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English Courses

ENGL  195 - FYS: First-Year Seminar (4)

First Year Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All FYSeminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many FYSeminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. FYSeminars are only open to students in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one FYS, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other FYSeminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/
Restricted to Freshman class

ENGL  198 - Ignatian Literary Magazine (1 - 4)

Laboratory course in magazine editing and production that uses the Ignatian literary magazine as its' vehicle. Offered every year.

ENGL  202 - Great Works of Western Literature (4)

This course is an exploration of literature from the Western tradition. It will help in the development of critical and analytical thinking and writing skills as students peruse the authors of classical or timeless works.

ENGL  203 - African American Literature Survey I (4)

The purpose of this course is to explore the major developments, themes, and works of African American literature from its eighteenth century beginnings to the dawning of the twentieth century. Beginning with an exploration of early eighteenth century African American song, sermon, speech and poetry, the course moves forward through the nineteenth century abolitionist and women's movement to the period of Reconstruction, featuring both major and minor writers.

ENGL  204 - African American Literature Survey II (4)

This course is the second half of the introductory survey of the literature of African Americans. Starting in 1915 at the beginning of the Harlem Renaissance, the course moves forward through the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s to the Women's Movement of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, featuring both major and minor writers.

ENGL  205 - Native American Literature and Film (4)

An introduction to American Indian experiences and cultures from the perspective of oral, written, and visual texts produced by Native North American Indians. The course will focus on various texts representative of emerging Native American literary and cinematic traditions beginning with early oral and ethnographic texts, culminating with a concentration on contemporary American Indian prose, poetry, and film.

ENGL  206 - Tales and Transformations (4)

Stories of transformation and metamorphosis have captivated cultures and writers for centuries. In this course, students read, think about and interpret both kinds of transformations: the changes that happen in stories, and the literary changes that happen to stories. Through reading and discussion, students practice written literary analysis and acquire familiarity with such literary matters as plot and character development, connotative and figural language, and the basic elements of poetry.

ENGL  207 - Major American Novelists (4)

Introductory survey of some landmark fiction written in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Likely authors include Hawthorne, Twain, Chopin, Wharton, Faulkner and Fitzgerald. The course will explore and analyze the development and the continuities and discontinuities of the American novel.

ENGL  208 - Survey of Women's Literature I (4)

This course studies the traditions of literature by women to the early nineteenth century. Through readings of poems, short fiction, novels, and non-fiction prose, the courses explores how women from diverse ethnic, racial, religious, and class background articulated the female experience. Special attention is paid to women's understanding and representation of creative authority as well as to the historical, cultural, and literary contexts in which writing by women is produced.

ENGL  209 - Survey of Women's Literature II (4)

This course examines a diverse body of works from the 19th and 20th centuries. We will read novels, poetry, plays, short stories, and essays with a particular focus on how women writers break and restructure traditional genre forms.

ENGL  210 - Shakespeare: An Introduction (4)

This class studies seven of Shakespeare's plays, the Early Modern period, and Shakespeare's relationship to this period. The course examines the literary, historical, social and cultural influences on Shakespeare's plays along with the moral judgments Shakespeare leads his readers to formulate on disparate topics.

ENGL  211 - Asian American Literature Survey (4)

This course introduces students to Asian American experiences through writings and films by Asians in America (including Chinese, Filipino/a, Japanese, Korean, Southeast Asian, South Asian, and Pacific Islanders--both immigrants and U.S.-born), from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Students analyze the evolution of Asian American consciousness expressed through their writings, raising historical and political issues such as acculturation processes, intergroup relations, media representation, race, culture, gender, sexuality, identity and Third World politics.

ENGL  212 - Introduction to Chicano/a Literature Survey (4)

This course introduces Chicano/a and Latino/a literary and cultural production in its various genres, including poetry, novels, short stories, plays, essay writing, performance and film.

ENGL  215 - Contemporary American Poetry (4)

An introduction to American poetry written after 1945, this class looks at major figures and movements that have shaped not just American literature but American culture. This class looks at poetry as an extension of historical and cultural contexts while also paying attention to the history and the craft of poetry. Authors include Charles Wright, Billy Collins, Allen Ginsburg, Jorie Graham, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, Terrance Hayes, W. S. Merwin, Susan Howe and many others.

ENGL  220 - Creative Writing for Non-English Majors (4)

In Creative Writing, students will be required to read and respond to (in writing and discussion) various short stories and poems, by both published and student writers, and to produce a portfolio of new and original fiction and poetry, including some revision.
Restrictions exclude English majors

ENGL  230 - Literature, Gender and Sexualities (4)

Through an exploration of ways that authors have written about gender and sexualities and have gendered and sexualized their writing, students will learn that gender and sexuality operate as analytic categories which inform not only the representation of characters and behaviors, but also textuality itself: the construction of plots, the mobility of syntax, tropes, and schemas, and the designs of language on the reader.

ENGL  235 - Literature and the Environment (4)

A survey of poetry, fiction and nonfiction across centuries and cultures. We will examine the philosophies that underpin ideas of nature, culture and ¿the wild¿; and examine the nature and place of creative literature in addressing environmental issues.

ENGL  250 - Intro to Creative Writing (4)

An introduction to the Writing Emphasis, this course explores the art of writing poetry and short fiction. Students will be required to read and respond to various assigned writings in order to further develop their critical skills; to become familiar with a diverse selection of writing styles, techniques, and forms; and to prepare for the student workshop. At the end of the semester, each student will hand in a portfolio of original and revised writings. Offered every semester.
Restricted to English majors, English in Writing minors, and English in Literature minors

ENGL  290 - Survey of British Literature and Methods (4)

Intensive reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama in the British tradition from the medieval period to the present. Introduction to the great themes and movements in British literary history; acquisition of a basic vocabulary for literary analysis in the context of practical criticism. Offered every semester.
Restricted to English majors

ENGL  291 - Survey of American Literature and Methods (4)

Intensive reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama in the American tradition from the colonial period to the present. Introduction to the great themes and movements in American literary history; acquisition of a basic vocabulary for literary analysis in the context of practical criticism. Offered every semester.
Restricted to English majors

ENGL  295 - SIT: Transfer Seminars (4)

Students-In-Transition (SIT) Seminars are designed and taught by faculty who have a special passion for the topic. All SIT Seminars are small classes (16 students) that count toward the university Core. Many SIT Seminars include enrichment activities such as excursions into the city or guest speakers. SIT Seminars are only open to transfer students who are in their first or second semester at USF, and students may only take one SIT Seminar, in either Fall or Spring. For a detailed description of this course, and other SIT Seminars this semester, go to this webpage by cutting and pasting the link: http://www.usfca.edu/artsci/firstyearsem/

ENGL  299 - Critical Analysis (4)

This course builds on the analytical and critical skills developed in English 190 and 191 through examination of the major methodologies of Twentieth Century literary theories. Offered every Fall.

ENGL  310 - Literature Period Courses: 1100-1700 (4)

Reading and discussion of major literary works from the Medieval period through the Renaissance, including those in the popular tradition. Topic changes regularly. Offered every semester.

ENGL  311 - Writing Faith: Exploring Poetics and the Politics of Spirituality in Medieval Literature (4)

This course will explore the social, spiritual, and aesthetic elements in Medieval writings that speak to the intellectual, moral, and spiritual responses of individual faith and society at large. Our readings will allow us to discuss how Medieval writers, especially women writers, express spirituality, hope, compassion, self-sacrifice, and justice. We will examine the elements of spirituality in the following general themes: mysticism, history, gender, and literary conventions. The course will end with explorations into the ways writers and filmmakers represent and appropriate Medieval faith in our contemporary world.

ENGL  320 - Literature Period Courses: 1700-1900 (4)

Reading and discussion of major literary works of the eighteenth and nineteenth century, including those in the popular tradition. Topic changes regularly. Offered every semester.

ENGL  321 - History of the English Language (4)

This class provides both linguistic and literary approaches to the history and development of the English language. By examining fragments and excerpts from literature of each phase in the development of English, students will become aware of language change and the interrelationship between English and other languages. In addition, students will develop an understanding of the relationship of language to literature, including the influence of culture and history on both. This is a Writing Intensive course and fulfills the Core A2 requirement for qualified transfer students.

ENGL  325 - "Writing for a Real World" Editing and Production Workshop (2 - 4)

Using USF's undergraduate journal Writing for a Real World as its vehicle, this course emphasizes the essential skills of copy editing (i.e., mastery of grammar, style, citation, querying, and developing strong habits of verifying information). Working with real deadlines, students will learn layout and production essentials (InDesign basics will be emphasized).

ENGL  330 - Literature Period Courses: 1900-Present (4)

Reading and discussion of major literary works of the twentieth century, including those in the popular tradition. Topic changes regularly. Offered every semester.

ENGL  335 - Feminist Thought (4)

An introduction to a variety of feminist theories and approaches with emphasis on the arts, philosophy, politics, and media. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Junior, and Senior classes

ENGL  340 - Shakespeare (4)

Examination of principal plays in the light of recent and contemporary criticism. Offered every semester.

ENGL  350 - Rhetoric and Culture (4)

An examination of the craft of writing as an artistic activity that links writers and readers with social issues and civic goals. Focusing on the confluence of rhetoric and semiotics, this class examines traditional notions of rhetoric and persuasion within a contemporary context. An advanced writing course, students research and write on issues of social and personal import in which they offer arguments into topics such as gender, law, race, environmental issues, popular culture, and other aspects of contemporary culture. Offered every Fall.

ENGL  360 - Intro to Writing Non-Fiction (4)

An in-depth study of literary prose from the dual perspectives of writer and critic. Students write essays, fiction, and literary criticism and analyze each of these forms in traditional classroom and workshop settings. The class looks at issues of prose from the inside out, focusing on issues of style, structure, usage, and revision. Typical writing assignments include fairy tales, short stories, personal essays, new journalism and cultural criticism. Students also work as editors, pouring over their own and others' manuscript with an eye on style and revision.

ENGL  361 - Intro to Writing Fiction (4)

What makes literary fiction "fiction"? What makes it "literary"? Why do we read and write it? What are our expectations of it? In this course, we will focus on an exploration of the various technical, stylistic, aesthetic, ethical, and formal aspects of literary short fiction, novellas, and novels. Students wil read a diverse range of short and long fiction, which may include writings by Woolf, Duras, Doctorow, Wideman, Chekhov, Wharton, and Carver, and will respond to the writings both critically and creatively.

ENGL  362 - Intro to Writing Poetry (4)

An introduction to Poetry as a Genre. Students will be required to read classic examples of narrative, dramatic and lyric poetry, as well as poems from the Romantic period to present day. This course examines the development of poetry and explores issues of rhetorical structures, closed and open forms, prosody, diction and audience. requirements will include writing assignments of both the creative and analytical varieties, as well as exams.

ENGL  363 - Intro to Writing Drama (4)

A history of the development of Drama as a Genre, from antiquity to present day. Students will be required to read examples from a range of dramatic periods and styles, which might include Greek Tragedy, Elizabethan Comedy, French Farce, Restoration Comedy, Realistic Dramas, Social Dramas, Absurdist Theatre and Experimental Theatre. Requirements will include writing assignments of both the creative and analytical varieties, as well as exams.

ENGL  364 - Intro to Writing Oral History (4)

In this service-learning course, students will discuss and grapple with the issues and responsibilities of collecting and creating oral histories, nonfiction narratives and profiles. Proceeding from the premise that ordinary people have within them extraordinary stories, students will study the craft of the interview and the oral history, and discuss inherent issues of documentation, exploitation, confidentiality, authorship and more. In class, students will read published examples of oral histories, practice interview techniques and discuss supplementary research methods as they collect, transcribe, edit and revise “untold stories” in a variety of forms. This class is also a designated Service Learning (SL) class. Each student will dedicate a minimum of 25 hours during the semester to service.

ENGL  370 - Ethics, Writing and Culture (4)

This course focuses on the political and social questions surrounding writing and publishing. Students study issues of censorship, racism, sexism, and social responsibility both within the publishing world and recent literatures. The course looks at how novels, poems, essays, and columns have altered and influenced contemporary culture, exploring the responsibility of the writer to his or her audience.

ENGL  390 - Critical Analysis (4)

This course builds on the analytical and critical skills developed in English 190 and 191 through examination of the major methodologies of Twentieth Century literary theories. Offered every Fall.

ENGL  398 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Offered every semester.

ENGL  399 - Critical Analysis (4)

This course builds on the analytical and critical skills developed in English 190 and 191 through examination of the major methodologies of Twentieth Century literary theories. Offered every Fall.

ENGL  400 - Special Topics in Writing (4)

Advanced seminar in writing that requires students to produce writing suitable for publication. A close attention will be paid to issues of style, rhetorical strategies and audience. Recent topics include Writing and Popular Culture, Gender and Sexuality and Writing and Social Change. Course may be taken more than once with a different topic.

ENGL  405 - Capstone Seminar; Asian American Studies (4)

As the culmination of the certificate program in Asian American studies, this course requires students to integrate the content and models of core and elective courses into a coherent grid of analysis and agenda for social action. A primary component of this course will be service-learning activities in collaboration with local and regional Asian Pacific American community agencies. Students will be required to submit a capstone portfolio, including a thesis paper, at the end of the semester that integrates their service-learning experiences with their academic foundation. Offered Spring 2003.

ENGL  410 - Special Topics in Literature and Film (4)

A varying series of topics examined by means of critical theory and research methods. Offered every year.

ENGL  450 - Advanced Workshop in Creative Writing: Fiction (4)

A workshop designed to give students a stronger understanding of fiction writing and revision processes. Exit requirement is a portfolio of new, original, and revised work. Non-majors welcome with the permission of the instructor.

ENGL  460 - Advanced Workshop in Creative Writing: Poetry (4)

A workshop designed to give students a stronger understanding of poetry writing and revision processes. Exit requirement is a portfolio of new, original, and revised work.

ENGL  470 - Advanced Workshop in Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4)

A workshop designed to give students a stronger understanding of nonfiction writing and revision processes. Exit requirement is a portfolio of new, original, and revised work. Offered once every three semesters.

ENGL  480 - Internships in Writing (SL) (1 - 4)

Internships introduce and acclimate students to professional opportunities in writing. May be directed toward professional work or service. Offered every Spring. Prerequisite: ENGL 192
Restricted to English majors

ENGL  490 - Senior Seminar in Literature (4)

A course which integrates the knowledge and skills derived from previous work in a significant research project. Work is submitted to both the instructor and an outside reader. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to English majors; Senior class

ENGL  491 - Senior Seminar in Writing (4)

A course which integrates the knowledge and skills derived from previous work in a significant creative writing portfolio or research project. Work is submitted to both the instructor of record and an outside reader. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to English majors; Senior class