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Rhetoric and Language Courses

RHET  100 - Editing and Proofreading Skills (1)

Open to all students. This one-credit course emphasizes recognizing and correcting errors in grammar, usage and syntax, and strengthens revision practices by having students revise and proofread their papers for other courses.

RHET  101 - Workshop on Academic Writing for Multilingual Students (2)

This course is designed to provide a variety of strategies to assist fully-admitted multilingual students in composing and editing their written work for other classes.

RHET  102 - Writing Center for Credit (1)

Open to all students. This self-paced one-credit C/NC course allows students to work regularly with a Writing Center preceptor to revise papers done for other courses. In order to gain credit, the student must successfully complete a contract agreed upon by the student and instructor.

RHET  103 - Public Speaking (4)

This course introduces students to rhetorical concepts that are fundamental to the study and practice of ethical and effective oral communication. Emphasis is on making effective presentations in classroom and public settings. Fulfills Core A1.

RHET  104 - Argumentation and Debate (4)

This class will examine argumentation and debate and its relationship to public speaking. Instruction will focus on the evolution of argumentation from classical to present, the theoretical bases of debate and the construction and critique of debate rhetoric. Students will use research and evidence to build arguments, analyze propositions and perform several mock-debates. This is a public speaking course that fulfills the Core A1 requirement.

RHET  105 - Acad Disc Wkshop/Multilingual (2)

This course is designed to develop academic discussion skills required for successful participation in college courses. This includes a focus on developing the ability to both contribute to and lead discussions. Students will have to ask and answer questions, take positions, react to others’ position, and evaluate discussion techniques of self and others.

RHET  106 - (4)

This course focuses on preparing students for academic writing at the college level. The course emphasizes the connection between reading and writing. Students learn and practice the writing process, from idea to final essay (e.g., pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing), finding and evaluating sources, summarizing, paraphrasing, quoting, citing, and documenting conventions. Individualized attention is given to grammar, vocabulary development, and rhetorical style. The minimum passing grade for this course is C-.

RHET  106 - Intro to Composition Intensive (6)

This course, designed for students who need additional practice in writing and reading, focuses on preparing students for academic writing at the college level. The course emphasizes the connection between reading and writing. In addition to four units of classroom instruction, students learn and practice the writing process, from idea to final essay (e.g., pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing) in a 2-hour computer writing lab each week. They learn and practice finding and evaluating sources, summarizing, paraphrasing, quoting, citing, and documenting conventions. Individualized attention is given to reading, fluency, vocabulary development, and rhetorical style. The minimum passing grade for this course is C-.

RHET  107 - Workshop on Academic Reading for Multilingual Students (2)

This course is designed to provide a variety of strategies to assist fully-admitted multilingual students in developing comprehension and fluency in reading materials for college classes.

RHET  108 - Introduction to Composition (4)

Introduction to Composition prepares students for college-level composition by helping them gain competence in civic and academic discourse and write persuasively to a variety of audiences. The course emphasizes how writers can achieve focus and coherence; support their claims with evidence, including evidence drawn from outside sources; adapt appeals to emotion to particular audiences and purposes; and use syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling to establish their credibility as writers. To achieve these goals, students write a minimum of 6,000 words of revised prose in essays of increasing length and complexity. They develop these essays by writing drafts, revisions, or shorter pre-assignments every week; by assessing their own and other students' writing in small-group and whole class workshops; and by drafting with an emphasis on revision, editing, and proofreading. The minimum passing grade for this course is C-.

RHET  109 - Academic Reading Workshop (2)

Rhetoric 109 introduces rhetorical readings across the disciplines and assists students in the development of strategies to approach the reading and comprehension of given assignments with emphasis on claims of value, fact, and policy and accompanying support and warrants. Pre- and post-diagnostic testing will be employed as a way of measuring entry-level skills, student progress, and exit-level proficiencies. All work will be initiated in-class to lead students to a level of proficiency that will ensure engagement in upper-level courses.

RHET  110 - Written Comm I Intensive (6)

In order to prepare students for the kinds of writing typically required in college-level courses and in civic discourse, RHET 110 teaches the composition of thesis-driven argumentative essays that respond to important social and academic issues. In addition to four units of classroom instruction, students learn and practice the writing process, from idea to final essay (e.g., pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing) in a 2-hour computer writing lab each week. Using elements of rhetorical theory, students gain practice in composing brief to medium-length arguments that are focused, clearly organized, well supported and based on accurate critical reading of materials assigned by the instructor. Students develop skills in summary, paraphrase, and quotation; incorporating multiple sources in the service of a unified argument; and in addressing multiple points of view. Students are introduced to library research as a tool of academic inquiry and gain practice revising for whole-text coherence, as well as for clarity and correct usage. The minimum passing grade for this course is C-.

RHET  111 - Public Spkng/Health Profession (4)

This class is designed as an introductory course surveying the essential theory and skills related to public speaking. Its central focus concerns researching, organizing, delivering, and critically evaluating messages in the public context. Addition attention will be given to understanding and implementing the linguistic and visual strategies for explaining health- and science-related information to audiences.
Restricted to Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Nursing, Biology, and Exercise and Sport Science majors

RHET  112 - Presentational Speaking (4)

This course introduces students to rhetorical concepts that are fundamental to the study and practice of ethical and effective public speaking. Emphasis is on oral communication--including group discussion, interviews, presentations--in business and professional contexts.

RHET  113 - Acad Listen Wkshp/Multilingual (2)

This course is designed for non-native speakers of English who need to develop listening and note taking skills for academic purposes. Attention will be given to developing strategies that will increase students’ ability to comprehend, predict, summarize and review. Students will listen to authentic academic lectures and will engage in exercises that will evaluate comprehension of content as well as utilization of strategies.

RHET  120 - Written Communication II (4)

Prerequisite: RHET 110 with a minimum grade of C-. Generally it is to be taken in sequence after RHET 110. With a firm basis in the elements of rhetoric, critical reading, written argumentation, and library research established in RHET 110, students in RHET 120 learn to compose more ambitious arguments responding to and incorporating sources of greater number, length, complexity, and variety. In order to meet the demands of advanced academic discourse, students also (a) develop skills in critical analysis of challenging non-fiction prose texts from a range of disciplinary perspectives and subjects, with a particular focus on the linguistic and rhetorical strategies employed in these texts, and (b) conduct extensive library research in the process of planning and composing sophisticated academic papers. Students will also gain practice editing for stylistic fluency in accordance with conventions of advanced academic prose. Finally, students develop greater independence in formulating strategies for revision and expansion of written arguments. The minimum passing grade for this course is C-. This course fulfills Core A2, the University writing requirement.

RHET  125 - MB Scholars: Wrtg/Spkg in Cmty (4)

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Martín Baró Living-Learning Community. This year-longcourse examines social justice from the perspectives of rhetoric, language, and literature. It meets the learning outcomes of 0102-130/131, Written and Oral Communication and Core C1, Literature, with service learning and cultural diversity designations. Students must also register for 8 units of INTD 100. This course is a McCarthy Center Certified course. See website for more information and application form; applications are due May 1.

RHET  126 - MBS: Wrtg/Spkg in Cmty (SL) (4)

See RHET 125 for course description of RHET 125/126.

RHET  127 - Rhetoric, Diversity and Class (4)

RHET  130 - Written and Oral Communication (4)

Written and Oral Communication (130/131) is an accelerated two-semester course (4 credit hours per semester) that, when completed with a grade of C- or better, meets the university requirement for writing and public speaking (Core A1 and A2). In the first semester, students learn the basic practices of oral and written argument by writing a minimum of 7000 words of revised prose in essays of increasing length and complexity, including one research paper, and by giving two prepared speeches. Students learn to use textual support for argument, to read critically, to use transitions and documentation, and to organize appeals in support of a claim. They learn methods of development, practice and delivery for a variety of speeches, including topic selection, speech outlines, audience analysis, and visual aids. In the second semester, students expand their skills of argumentation and style, writing a minimum of 9000 words of revised prose and giving a minimum of two speeches: written and oral arguments of fact, value and policy, including research. Students who take this course should NOT register for RHET 103, Public Speaking.

RHET  131 - Written and Oral Communication (4)

See RHET 130 for course description of RHET 130/131.

RHET  135 - Comp for Multilingual Students (4)

RHET  195 - (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/
Restricted to Freshman class

RHET  202 - Writing for Performing Arts (4)

Prerequisites: RHET - 110 or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. This course emphasizes critical thinking and writing skills specifically as they relate to the discipline and theory of performing arts. In particular, this course will focus on the relationship between rhetoric and performance as two separate, but related fields of study and practice. The course introduces students to the concept of rhetoric as a practice and theory of communication, explores the concept of performance in theatre, anthropology, and politics, and considers how performances can be understood and analyzed as rhetorical acts. Recommended for majors in Performing Arts and Social Justice.
Restricted to Perf. Arts and Soc. Justice majors, and Performing Arts minors

RHET  203 - Writing in Psychology (4)

Prerequisites: A grade of C- in RHET - 120 , RHET - 130/131, RHET-195, or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. This course features argumentation and critical writing, reading, and thinking skills as applied to analysis or articles central to the field of Psychology. Required for and restricted to Psychology majors. Fulfills Core A2 for qualified transfer students.
Restricted to Psychology majors and minors

RHET  204 - Writing for Media Studies (4)

Prerequisites: RHET - 110 or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. This course emphasizes critical thinking and writing skills specifically as they relate to the discipline and theory of Media Studies. In particular, will help students understand the role of rhetoric in the media by giving them an overview of key readings – both literary and academic - from the Media Studies canon. The course will also help students approach texts in all forms of media – broadcast, film, print, music and online media – more critically. By introducing the study of rhetoric as a practice and theory of communication, students will be able to understand media texts as rhetorical acts.
Restricted to Media Studies majors and minors

RHET  205 - Writing for Social Sciences (4)

This course focuses on developing the reading, writing, and revising skills central to the social sciences. Coursework includes writing reviews of scholarly articles and research papers. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in RHET 110, 125, 130 or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. To fulfill the Core A2 requirements, students must earn a C- or higher.

RHET  206 - Writing for the Sciences (4)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the discourse modes of the physical and life sciences and to develop writing skills for these disciplines, including writing reviews of scholarly articles, writing for the general public and writing a research paper. Through class discussion, group activities, writing, review and revision, students will improve critical thinking and writing skills and be able to communicate with a variety of audiences in a variety of genres. Open only to science and nursing majors.
Colleges restricted to College of Arts and Sci (Sci) and School of Nursing.

RHET  208 - Writing for Politics (4)

This course features argumentation and critical writing, reading, and thinking skills as applied to analysis of texts central to the field of Politics. Required for and restricted to Politics majors and minors. Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in RHET 110, RHET 125, 130, 195 or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. Fulfills Core A2.
Restricted to Politics majors and minors

RHET  212 - Writing for International Studies (4)

RHET 212 is designed to provide transfer students, with prior writing credits, an introduction to the standards and research methods expected at the University of San Francisco. The materials used in this course will address a variety of international topics that send students on virtual travels to other cultures and communities while addressing specific writing assignments. Students will become more aware of their global-citizenship as they fulfill the core writing requirements of this university stressing academic writing and research skills. A grade of C- or better is required to pass this course. Students may take 0102-251, Writing Studio, concurrently with this course. Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in RHET 110, RHET 125, 130, 195 or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. Fulfills Core A2.

RHET  214 - Writing for Literary Studies (4)

This course emphasizes writing about literature through careful reading, close textual analysis, and thoughtful literary interpretation. Restricted to majors in English, Comparative Literature, and Modern and Classical Languages. Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in RHET 110, RHET 125, 130, 195 or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. Fulfills Core A2.

RHET  216 - Writing for Advertising (4)

This course explores the functions, techniques, and skills involved in advertising communication writing with a primary emphasis on analyzing campaigns, copywriting, business and marketing communication, writing for the Web, and writing short scripts for radio and television. Aside from improving their advertising and business writing skills, students will work on developing their understanding of media aesthetics, persuasion and argument, organizational behavior, and production. They will also work on developing their own interpersonal communication skills and creativity as well as their presentation skills. The course is career oriented, so during the semester, students may be asked to carry out research for and participate in actual professional advertising activities. Students will also focus on those writing skills necessary to find and keep a job in advertising which may include cover letters, resumes, emails, and memos.

RHET  250 - Academic Writing at USF (4)

This course is designed to provide transfer students with prior college composition credits an introduction to the standards and research methods expected at the University of San Francisco. It is an intensive course that will fulfill the Core writing requirement and stress academic writing and research skills. A grade of C- or better is required to pass this course.

RHET  295 - S.I.T. Seminar for Transfer Students (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

RHET  297 - Writing in Sociology (4)

Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in RHET - 120 , RHET - 130/131, RHET-195, or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. This course features argumentation and critical writing, reading, and thinking skills as applied to analysis of texts central to the field of Sociology. Required for and restricted to Sociology majors. Fulfills Core A2 for qualified transfer students.

RHET  304 - Theories and Methods of Argument (4)

One popular textbook tells us that, “argument is everywhere.” In fact, many disciplines depend on argumentation as feature of their work: communication, philosophy, law, and linguistics. This course focuses on the growing and (often troubling) study of argument in the past half century by recognizing argumentation as a dynamic concept as well as an art of inquiry and advocacy. We will read challenging theoretical articles about argumentation and use those theories to explore argument practices in the fields of politics, law, and aesthetics. Along the way students will become more critical consumers of arguments as well as the individuals and institutions that produce them.

RHET  310 - Business and Technical Writing (4)

Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in RHET - 120 , RHET - 130/131, RHET-195, or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. Students will learn the practices of writing in business and technical fields and contexts. Students will produce several major documents (at least one of them collaboratively) typically used in business and technical environments (such as a proposal, a report, an instruction manual, a trade journal article or a web site; a portfolio of correspondence), and will complete a variety of minor assignments (e.g., a Power Point presentation, an oral presentation, or an instruction sheet). Students will also develop skills in editing for correctness, clarity, and appropriateness of style and tone. Fulfills Core A2 for qualified transfer students.

RHET  320 - How English Works (4)

Prerequisite: C- or better in 0102-120, 131, 195, or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. This course provides students a foundation in linguistics, the study of human language, by focusing on the English language and its impact on society and societal institutions and issues, especially educational ones. In addition to examining the components and communicative function of languages (i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics), topics of language variation, language change and history, and the connection between academic linguistics and the everyday use of the English language will be covered. Fulfills Core A2 for qualified transfer students.

RHET  321 - History of the English Language (4)

Prerequisite: C- or better in 0102-120, 131, 195, or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. This class provides both linguistic and literary approaches to the history and development of the English language. By examining fragments and excerpts from literature of each phase in the development of English, students will become aware of language change and the interrelationship between English and other languages. In addition, students will develop an understanding of the relationship of language to literature, including the influence of culture and history on both. Fulfills Core A2 for qualified transfer students. Crosslisted with ENGL 321.

RHET  322 - Classical Rhetoric (4)

Prerequisite: C- or better in Core A2: Rhetoric and Composition 120, 126, 131, 195 or transfer credit in college-level composition with a grade of C- or higher. This course examines the creation and emergence of classical rhetorical theories and practices from early to late antiquity. Students will read, analyze and research the varying rhetorical traditions that helped shape educational practices and civic debate within different social contexts. This class also counts as an elective toward the Interdisciplinary Minor in Classical Studies. Fulfills Core A2 for qualified transfer students.

RHET  323 - Rhetoric and Popular Culture (4)

This course examines the social and symbolic influence of popular culture, focusing both on cultural forms--such as advertising, television, film, music, and social media-- and critical perspectives that shed light on their influence.

RHET  325 - "Writing for a Real World" Editing and Production Workshop (2 - 4)

Using USF's undergraduate journal Writing for a Real World as its vehicle, this course emphasizes the essential skills of copy editing (i.e., mastery of grammar, style, citation, querying, and developing strong habits of verifying information). Working with real deadlines, students will learn layout and production essentials (InDesign basics will be emphasized).

RHET  330 - Conflict Resolution (4)

This course provides an understanding of the role of communication in resolving and transforming conflict and will help students to assess and improve their own ways of responding to interpersonal, intra-group, intergroup, intercultural, organizational, and international conflict through the study and practice of the various processes of conflict intervention.
Restricted to Junior, Sophomore, and Senior classes

RHET  390 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

RHET  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)