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Catalog

German Studies Courses

GERM  101 - First Semester German (4)

German 101 is the first in a three semester series of courses designed to introduce students to the German language and to provide them with the basic skills to function in a new linguistic and cultural environment. While the class sessions are centered on practicing communication in German, all four skills for language acquisition – listening, speaking, reading and writing – are emphasized. This course requires additional conversation practice in nine scheduled sessions outside of the class meetings. German 101 is offered every fall semester. Note: All students enrolling in a German class at USF for the first time who have taken German before and/or were raised speaking German are required to take the placement test and/or contact the German Studies coordinator. (Please see the Department of Modern and Classical Languages website for more information).

GERM  102 - Second Semester German (4)

German 102 is the second in a three semester series of courses designed to introduce students to the German language and to provide them with the basic skills to function in a new linguistic and cultural environment. While the class sessions are centered on practicing communication in German, all four skills for language acquisition – listening, speaking, reading and writing – are emphasized. This course requires additional conversation practice in nine scheduled sessions outside of the class meetings. German 102 is offered every spring semester. Prerequisite: GERM 101 or equivalent German language proficiency as determined by the department. (Please see the Department of Modern and Classical Languages website for more information).

GERM  102 - German 102 Language Practicum (0)

GERM  201 - Third Semester German (4)

German 201 is the last in a three semester series of courses designed to introduce students to the German language and to provide them with the basic skills to function in a new linguistic and cultural environment. While the class sessions are centered on practicing communication in German, all four skills for language acquisition – listening, speaking, reading and writing – are emphasized. German 201 is offered every fall semester. Prerequisite: GERM 102 or equivalent German language proficiency as determined by the department. (Please see the Department of Modern and Classical Languages website for more information).

GERM  202 - Fourth Semester German (4)

Intermediate German. This course focuses on reading, discussing, and writing about authentic materials in a culturally relevant context while reviewing and expanding grammatical concepts covered in first through third semester German. Extensive use of literary and non-fictional texts, film, and online resources will expand students’ German language proficiency and intercultural competence. Prerequisite: GERM - 201 or equivalent German language proficiency as determined by the department. (Please see the Department of Modern and Classical Languages website for more information).

GERM  305 - Conversation and Writing (4)

Continuation of intermediate German. Like German 202, this course focuses on reading, discussing, and writing about authentic materials in a culturally relevant context while reviewing and expanding on previously studied grammatical concepts. Extensive use of literary and non-fictional texts, film, and online resources will expand students’ German language proficiency and intercultural competence. Prerequisite: GERM - 202 or equivalent German language proficiency as determined by the department. (Please see the Department of Modern and Classical Languages website for more information).

GERM  310 - Advanced Readings and Composition (4)

This course stresses advanced reading, writing and discussion in German based on a variety of authentic materials like fictional and non-fictional texts. Specific topics to be determined. Prerequisite: GERM - 305 or equivalent German language proficiency as determined by the department. (Please see the Department of Modern and Classical Languages website for more information).

GERM  315 - Contemporary German Civilization (4)

Addresses the rise of post-war Germany as a democracy and the process of reunification. Focuses on current political and cultural issues; specific topics will be determined.

GERM  318 - Jewish Literature and Culture in 20th Century Europe (4)

Taught in English. Fulfills Core-C Literature requirement. Listed as elective for Jewish Studies and Social Justice, International Studies, and European Studies. This course examines some of the most important issues involving ethnicity, heritage, and identity by focusing on major expressions by writers and artists of Jewish background in Western and Eastern Europe. The class is interdisciplinary in scope, using literature, theater, film, art, music, and other media to define concepts that have shaped significant contributions by Jewish artists, thinkers and intellectuals, particularly in the German and Yiddish vernacular. Against the changing historical backgrounds, the class seeks to gain a deeper understanding of what it meant to be Jewish in the early part of the century, and to distinguish different forms of acculturation and/or assimilation. It then moves on to discusses literary testimonies of Holocaust survivors and ends with examples of the burgeoning Jewish culture in post-wall Germany.

GERM  320 - German Literature and Culture/1945-Today (4)

Taught in English. Fulfills Core-C Literature requirement. Listed as elective for International Studies and European Studies. This course centers on discussions of literary production in post – World War II Germany against the background of the profound historical, political and social changes in central Europe and the world at large, which mark the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century. After explorations into different works from East- and West-Germany until 1989 and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, a particular emphasis will be placed on developments in the “new” German capital Berlin. Students examine texts in different genres, including prose, poetry, theory, and film, while gaining a deeper understanding of the contexts in which new ideas and forms of expression emerge. A special focus will be the question of identity and identifications as shaped by personal, national, and trans-national influences.

GERM  350 - Paris-Berlin (4)

Taught in English. Fulfills Core-C Literature requirement. Cross-listed with French Studies. Listed as elective for International Studies, European Studies, and Jewish Studies and Social Justice. This course explores the profound social and intellectual changes which marked the turn into the 20th century in Europe, particularly Germany, Austria, and France, and the reflection of these changes in the arts. The concepts of “modernity” and “modernism” will be the point of departure for an overview of the “_isms” by which this period is defined in political (e.g. Nationalism, Imperialism, Socialism, Capitalism, Feminism), philosophical (e.g. Social Darwinism, Rationalism, Idealism), and artistic terms (e.g. Naturalism, Postimpressionism, Expressionism, Symbolism, Surrealism). We will analyze groundbreaking theoretical works by Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, and others, and delineate their influences on literature and film. Special attention will be given to the interplay of different movements and ideas, and the (self-)awareness of the subject in a rapidly changing and challenging world.

GERM  398 - Dir Reading and Research (1 - 4)

Directed Studies supplement regular course offerings for smaller groups of students at a higher level of German proficiency. They focus on reading and discussing texts and films in German while improving written and oral language proficiency. The specific contents will be determined by instructor and students in collaboration. Interested students should contact the German Studies program coordinator.