosophy (Aquinas), Modern Philosophy (Descartes and Kant) to contemporary philosophy (Merleau-Ponty, Singer and Nagel). The course includes major philosophical issues such as questions of selfhood, being, rationality, language, as well as moral questions. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  275 - Asian Amer Philosophy (CD) (4)

This course examines the nature of self and society within the context of Asian American experience broadly conceived. Western and Asian philosophies will be used to consider such topics as the nature of the examined life, happiness, justice, and social transformation. In addition, various 20th century Asian American issues will be considered, such as race, gender, class, modernity, U.S. imperialism, Asian anti-colonialism, immigration, and citizenship. Offered every year. Offered every year.

PHIL  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

PHIL  299 - Writing on Great Philosophical Questions (4)

A writing intensive (WI) introduction to the classic texts of philosophy, focused on great philosophical issues such as the freedom of the will, the immortality of the soul, and the existence of God. Upon completion of three WI courses, students receive a certificate in writing and rhetoric. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  307 - Philosophy of Art (4)

Using a multimedia and historical approach, this class offers an introduction to the different theories of art that have shaped the Western Tradition. Class meetings will be organized around readings dealing with theories of the beautiful, slide presentations that will give students a sense of the works being produced, and, when appropriate, music.

PHIL  310 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This course follows the development of Greek philosophical thought from the Pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers and then tracks these lines of thought to medieval times. Because of the central importance of their ideas, the writings of Plato and Aristotle will be given special attention. Offered every Fall.

PHIL  312 - Modern Philosophy (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. Revolutionary changes in science and politics from the 16th century onwards reconstituted central issues in what is now called Modern Philosophy. This course focuses on knowledge and political community in the works of Descartes, Hobbes, Hume and Kant, among others. Offered every Spring.

PHIL  315 - Ethics for Majors (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This is an ethics course for majors and minors in philosophy. It provides a foundation and orientation for their other electives in this area and a common set of reference terms. It addresses central ethical issues through consideration of historical and contemporary philosophers. Offered every Spring.

PHIL  316 - Philosophy of Knowledge (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. A seminar study of classical and contemporary theories of knowledge. Topics include the nature of knowledge, skepticism, perception, theories of justification, a priori knowledge, theories of truth, with close attention given to moderate realism and its relation to contemporary epistemology.

PHIL  317 - Philosophy of Emotion (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This course examines the nature, value, and complexity of emotion. Topics may include: the relation between emotion and reason, the justifiability of negative emotions, the relation between emotion and social practices, and the roles of philosophy and science in the study of emotion.

PHIL  319 - Logic (4)

This course emphasizes contemporary symbolic logic. We will study deductive logical systems and learn how to evaluate arguments with both truth-tables and proofs in propositional and predicate logic. We will also learn how to translate ordinary language arguments into a formal symbolic language and back again. Offered every year.

PHIL  322 - Modal Logic and Metaphysics (4)

This course is an exploration of the major systems of modal logic for the purpose of studying contemporary topics in analytic metaphysics, such as, but not limited to, ontological arguments for the existence of God, the nature of time, the possibility of time travel, fictional objects, and identity. Prerequisites: First-order logic with a C- or above, or instructor approval. Offered every other year.

PHIL  325 - Metaphysics (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. A study of metaphysical systems and theories from ancient Greece to the twentieth century. Topics include metaphysical inquiry and method, the nature of metaphysical discourse, representative schools and metaphysical issues, such as being, essence and existence, personhood, knowledge, freedom, and God.

PHIL  328 - Kant (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. A study of the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, with readings from his major works in metaphysics and epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, and politics.

PHIL  329 - 19th Century Philosophy (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This course studies one of the most diverse periods in the history of philosophy. It included post-Kantian thinkers (such as Hegel) who have an absolute faith in reason and who attempt to build complete all-encompassing philosophical systems. Out of these systems Marx’s theory arises. On the other side of the spectrum we find the collapse of reason in nihilists such as Schopenhauer and Nietzsche.

PHIL  330 - Philosophy Symposium (1 - 2)

A variable topic course, based on the study of a figure or topic in the history of Philosophy. May be offered in conjunction with SII 330 - St Ignatius Institute Symposium; may be taken repeated times for credit. Prerequisite: Majors and minors only.

PHIL  335 - Feminist Thought (4)

An introduction to a variety of feminist theories and approaches with emphasis on the arts, philosophy, politics, and media. Offered every Spring. Cross Listed With: MS - 335.

PHIL  339 - Moral Psychology (4)

This course focuses on the psychological states and social conditions involved in moral judgment, practices, and attitudes. Topics may include moral motivation, praise and blame, the nature of moral reasons, the nature of the virtues (and whether we have them), and forms of agency (such as childhood, psychopathy, and autism) that cast light on the cognitive and affective structure of moral judgments, reactions, and practices. Readings may be historical or contemporary

PHIL  341 - Jewish Philosophy (4)

An introductory course to both the history and major themes within modern Jewish thought from the early Enlightenment to our contemporary era, the intention of this course is to present an overview of the major thinkers who have shaped Jewish thought as well the major themes within modern Jewish history. The course will specifically focus on the themes of universalism, hope, and redemption within the context of Judaism's encounter with modernity as reflected on by Jewish intellectuals within the Western philosophical tradition.

PHIL  345 - Feminist Philosophy (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. A study of selected classical philosophical readings on women, and an examination of several philosophical issues of contemporary feminism such as sex equality, sexual harassment, and feminine versus feminist ethics.

PHIL  362 - Philosophy of Mind (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This course is a survey of philosophical accounts of the nature of the mind, including both historical and contemporary analyses. Special topics will be explored as well, and they may include: artificial intelligence, consciousness, intentionality, emotion, and the role of philosophy in the science of the mind.

PHIL  367 - Philosophy of History (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This seminar course examines universal, critical, and hermeneutic approaches to history in an attempt to discern if human existence has meaning, and if so, what that meaning is. Discussion will focus on the works of such philosophers as Nietzsche, Augustine, Hegel, Oakeshott, Collingwood, and Dilthey.

PHIL  370 - Philosophy of Action (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. Investigates the nature of human agency in the world, as distinct from those parts of the world incapable of action and robust agency. Possible topics include: what it is to act for a reason, how agency fits with a causal picture of the world, the nature of free will and whether we have it, weakness of will, addiction, autonomy, and the nature of the psychological elements of human acts (such as motivation, deliberation, belief, and intention). The course may also focus on the significance of these distinctions for practical moral and legal decision-making.

PHIL  372 - Philosophy of Law (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. A study of classic and contemporary texts dealing with different theories of the nature of law and the meaning of related concepts such as justice, authority, and legal obligation.

PHIL  373 - Contemporary Ethical Problems (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. An in-depth study of a selection of contemporary normative and meta-ethical issues.

PHIL  377 - Philosophy and Literature (4)

This variable topics course is a study of the philosophical significance of one or more writers of fiction. It may focus on a genre, period, or specific figure. Readings will be juxtaposed with relevant texts from the tradition of philosophy.

PHIL  380 - Special Topics in Philosophy (4)

A variable topics course based on the research or teaching interests of individual faculty.

PHIL  381 - Advanced Social and Political Philosophy (4)

This course is a philosophical exploration of four interrelated concepts: equality, justice, rights, and authority. It will examine their various meanings and the reasons given to support the values they represent. It will also demonstrate the prominent roles they play in a number of contemporary ethical and political debates. These concepts are usually understood and applied in national contexts, but debates about their role in international contexts may also be explored. Prerequisite: Majors and minors only.

PHIL  398 - Honors Thesis (4)

Prerequisite: Contact the Philosophy Department Program Assistant for more information. Open only to senior philosophy majors with a 3.3 cumulative GPA and a 3.75 GPA in Philosophy together with departmental approval of a prospectus, which must be submitted to the Department at the end of the semester prior to its being written.

PHIL  399 - Directed Reading and Research (1 - 6)

Written permission of the instructor, department chair, and dean is required. Offered as needed.

PHIL  402 - Phenomenology (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This course focuses on the challenge to Enlightenment rationality mounted by contemporary phenomenologists such as Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Through close readings and discussions of primary texts, students will learn to both understand phenomenological texts as well as conduct phenomenological analyses.

PHIL  403 - Pragmatism (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. A study of the classic American Pragmatist philosophies of Charles Sanders Pierce, William James, and John Dewey. Pragmatic strains in earlier and later American philosophy will also be examined.

PHIL  404 - Contemporary Thomism (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This course studies the Thomistic revival of the 20th century, which began with Aeterni Patris and culminated in the work of Maritain, Gilson, Pieper, and Lonergan. It may cover the whole movement or focus on a figure within it.

PHIL  405 - Analytic Philosophy: Frege to Wittgenstein (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. An historical introduction to the analytic tradition in philosophy, with emphasis on its neo-Kantian roots, the critique of traditional philosophy, the influence of science on philosophy and on the relation of philosophy to avant-garde art, and other cultural movements in the 20th century.

PHIL  406 - Postmodernism (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This course is a variable introduction to the debate concerning the purported end of modernity. We will analyze the postmodern critiques of the myths of the ego, language as representation, history as teleology, and technology as benign. We will also study the postmodern critiques of Marxism, Freudianism, Feminism, and political liberalism. May be repeated for credit each time a different topic is covered.

PHIL  480 - Topics in Contemporary Philosophy (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. An intensive study of selected problems in philosophy. Subject matter will vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit each time a different topic is covered.

PHIL  481 - Topics in Philosophy of Race (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. This course examines philosophical concepts central to race relations and policy, such as identity, ideology, social construction, racism and justice.

PHIL  482 - Topics in the History of Philosophy (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. An intensive study of selected historical philosophers. Subject matter will vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit each time a different topic is covered.

PHIL  483 - Topics in Political Philosophy (4)

Prerequisites: PHIL - 212 or PHIL - 303 or permission of instructor. An intensive study of selected problems in social and political philosophy. Subject matter will vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit each time a different topic is covered. Offered intermittently.

PHIL  484 - Topics in Ethics (4)

Prerequisite: Majors and minors only. An intensive study of selected problems in ethics. Subject matter will vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit each time a different topic is covered.

PHYS  100 - Introductory Physics I (4)

First course of the two-semester introductory sequence of algebra-based physics. Main topics include mechanics of particles and systems of particles, properties of matter, fluids, heat, waves, and sound. Primarily for students majoring in the life sciences. Concurrent lab enrollment required.

PHYS  100 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  101 - Introductory Physics II (4)

Second course of the two-semester introductory sequence of algebra-based physics. Main topics include electricity and magnetism, light, and an overview of modern atomic and subatomic physics. Primarily for students majoring in the life sciences. Concurrent lab enrollment required. • Prerequisite: PHYS 100

PHYS  101 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  110 - General Physics I (4)

First course of the two-semester introductory sequence of calculus-based physics. Main topics include Newtonian mechanics of particles and systems of particles, rigid bodies, gravitation, oscillations, and waves. Primarily for students majoring in the physical sciences and mathematics. Concurrent lab enrollment required. • Corequisite: MATH 109

PHYS  110 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  120 - Astronomy: From the Earth to the Cosmos (4)

An introduction to the universe, from the Earth to the most distant galaxies. Main topics include stars, galaxies, and cosmology, in addition to foundational topics such as gravitation, light, and matter. Primarily for non-science majors. Concurrent lab enrollment and observation nights required. No math or physics prerequisites.

PHYS  120 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  121 - Planetary Astronomy (4)

An introduction to the Solar System and extrasolar planetary systems. Main topics include the Sun; the planets and their moons; comets and asteroids; extrasolar planetary systems; and foundational topics such as gravitation, light, and matter. Primarily for non-science majors. Concurrent lab enrollment and observation nights required. No math or physics prerequisites.

PHYS  121 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  122 - The Geometry of the Cosmos: Einstein, Black Holes, and the Big Bang (4)

An introduction to the geometry of the cosmos, centered on black holes and the Big Bang, as described by Einstein's Universe: general relativity. Problems related to gravitation, space, time, and contemporary astronomy and cosmology are considered. Primarily for non-science majors. No math or physics prerequisites.

PHYS  130 - Concepts in Physics (4)

A mostly conceptual introduction to the principles and applications of physics. Main topics include the laws of motion, conservation principles, gravitation, and the properties of matter, light, and sound. Primarily for students majoring in Architecture and Community Design. Concurrent lab enrollment required. 
Pre-requisites: Math 107, 109, or high school calculus.

PHYS  130 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  135 - Masterpiece Physics (4)

Within a background of artistic masterpieces, this course explores sound, light, color, and how the brain perceives them. Special topics include musical instruments, photographic cameras, and paintings; and the mathematical structures within pieces of artistic expression. Concurrent lab enrollment required. 
No math or physics prerequisites.

PHYS  135 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

PHYS  201 - Physics by Inquiry (4)

A step-by-step introduction to physics and the physical sciences. Starting from their own observations, students develop basic physical concepts, use and interpret different forms of scientific representations, and construct explanatory models with predictive capability. No math or physics prerequisites.

PHYS  201 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  210 - General Physics II (4)

Second course of the two-semester introductory sequence of calculus-based physics. Main topics include electromagnetism (electric fields, electric currents, circuits, magnetic fields, Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves) and thermodynamics (heat and the laws of thermodynamics). Primarily for students majoring in the physical sciences and mathematics. Concurrent lab enrollment required. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 110 and MATH 109; corequisite: MATH 110

PHYS  210 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  221 - Rocks, Clocks and Cosmic Walks (4)

Course topics will focus on the historical development of astronomy, including the astronomy and cosmology of ancient cultures and peoples, the role and contributions of Jesuit astronomers and the Jesuit scientific tradition, and, the development of modern cosmology through the scientific revolution. Material will include the discoveries and cosmologies of various Native American, Hawaiian and indigenous peoples, central/south American and Middle Eastern cultures, as well as the Indian and Chinese cultures. This class is designed to be an introductory astronomy course open to any student at USF. No math or physics prerequisites.

PHYS  240 - Modern Physics (4)

An introduction to relativistic and quantum physics. Topics include special and general relativity, and the experimental and theoretical basis of quantum physics (with emphasis on Schrodinger quantum mechanics). Applications are drawn from atomic, molecular, solid-state, nuclear, and particle physics. Primarily for students majoring in the physical sciences and mathematics. Prerequisites: PHYS 210 and MATH 110; corequisite: MATH 211 Prerequisites: PHYS 210 with a minimum grade of C and MATH 110 with a minimum grade of C and concurrent MATH 211 with a minimum grade of C

PHYS  286 - Special Topics in Physics (4)

Topics not covered by other Physics curriculum offerings. Offered intermittently.

PHYS  286 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  298 - Directed Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1 - 4)

With the written consent of the instructor and the Department chair, a special study (of various forms and credit values) in experimental, theoretical or mathematical physics.

PHYS  299 - Directed Research for Advanced Undergraduates (1 - 4)

With the written consent of the instructor and the Department chair, a special study (of various forms and credit values) in experimental, theoretical or mathematical physics.

PHYS  301 - Computational Physics (4)

An introduction to the use of computer simulations in physics, with emphasis on computer models and numerical techniques. In addition, special topics (such as chaos, fractals, neural networks, and statistical physics) may be introduced. No previous familiarity with programming languages is assumed. Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211

PHYS  310 - Analytical Mechanics (4)

General theory of three formulations of classical mechanics: Newtonian, Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian; and introduction to the calculus of variations. Applications include linear and nonlinear oscillations, gravitation and central-force motion, noninertial frames, systems of particles, and rigid-body motion. Emphasis is placed on those concepts that provide a transition to quantum mechanics. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 210 and MATH 110; corequisite: MATH 211.

PHYS  312 - Statistical and Thermal Physics (4)

Survey of classical thermodynamics and introduction to the theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics in three different ensembles: microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical. Applications include ideal and real gases, Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac statistics, blackbody radiation, specific heats, magnetic systems, and phase transitions. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211; corequisite: PHYS 371

PHYS  320 - Electricity and Magnetism (4)

General theory of electromagnetism, centered on Maxwell's equations. Topics include electrostatics, Laplace's and Poisson's equations and boundary value problems, multipole expansions, magnetostatics, dielectric and magnetic media, and Maxwell’s equations (including potential formulations of electrodynamics and electromagnetic waves). Prerequisites: PHYS 210 and MATH 211; Corequisite: PHYS 371 Prerequisites: PHYS 210 with a minimum grade of C and MATH 211 with a minimum grade of C and concurrent PHYS 371 with a minimum grade of C

PHYS  330 - Quantum Mechanics (4)

General theory of quantum mechanics, including its abstract formulation using the Dirac notation. Topics include the quantum postulates, the position and momentum representations, the generalized uncertainty principle, quantum dynamics and the Hamiltonian, the harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, spin, central potentials, and select approximation methods. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211; corequisite: PHYS 371

PHYS  333 - Solid State Physics (4)


An introduction to the physics of the solid state and condensed matter. Topics include crystal lattices, thermal properties, the free-electron gas, the dielectric constant, band theory, diamagnetism and paramagnetism, and transport theory. Applications are centered on metals, semiconductors, and superconductors, with emphasis on the underlying quantum principles. 
 Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211. Corequisite: PHYS 371

PHYS  340 - Optics (4)

An in-depth study of geometric and physical optics. Applications include matrix formulation of geometrical optics in a form suitable for computer calculations, multiple-layer dielectric films, polarization, interference, diffraction, and holography. Offered in the Fall of even-numbered years.

PHYS  341 - Upper Division Lab I (4)

A group of advanced physics experiments at the upper-division level. Laboratories emphasize optics, in addition to atomic physics, fundamental constants, nuclear physics, and chaos. 
 Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211.

PHYS  342 - Upper Division Lab II (4)

A group of advanced physics experiments at the upper-division level. Laboratories emphasize solid state physics, in addition to atomic physics, fundamental constants, nuclear physics, and chaos. 
 Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211.

PHYS  343 - Astrophysics (4)

An overview of astrophysics themes that includes techniques of Earth-bound observation and a selection from topics on the Solar System, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. The evolution and internal workings of astrophysical systems is discussed, along with spectroscopy, abundances of the elements, nucleosynthesis, and final stages of stellar evolution. Emphasis is on the way that physics is applied to astronomy. 
 Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211

PHYS  350 - Physics Colloquium (1)

Weekly physics colloquium given by invited speakers on miscellaneous topics of current interest. Topics are selected from the frontiers of current physics research, as well as from exceptional historical or philosophical perspectives of the discipline. The course also includes the presentation of seminars by the students. Students may register for this course in more than one semester.

PHYS  361 - Electronics (4)

This course provides an introduction to methods of electronics measurements, particularly the application of oscilloscopes and computer-based data acquisition. Topics covered include diodes, transistors, operational amplifiers, filters, transducers, and integrated circuits. Emphasis is placed on practical knowledge, including prototyping, troubleshooting, and laboratory notebook style. 
 Prerequisites: PHYS 210 and MATH 110. Corequisite: MATH 211

PHYS  361 - Laboratory (0)

PHYS  371 - Methods of Mathematical Physics (4)

A study of selected mathematical techniques of universal applicability across the different branches of physics. A typical selection includes advanced linear algebra, Fourier series, integral transforms, ordinary and partial differential equations, Green's functions and Sturm-Liouville theory, and complex analysis. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211

PHYS  380 - Foundations of Computational Neuroscience (4)

An introduction to the physical, mathematical, and computational concepts and techniques used to formulate biophysical models of neurons and synaptic transmissions to study the brain and neural systems. Topics include ion movement through cell membranes, single-neuron models, generation of action potentials, synapses and neurotransmitters, neuronal networks, and learning and memory. No physics, biology, or programming prerequisites.

PHYS  386 - Special Topics in Physics (4)

Topics not covered by other Physics curriculum offerings. Offered intermittently.

PHYS  398 - Directed Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1 - 4)

With the written consent of the instructor and the Department chair, a special study (of various forms and credit values) in experimental, theoretical or mathematical physics.

PHYS  399 - Directed Research for Advanced Undergraduates (1 - 4)

With the written consent of the instructor and the Department chair, a special study (of various forms and credit values) in experimental, theoretical or mathematical physics.

PHYS  410 - Advanced Classical Dynamics (4)

Advanced applications of classical nonrelativistic mechanics. Topics include a comprehensive study of the dynamics of systems of particles and rigid bodies, properties of three-dimensional rotations and tensors, coupled oscillations, and an introduction to the mechanics of continuous media (with fluid dynamics and elasticity). 
 Prerequisites: PHYS 310 and PHYS 371

PHYS  420 - Advanced Electrodynamics (4)

Advanced applications of Maxwell's equations and the dynamics of the electromagnetic field. Topics include conservation laws, electromagnetic waves (in a vacuum, in infinite linear media, and in bounded regions), optical dispersion in material media, electromagnetic radiation, and the relativistic formulation of electrodynamics. 
 Prerequisites: PHYS 320 and PHYS 371

PHYS  422 - General Relativity (4)

An introduction to Einstein's general theory of relativity as the classical field theory of gravitation. Topics include special relativity, four-dimensional spacetime, the principle of equivalence, the geometry of curved spacetime (with Riemannian geometry and tensor analysis), and the Einstein field equation. Applications are centered on astrophysical systems, black holes, and cosmology. 
 Prerequisites: PHYS 240 and MATH 211

PHYS  430 - Advanced Quantum Mechanics (4)

Advanced applications of the abstract formulation of quantum mechanics. Topics include identical particles, time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, the variational principle, the WKB method, the adiabatic approximation, scattering theory, and second quantization. The course ends with an introduction to the EPR paradox, Bell's theorem, and the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 330 and PHYS 371 Prerequisites: PHYS 330 with a minimum grade of C and PHYS 371 with a minimum grade of C

PHYS  450 - Advanced Materials (4)

Surveys modern advanced materials; emphasis on fundamental underlying principles; semiconductors; superconductors; photonic materials; liquid crystals; polymers. Prerequisites: PHYS 240 with a minimum grade of C and MATH 211 with a minimum grade of C and concurrent PHYS 371 with a minimum grade of C

PHYS  486 - Special Topics in Physics (4)

Topics not covered by other Physics curriculum offerings. Offered intermittently.

POLS  92 - LSAT Prep Course (2)

This skills enrichment course is designed to help students prepare for the LSAT, the standardized examination required by most U.S. law schools as part of the application process. Students will learn the core content as well as the tricks standard to the LSAT. NOTE: This course does NOT count toward major credit in the Politics Department.

POLS  101 - Introduction to American Politics (4)

An introduction to the Constitutional institutions and structures of U.S. government, how they have evolved, and the actors who participate in the process. Topics include electoral politics, social issues, economic policy, federalism, interest groups, the Presidency, Congress, the courts, and related subjects. Offered every semester.

POLS  102 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (4)

A course which situates and compares the political institutions, cultures, and processes of states in a variety of world regions. Special attention is paid to the comparison of non-Western regions, including Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Offered every semester.

POLS  113 - Introduction to International Politics (4)

A course which situates and compares the political institutions, cultures, and processes of states in a variety of world regions. Special attention is paid to the comparison of non-Western regions, including Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Offered every semester.

POLS  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

POLS  203 - Introduction to Political Theory (4)

Provides a critical survey of Western political theory. The course focuses on authority and resistance, including how political authority is justified, and arguments for civil disobedience, passive resistance, and revolution. Readings include works by Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and contemporary feminists. Offered every year.

POLS  211 - Community Engagement (SL) (2)

The Community Engagement course emphasizes a focus on the multidimensionality of service in order to be most effective in one's community. Leadership development, theory-practice integration, reflection, critical thinking, negotiation and conflict management skills provide relevant learning opportunities for students throughout the semester.

POLS  218 - Public Policy and Administration (4)

A case study approach is used to examine major themes such as the role of the administrator, intergovernmental relations, personnel motivation, the concept of administrative ecology, and ethics in public service. Class discussion is emphasized as students are introduced to the complex world of public administration. Offered every year.

POLS  222 - Approaches to Political Research (4)

This course exposes students to the fundamentals of applied political research and critical social analysis, from developing a research problem to making recommendations for policy reform and social justice changes at the local, national, and international levels of governance.

POLS  292 - Special Topics in Politics (1 - 2)

POLS  300 - The World Since 1945 (4)

An interpretive political history of the world since 1945, focusing on major actors, events, and international affairs, Western and non-Western. Cross-listed with HIST 300. Offered every other year.

POLS  301 - (4)

A critical examination of the origin, nature, and development of American political thought from the founding(s) to 1865. Central themes include the relationship between the individual and the political community, the tensions between equality and liberty, and the meaning of democracy. Offered every other fall.

POLS  302 - Modern American Political Thought, 1865-present (4)

A critical examination of the nature and development of American political thought from the Civil War to the present. Central themes include the the tensions between democracy and capitalism, the role of race, ethnicity and gender in political life, and the development of the American empire. Offered every other spring.

POLS  305 - Critical Race Theory (4)

Explores this new field, an interdisciplinary area of study that began in legal studies and has emerged as a force in political theory, cultural studies, and post-colonial studies. Examines the role of race as a social construct that organizes political interactions. Explores fresh approaches to race relations in the new millennium, particularly through the intersection of theories of political identity and structural explanations of racial and ethnic inequality. Active class participation and a research paper required. Offered intermittently.

POLS  307 - The Socialist Tradition (4)

Cross-listed with Humanities Honors 336. Must be in Honors Humanities Program or have permission of the instructor. Seminar examines the key writings of the Socialist tradition in Europe, the United States, and elsewhere around the world. Readings will include classic works of Socialist non-fiction and fiction, Socialist biography and autobiography, and Socialist perspectives on areas such as art, music, literature, film, photography, community, work, gender, race, class, and political consciousness. Socialism's historic development and impact and its present condition will also be examined. Offered every other Spring.

POLS  308 - Literature and Political Thought (4)

Examines the relationship between politics and literature. Readings include works of literature by writers chiefly known for their political writings (Machivelli and Montesquieu) and literary works that speak to central political issues (works by Shakespeare, Melville, Morrison, Kundera, DeLillo). Central questions include: What can literature teach us about political life and power? How can writing serve as a means of resisting or eroding power? Offered every other year.

POLS  310 - Politics, Film and Hollywood (4)

Course explores the relationship between politics, movies and the Hollywood film industry. Students will examine the political history of Hollywood movies, explore the politics in those films, and how Hollywood has influenced American and foreign politics. Issues considered include censorship, war and Cold war, terrorism, race, class, gender, political ideology, genre politics, law, religion, science, sports, and the American dream. Film series will accompany the course.

POLS  311 - China Today (4)

This cultural diversity immersion class explores Beijing – the heart and soul of China – to understand its current influence in the world. We experience China’s complex culture, economy, politics, business, and society. Please contact professor to find out about the program cost.

POLS  312 - Philippines Today (4)

This is an intensive service learning and cultural diversity justice immersion class on the Philippines. During Philippines Today, you will experience the Philippines’ rich and complex environment, culture, economy, politics, and society firsthand. An overriding theme for the service learning immersion is the Philippines rural and urban environment, particularly in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, and the social justice work that still needs to be done.

POLS  314 - Theories of Citizenship and Globalization (4)

Study of theory and practice of modern democracies, with an emphasis on recent democratization. Topics include causes of democratization, threats to newly formed democracies, and consolidation of democratic regimes through building state institutions and constitutional structures, designing electoral systems and political parties, establishing civilian control over the military, and creating democratic culture. Other topics include the relation between economic development and democratic consolidation, and between globalization and democratization. Course assesses the state of democracy throughout the world, and explores what democracy should mean today. Offered every other year.

POLS  315 - Race and Ethnicity in Global Politics (4)

Examines a variety of social science methods and their application to the study of the politics of race and ethnicity in American society. Four general cases are examined: African-Americans, American Indians, Asian-Americans, and Hispanic/Latino-Americans. Offered intermittently.

POLS  316 - Law, Politics, and Baseball (4)

An examination of the relationship between sports and politics, and of the evolution of the American political economy through the lens of baseball. Using the fictional and non-fictional literature of the national pastime, the course will examine the origins, history and contemporary state of the American dream. The U.S. national pastime will be used to reflect on issues of class, gender, race and ethnicity, law and society, foreign policy, labor-management conflicts, and the evolving political economy. Legal cases and debates will be used, in particular, to examine these themes.

POLS  317 - Religion and Politics (4)

The study of the linkages between religion and politics. Religion as a political construct and as an instrument of power in society. Is religion simply a matter of faith? Is it only personal or is it the opiate of the masses? Given the political capital of religion in modern society, is it even possible to maintain the great wall of separation between church and state? Course will focus on the writings of Montesquieu, Marx, Jefferson, David Walker, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Reinhold Niebuhr, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Hannah Arendt. Individual and group projects will be employed. Offered every year.

POLS  319 - From Baroque to the Enlightenment (4)

Cross-listed with Honors Humanities 326. Must be in Honors Humanities program or have Permission of Instructor. Works of principal eighteenth century French, English and American studies on the nature of human society are read and discussed. Eighteenth century art, literature and music, especially the opera, are examined as well. Offered every other year.

POLS  320 - Urban Politics (4)

Examines urban politics in 20th century America. Topics and issues include: machine and reform politics, federal intervention, the dependent city, and urban economic development; the impact of race, ethnicity, and class; pro-growth politics; housing policy and homelessness, city finances and service delivery, crime, transportation policy, urban violence, community control movements, and black political ascendancy. Offered every other year.

POLS  321 - American Presidency (4)

An analysis of presidential politics, constitutional functions and personalities. Assessments of the elective process, policy-making, leadership, power relations, and past and future directions. Offered every other Fall.

POLS  322 - Politics of American Justice (4)

Evaluation of justice and injustice in the U.S. system, stressing political, economic and social issues, the legal process, crime and victimization, and the relationship between political economy and human rights. Offered every Fall.

POLS  323 - Lawmaking (4)

How a bill becomes a law is examined from the perspective of the institutions and individuals that participate in that process. Focusing on the U.S. Congress, the course covers such topics as elections, institutional change, issues of representation, and the implications for policy. Offered every other Fall.

POLS  324 - African-American Politics (2)

This course surveys African-American political activity and the politics of race in the United States, primarily in the 20th century. Topics to be covered include: black city politics; blacks and American political institutions: law and the courts, Congress, the Presidency; political mobilization in the post-World War II era; popular movements for civil rights, black power, and community control; as well as electoral politics, its promises and consequences. Offered every other year.

POLS  325 - Latino Politics in the U.S. (4)

Examination of contemporary Latino political communities in the U.S. Field-based research project required. Offered intermittently.

POLS  326 - Politics and the Media (4)

A critical overview and evaluation of U.S. media, emphasizing their political, social and economic foundations and influences; their impact on American politics, life, culture and consciousness; and media alternatives. Offered every other year.

POLS  327 - American Reformers and Revolutionaries (4)

A people's political history of modern America as seen through 20th century political movements and through the lives and times of reformers and revolutionary leaders such as Eugene Debs, Big Bill Haywood, John Reed, Emma Goldman, Jack London, Dorothy Day, Cesar Chavez, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and Tom Hayden. Readings include a political overview, but emphasize a series of political biographies. Offered every other Spring.

POLS  328 - Politics of the '60s in America (4)

Examines both the political thinking and the political activity which strongly challenged the stability of the American system during the 1960s. Includes detailed analyzes of the various civil rights struggles of the '60s as well as the anti-Vietnam War and counter-culture movements. Offered intermittently.

POLS  329 - Women and American Politics (4)

Historical and contemporary focus on the way women have influenced and participated in American politics. Includes women as voters and as office holders, as well as women's influence on public policy areas such as social welfare, war and peace, suffrage, ERA, and affirmative action. Offered intermittently.

POLS  330 - Crime, Law and the Constitution (4)

Examines the procedural and substantive meanings of the concept of due process of law found in the 5th and 14th Amendments of the United States Constitution and the other Bill of Rights provisions that protect people accused of crime. Course will analyze a series of landmark Supreme Court cases on this subject, the response to those decisions, and their impact on criminal justice and law enforcement. Offered every other year.

POLS  331 - Latin American Politics (CD) (4)

An introduction to the major economic, cultural, and institutional factors that shape contemporary Latin American politics, including the role of the United States, the changing international economy and its impact on public policy and political behavior. Offered every other year.

POLS  332 - Political Thought of Developing Countries (4)

This seminar in political theory considers writings by leaders and theorists of the ongoing struggle for decolonization. It examines different tactics for independence and/or liberation such as violent versus nonviolent approaches, nationalism and culture as tools of empowerment, difficulties with achieving economic independence, and religion as a tool of resistance. It also considers the legacies of colonialism today including migration, economic inequalities and regime instability. Specific topics covered include African socialism, Latin American Marxism, Islamic Fundamentalism, negritude, and Indian Independence. Texts by Gandhi, Fanon, Guevara, and Khomeini will be studied. It is highly recommended that students have taken courses in Political Theory or Political Philosophy. Offered every other year.

POLS  333