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Arts and Sciences Graduate Course List

APS  601 - Comparative Modernization of East Asia (4)

The historical process of political and social modernization in China, Japan, and Korea. Emphasis is on the evolution of traditional societies in the classical and medieval periods, and their trans-formation in the modern era.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  602 - Asia-Pacific Policy Challenges and Solutions: Human Security and Non-State Actors (4)

This seminar explores challenges to human security in the Asia-Pacific region, and draws on insights from both academic texts and accomplished practitioners to help students create innovative solutions to such challenges.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  605 - Cult of Asia: Rel and Phil (4)

The religious and philosophical traditions of China, Japan, and Korea, especially as they affect the lives of contemporary East Asians. Emphasis is on the development of Confucian, Taoist, Buddhist and other schools of thought, and the story of how they shaped and were in turn shaped by the cultures of the region.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  610 - Core Asian Language I (Japanese) (4)

Intended to lay a firm foundation for further learning in the target language, or to solidify language competency previously acquired. Students who come to the program with some Asian language competence will be accommodated in a class at the appropriate level wherever possible.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  611 - Core Asian Language 2 (Japanese) (4)

Intended to build on the language competence developed in the first semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  612 - Asian Language Intensive Summer Session (Japanese) (4)

Free of the demands of a seminar class, students concentrate on improving basic skills in their target language in two weekly evening sessions over eight weeks.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  620 - International Politics of the Asia Pacific (4)

Comparative analysis of the modern international politics of Japan, Korea, 'Greater' China, Southeast and South Asia. Emphasis is on regional and international political developments, examining national policies and strategies used to compete and cooperate while assuring security.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  621 - Core Asian Language I (Mandarin Chinese) (4)

Intended to lay a firm foundation for further learning in the target language, or to solidify language competency previously acquired. Students who come to the program with some language competence will be accommodated in a class at the appropriate level.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  622 - Core Asian Language 2 (Mandarin Chinese) (4)

Intended to build on the language competence developed in the first semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  623 - Asian Language Intensive Summer Session (Mandarin Chinese) (4)

Free of the demands of a seminar class, students concentrate on improving basic skills in their target language in two weekly evening sessions over eight weeks.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  635 - Literature of East Asia (4)

Survey of influential traditional and modern literary works from China, Japan and Korea. Emphasis is on utilizing the lens of literature to examine the society it reproduces and on gaining an understanding of the role literary arts play in the cultural life of each country.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  636 - Society and Culture in the Contemporary Asia Pacific (4)

Comparative study of the social and cultural aspects of contemporary China, Japan and Korea. Emphasis is on the impact industrialization, modernization and democratization has had on cultural, social, and business practices.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  640 - Economies of East Asia (4)

Comparative study of the economic systems of East Asia with a focus on Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore. Emphasis is on East Asian economic developments in the 20th century.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  646 - Political Econ/Asia and Pac Rim (4)


Restricted to Graduate level

APS  651 - Pacific Rim Internship (1 - 4)

Students may elect to undertake an internship in an approved Pacific Rim-related company or nonprofit organization. This practicum will enable participants to gain in-depth experience and expertise in a particular profession through application of their knowledge of the Asia Pacific region and related language and research skills. The internship requires 20-25 hours of internship work for each unit of semester credit granted and the completion of a short paper on the significance and value of the internship in relation to the student's educational goals.
Restricted to Graduate level

APS  690 - Special Topics (4)


Restricted to Graduate level

APS  698 - Directed Reading (1 - 6)


Restricted to Graduate level

ARUP  600 - Latino Gangs in Oakland and SF (4)

Engages USF students in local, marginalized community issues.

ARUP  601 - Women, Poverty, and Catholic Social Thought (4)

The experiences of women migrants: how gender intersects with social justice issues (poverty, immigration) from the perspective of Catholic social teaching.

ARUP  603 - Zambia Today (4)

Explore the strength of a community working together (Ubuntu) to get beyond the AIDS impasse.

ARUP  604 - Public Health and Homelessness (4)

To work with the underserved in San Francisco, to witness and reflect upon this experience and their interactions with people who are in difficult, if not dire, straits, and to explore the factors that contribute to marginalization.

ARUP  605 - English Minga in Ecuadorian Am (4)

This graduate course is designed to become immersed in Achuar way of living and to work with Achuar teachers to develop an Achuar-centric English language curriculum, helping them attain their goal of self-sufficiency. Please contact professor to find out about the program cost.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  598 - Thesis Research for Biology Honors Program (1 - 3)

Prerequisite: Upper division standing, an overall grade point average of 3.2, plus a minimum 3.4 GPA in Biology and supporting science courses (Chemistry, Math and Physics), consent of instructor and department chair. Selected upper division students have an opportunity to work on a research project under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Units can be combined with 599 with up to 4 units counted towards Biology upper division course requirements. Offered every Fall and Spring.

BIOL  599 - Thesis Writing for Biology Honors Program (1 - 2)

Prerequisite: BIOL - 598 (or corequisite), consent of instructor and department chair. Thesis writing for research completed in BIOL 598. Offered every Fall and Spring.

BIOL  600 - Graduate Seminar in Biology (1)

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar with the faculty and other graduate students for presentation and discussion of current biological literature and research endeavors. May be repeated for credit. One meeting each week. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  610 - Genetics (4)

Basic principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics covering both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Three hours lecture and one hour recitation each week. Offered every Fall and Spring.

BIOL  610 - Genetics Discussion (0)

BIOL  620 - Molecular Biology (4)

Advanced study of the molecular basis of cell function, with an emphasis on the unifying principles and approaches that define the field of molecular biology. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently.

BIOL  633 - Endocrinology (3)

A study of basic endocrine function, hormonal mechanisms, endocrine disorders, and contemporary isuses in endocrinology. Four hours of lecture each week. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  634 - Endocrinology Laboratory (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 633. One laboratory session each week.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  641 - Medical Microbiology (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 642. An introduction to microbiology and survey of microbial pathogens, mechanisms of pathogenicity, and host responses. The emphasis is on microbes that cause disease in humans. Three hours of lecture each week. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  642 - Medical Microbiology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 641. One laboratory session each week.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  643 - Immunology (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 644. Introduction to humoral and cell-mediated immunity in health and disease, with a focus on cellular and molecular immunology and immunochemistry. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  644 - Immunology Laboratory (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 643. Principles of immunological techniques. A survey of those techniques used widely in diagnostics and research. One laboratory session each week.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  645 - Virology (4)

Structure, replication, and genetics of viruses with emphasis on viruses that infect vertebrates and dynamics of host-virus interactions. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  646 - General Microbiology (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 647. An introduction to microorganisms: structure, metabolism, and biological properties. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  647 - General Microbiology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 646. One laboratory session each week.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  648 - Advanced Human Physiology (3)

Survey of the function of the tissues, organs and organ systems in the human, with an emphasis on the mechanisms involved. Three hours lecture each week. Offered Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  649 - Lab in Adv Human Physiology (1)

One laboratory section each week. Offered Spring. Corequisite: BIOL 648.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  650 - Envir Animal Physiology (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 651. Principles of animal physiology and adaptive mechanisms. Three hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  651 - Envir Animal Physiology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 650. Project-oriented course with an emphasis on adaptive mechanisms and environmental toxicology. One laboratory session each week. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  654 - Endocrinology (4)


Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  655 - Developmental Biology (3)

BIOL  656 - Developmental Biology Lab (1)

BIOL  658 - Techniques in Light and Electron Microscopy (4)

Theory of light and electron microscope operation and preparation of biological specimens for microscopy. Offered every Fall.

BIOL  659 - Plant Physiology (4)

A study of plant growth and development, metabolism, nutrition, and response to the environment. Four hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  662 - Histology (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 663. A study of the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, and organs of the human body. Three hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  663 - Histology Lab (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 662. One laboratory session each week.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  664 - Techniques in Cell Biology (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 665. Principles and practices of laboratory techniques used in cell biology. Two hours lecture each week. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  665 - Techniques in Cell Biology Lab (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 664. Two laboratory sessions each week.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  668 - Neurobiology (4)

A study of basic neural function, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, disorders of the nervous system, and contemporary issues in neurobiology. Four hours lecture each week. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  670 - Biology of Cancer (4)

An introduction to cancer biology, including molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression, cancer diagnosis and treatment, and contemporary issues related to cancer. Four hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  679 - Conservation Biology (SL) (4)

A study of conservation biology, examining ecological methods for monitoring and maintaining biodiversity on the planet. Three hours lecture. Offered every Spring.

BIOL  680 - Special Topics (4)


Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  685 - Molecular Gen and Biotechnology (3)

Corequisite: BIOL - 686. Recombinant DNA techniques; methods of nucleic acid isolation and characterization. Two hours lecture each week. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  686 - Mol Gen and Biotechnology Labs (1)

Corequisite: BIOL - 685. Two laboratory sessions each week.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  690 - Marine Biology (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 691. A study of the natural history of marine organisms, exclusive of protozoa and insects, with emphasis on local intertidal invertebrates and fishes. Two hours lecture each week. (May be scheduled on Saturdays.) Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  691 - Marine Biology Lab (2)

Corequisite: BIOL - 690. Two laboratory sessions or field trips each week. (May be scheduled on Saturdays. Some weekend trips are required.)
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  695 - Directed Reading (1 - 4)

Offered every semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  698 - Research in Biology (1 - 4)

Offered every semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

BIOL  699 - Thesis Writing (1 - 4)


Restricted to Graduate level

BTEC  600 - Grad Sem: Molecular Biology (1)


Restricted to Graduate level

BTEC  601 - Biotech Internship Seminar (1)

Preparation for the internship in biotechnology (BTEC 697). Focus will be on how to manage the internship search and how to secure an internship position. Resume writing skills and interview skills will also be covered. Offered fall semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

BTEC  620 - Molecular Biology (4)

Advanced study of the molecular basis of cell function, with an emphasis on the unifying principles and approaches that define the field of molecular biology.
Restricted to Graduate level

BTEC  685 - Mol Gen and Biotechnology (2)


Restricted to Graduate level

BTEC  686 - Mol Gen and Biotechnology Lab (2)


Restricted to Graduate level

BTEC  688 - Adv. Research Meth in Biotech (4)

Prerequisite: BTEC 685/686. Advanced biotechnology laboratory-intensive course that uses a project-based approach to learning and incorporates an independent research component. Designed to prepare students for careers in research and biotechnology. Two laboratory sessions each week. Offered every Fall.

BTEC  697 - Internship in Biotechnology (4)

Professional experience through an internship in the biotechnology industry. Positions in professional biotechnology laboratories or academic research laboratories are obtained by the student. Internships are directed and evaluated by a faculty member with supervision of an on-site professional. A minimum of 320 hours for the semester must be completed by the student at the approved biotechnology-related venue. Students must complete an analysis paper, and oral summary presentation. Offered every semester.

BTEC  698 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

CHEM  630 - Spectroscopy (4)

A theoretical examination of various spectroscopic methods. Fundamentals of quantum transitions and spectral interpretation. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: CHEM 231, CHEM 340, CHEM 341.

CHEM  631 - Reaction Mechanisms (4)

A detailed presentation of reaction mechanisms in organic and inorganic chemistry. Rate theory, linear free-energy relationships, and photochemistry. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: CHEM 231, CHEM 341, CHEM 420.

CHEM  650 - Biochemistry I (4)

CHEM  670 - Polymer Chemistry (4)

A study of the chemical and physical properties of selected industrial polymers and biological macromolecules with emphasis on the relation of structure to function, methods of characterization, and synthetic design. Offered intermittently. Prerequisites: CHEM 231, CHEM 341.

CHEM  686 - Graduate Special Topics (3)

Topics not covered by other graduate level Chemistry curriculum offerings. Three hours lecture. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

CHEM  697 - Graduate Directed Study (1 - 3)

Study of selected topics, under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Written permission of instructor and dean required. Offered every semester.

CHEM  698 - Graduate Research Methods (1 - 6)

Study and hands-on instruction in current analytical, biochemical, and synthetic methods. Students will also engage in professional chemical literature searching, research documentation, and presentation. Offered every semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

CHEM  699 - Thesis Writing (1 - 6)

Composition of Master's thesis based on original research work completed under the supervision of a student's faculty research advisor. Written permission of instructor and dean required. Offered every semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  601 - Principles of Software of Development (4)

Prerequisite: Experience with an object-oriented programming language. A study of software development. Software engineering principles and structured methods are discussed as a prelude to the focus on object-oriented approaches. All phases of the software lifecycle are covered, including analysis, design, implementation and testing, and maintenance. Other topics include user interface design and development, software reuse and the design of reusable software components, software patterns, and web-based client-server programming. Four hours lecture. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  615 - Computer Architecture (4)

Survey of contemporary computer organizations covering early systems, instruction set design, processor implementation (pipelining, multiple issue, and speculative execution), memory hierarchy design (on-chip and off-chip caches, translation-lookaside buffers, and virtual memory), input/output (devices, busses, and processor interfaces), performance evaluation, and current research topics. Project required. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  620 - Network Design (4)

Overview of local and wide-area computer networks and contemporary lower-layer network protocols. Topics to be chosen from: switched networks, broadcast networks, multiplexing, layered protocol models, physical aspects of data transmission, data-link protocols, network modeling, performance issues, and current research in network design. Term paper or project required.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  621 - Network Programming (4)

Network application programming. Upper-layer protocols and their interfaces. Topics to be chosen from: TCP/IP, sockets, remote procedure calls, network management, client/server programming, internet protocols (FTP, SMTP, HTTP, and SNMP), higher-level interoperability (CORBA), performance issues, and security. Project required. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  625 - Parallel and Distributed Computing (4)

Introduction to shared- and distributed-memory architectures. Mechanisms for parallelism: locks, barriers, semaphores, monitors, message-passing, RPC, and active messages. Programming shared- and distributed-memory systems. Introduction to parallel algorithms and parallel performance prediction and measurement. Programming languages and libraries that support parallel and distributed computing. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  635 - Adv Systems Programming (4)

Prerequisite: requires knowledge of C/C++ and acquaintance with UNIX/Linux operating systems. This course focuses on advanced hardware and software topics in systems programming, such as device-driver design, interprocess communication, and kernel-module programming in the Linux environment. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  636 - Operating Systems (4)

Study of the design and implementation of modern operating systems. Topics chosen from: operating system structure, scheduling, protection, virtual memory, communication mechanisms, concurrency, threads, multiprocessor support, distributed systems, performance evaluation, and current operating systems research. Project required. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  640 - Bioinformatics (4)

Bioinformatics, one of the fastest growing application areas in science, is the realm where computer science meets molecular biology. This course will build on students' expertise in either computer science or natural sciences and prepare them to enter bioinformatics in either research or industry. Students will be brought up to speed in the content area which is unfamiliar to them. Students will be introduced to genomics, proteomics and software tools of the trade such as Pymol and Blast. They will learn bioinformatics algorithms such as dynamic programming, hidden markov models and monte carlo. Prerequisites: proficiency in one of the following fields: computer science, biology, chemistry, or physics.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  642 - Bioinformatics Research (4)

Bioinformatics, one of the fastest growing application areas of computer science and biology, is research oriented. Computer scientists provide their expertise in computation, algorithms and software design to biologists and chemists. Together they solve problems in biotechnology and create tools for scientific investigation. This course provides students with real-world experience in the design and development of a significant bioinformatics project. Our projects will be either research that may lead to publication, or creation of software tools for use by the scientific community, in partnership with industry. Prerequisites: proficiency in one of the following fields: computer science, biology, chemistry, or physics.

CS  652 - Programming Languages (4)

Study of the design and implementation of software development languages. Topics chosen from: syntax, semantics, translation, run-time systems, advanced programming techniques, and debugging. Language families to be chosen include: functional, logic, visual, formal specification, design, pattern, database, and concurrent. Project required. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  662 - Artificial Intelligence Programming (4)

Use of artificial intelligence techniques to solve large scale problems. Search strategies, knowledge representation, and other topics chosen from: simulated annealing, constraint satisfaction, logical and probabilistic reasoning, machine learning, expert systems, natural language processing, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and fuzzy logic. Both theoretical foundations and practical applications will be covered. Coursework includes written assignments and programming projects. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  673 - Algorithms (4)

Algorithm analysis and asymptotic running time estimates. Expected running times and amortized analysis. Design techniques, including divide and conquer, greedy, and dynamic programming. Algorithms for searching and sorting, graphs, and advanced topics. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  675 - Theory of Computation (4)

Topics to be chosen from: models of computation and formal languages, computability and complexity, P and NP completeness and P = NP, advanced computing models. Four hours lecture.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  680 - Web Systems and Algorithms (4)

Survey of Internet systems research including the anatomy of the web, search engine architecture and algorithms, information retrieval, crawling, text analysis, personalization and context, collaborative environments, and the semantic web.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  681 - Foundations of Security and Privacy (4)

This course explores the foundations of security in privacy, exploring the fundamental principles, formal models, frameworks, and theoretical results that underly modern-day security and privacy. The emphasis in this course will be on written assignments, projects, and exams.

CS  682 - Distributed Software Development (4)

Internet application development, including server-side technologies such as scripting languages, template frameworks, web page mining, and distributed computing issues such as peer-to-peer, multi-cast, and distributed agents.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  683 - Computer Security and Privacy (4)

Learn the basics of computer security and the details of important network security protocols such as SSL/TLS. Topics include: symmetric key cryptography, public key cryptography, secure hash, wireless security, spam filtering, biometric.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  684 - Human-Computer Interaction (4)

Design principles and techniques used to facilitate the interaction between people and computers. Topics covered include user-interface design and evaluation, web site design, prototyping, usability engineering, presenting complex information, hypertext, multimedia, scientific visualization, input devices, ubiquitous computing, and cognitive models.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  685 - Wireless Sensor Networks (4)

Study of the design and implementation of wireless sensing systems. Topics include communication, coordination, self organization, and energy e¿ciency. Necessary background material in networking and distributed systems will be covered.

CS  686 - Special Topics in Computer Science (1 - 4)

Topics not covered by other CS curricular offerings. Students may register for this class in more than one semester. Consent of instructor required. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  687 - Digital Society (4)

A study of the effects of computing and the Internet on modern society. Topics include digital librairies, e-commerce, copyright law and open source movements, on-line communities, education and technology, and privacy and security.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  689 - Residency in Internet Engineering (4)

Participation in a cooperative work program with one of the USF affiliated organizations. Typically, students will work in groups and be supervised jointly by both an affiliate manager and a USF professor.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  690 - Master's Project (4)

Prerequisite: Regular Status. At the discretion of the instructor, the project will be either a sponsored project for a commercial concern or or other institution or a research project. In either case, the project will result in the specification, design, and development of a significant software system with full documentation, an oral presentation to the university community, and a written report. Four hours lecture. Offered every semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  695 - Practicum Study (2)

Prerequisite: Practicum Option status. Participation in a supervised work program where students apply USF coursework knowledge in a practical setting. Work is supervised by a USF faculty member and a corporate sponsor.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  698 - Directed Reading and Research (1 - 4)

Written permission of the instructor, graduate program coordinator and dean is required.
Restricted to Graduate level

CS  699 - Master's Thesis (4)

Prerequisite: Thesis approval form required.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  600 - U.S. Economic History (3)

The growth and development of the American economy from colonial times to the present. The course emphasizes America's role as the first frontier economy to industrialize and its role as the only pre-WWI industrial economy with a frontier, as well as the growth of the giant industrial enterprise and wealth-accumulation over the last hundred years.

ECON  601 - Microeconomics: Theory and Applications (3)

Advanced microeconomic theory is presented to analyze behavior of consumers and firms under national and international market conditions. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  602 - Macroeconomics: Theory and Applications (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 615 Mathematics for Economists OR permission of instructor. Advanced theory in macroeconomics in the context of an open economy. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  615 - Mathematics for Economists (3)

Applications of linear algebra and calculus to equilibrium, dynamic, and optimization models of economic theory. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  616 - Special Topics in Mathematics for Economists (3)

Applications of differential equations, phase diagrams analysis, stability analysis, optimal control theory, calculus of variations, differential games, and dynamic programming in economics. Offered every other Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  620 - Graduate Econometrics (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 615 Mathematics for Economists or with permission of instructor. Covers the essential econometric techniques for economic and business forecasting and decision analysis: regression theory and applications, time series analysis, and forecasting. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  623 - Field Research Methods (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 620 Graduate Econometrics. This course is intended to be taken by Master's students in International and Development Economics in the Spring semester to prepare students for Summer field research. The course covers a variety of topics including sampling methods, field interview techniques, planning an empirical research strategy, ethical issues, importance of the protection of human subjects, and advice for maintaining proper health and safety during field research.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  624 - Internet Data Sources (3)

This course, intended for graduate students, will help students learn how to find and manipulate statistical and economic data found on the Internet. The course is an especially important tool for graduate students who are about to enter the job market in areas such as macroeconomics and finance. This course will teach students how to find and utilize data such as that measuring GDP, inflation, and unemployment statistics.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  625 - Econometrics of Financial Markets (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 620 Graduate Econometrics. A topics-oriented course exploring econometric issues and techniques specific to financial economics. Previous topics include facts of the Cap-M model and for random walks in financial markets. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  627 - Applied Econometrics for International and Development Economics (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 620 Graduate Econometrics. An applied econometrics course where students with a foundation in regression analysis learn to apply more advanced econometric techniques in their analysis of data. Topics covered include selection bias, simultaneity issues, panel data and time series regression.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  628 - Advanced Applied Econometrics (3)

Advanced Applied Econometrics covers recent developments in econometrics in the areas of instrumental variable and panel data estimation, discontinuity design, non-parametric estimation, and time series analysis with an emphasis on applications in international and development economics.

ECON  650 - Money, Banking, and Financial Institutions (3)

Pre- or Corequisite: ECON 601 Microeconomics: Theory/Application. Monetary policy, financial markets and institutions, competition, market efficiency, innovation and institutional changes, properties of various financial instruments, impact on savings, investment, and capital formation. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  651 - Monetary Economics (3)

Pre- or Corequisite: ECON 602 Macroeconomics: Theory/Application. This course emphasizes the institutional structure of banking, government regulation of banking, and government control of the money supply and economic activity. We focus on the needs and processes underlying money and financial markets to understand how and why financial markets and institutions are in a constant state of evolution and the consequences for effective government policies. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  655 - Options and Futures (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 615 Mathematics for Economists. Options, futures and other derivative contracts are widely used to manage risk by businesses and financial institutions. This course provides students with a solid understanding of 1) the economic functions of futures, forwards and options, 2) the operation of the futures and options markets, 3) the pricing of futures, options and other derivatives, and 4) basic strategies in trading options. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  663 - Experimental Economics (3)

This course introduces modern laboratory experimental methods to students with well-developed interests in economics and with an intermediate-level knowledge of microeconomics and statistics. The course will examine experimental techniques in detail and will survey recent applications in fields such as markets, development, choice under certainty and games. Students will use the lessons to conduct original research and set up their own experiment. Prerequisite: ECON 311 Intermediate Microeconomics OR permission of the instructor.

ECON  665 - Law and Economics (3)

Law and Economics offers master's students an understanding of how economic theory provides a framework to analyze legal systems. It will also teach students the fundamental importance of the law in fostering economic growth and development. The economic foundations of both domestic and international institutions will be studied extensively.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  670 - International Trade (3)

A comprehensive survey course in the theory of international trade and an economic analysis of international trade policies. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  671 - International Finance (3)

Pre- or Corequisite: ECON 602 Macroeconomics: Theory/Application. The world monetary system: foreign exchange markets, risk reduction instruments and international capital markets in the context of open economy macroeconomics. Evaluation of policies, practices, and institutions in the field of international investments and international finance. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  672 - Economics of Development (3)

Development economics: theoretical and empirical investigations of economic development issues, policies, and strategies. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  673 - Development Microeconomics (3)

Advanced economic development theory and investment theory in an applied context, with particular emphasis on current issues and problems. Offered every Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  674 - Development Macroeconomics (3)

Prerequisites: ECON 312 Intermediate Macroeconomics or ECON 602 Macroeconomics: Theory/Application. Quantitative economic techniques and computer software are used to develop simulation models, input-output models, and general equilibrium models for economic forecasting, business decision analysis and country-level economic policy appraisal and planning. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  675 - Finance and Investment in Emerging Economies (3)

This class will analyze the economics of foreign investment in emerging economies such as the newly industrializing economies of Asia and Latin America. Emphasis will be placed on understanding transnational capital flows, foreign direct investment, privatization of industry, the role of exchange rate and currency risk, and models of foreign portfolio investment.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  676 - Natural Resource Economics and Development Policy (3)

Signs of environmental stress and of the depletion and extinction of natural resources abound in developing nations around the world. This course is for graduate students, especially students in the International and Development Economics Master's program, and will examine the issues surrounding changes in the environment of developing nations during the process of industrialization, trade-offs between economic growth and resource depletion, and issues surrounding sustainable development.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  677 - International Political Economy (3)

In most developing countries today planned development is being abandoned in favor of market-guided strategies. This course provides a political economy analysis of the relationship between government and the economy in developing nations. It examines the various paradigms and debates in the field of international political economy, and with case studies illustrates how domestic and transnational political economic structures have shaped development patterns in diverse third world settings.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  678 - Advanced Topics in Development Economics (3)

Modern empirical approaches to development policy analysis, including intra-household resource allocation and gender issues; microeconomic determinants of fertility and population growth; labor markets in developing economies; schooling and education; and health and nutrition. Pre-requisites: Economics 672 and/or 673, 620. Economics 627 concurrent recommended.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  679 - Advanced Topics in International Economics (3)

This course focuses on current international economic policy issues, including the on-going global financial crisis, the challenges and opportunities of globalization for developing as well as developed countries, the stress in the current international monetary and trade systems resulting from the rapid development of India and China and the external adjustment problems of the United States, and the evolving role of the IMF.

ECON  690 - Development Economics Seminar (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 620 Graduate Econometrics. A capstone course which emphasizes economic methodology and economic research. All students will carry out and present a research. Offered every Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  691 - Special Topics in Economics (3)

Covers a variety of areas, the focus depending on the expertise of the instructor. May be repeated for credit each semester that a different topic is covered. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  696 - Internship (1 - 3)

Project report based on an internship program with a department of a business, industry, or government. Must be arranged with a faculty member.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  698 - Directed Reading/Research (1 - 3)

The written permission of the instructor and the dean is required. Must be arranged with a faculty member.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  699 - Thesis (1 - 3)

Directed research leading to the presentation of a master's thesis. Must be arranged with a faculty member.
Restricted to Graduate level

ECON  700 - Financial Reporting for IR (2)

Students develop a thorough knowledge of fundamental financial accounting principles and relationships. The emphasis is on the three basic financial statements ¿ the components of each, alternative accounting methods, and the relationship between the three statements. The goal is to understand the strengths and weaknesses of accounting procedures for measuring the true economic state of a company.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  701 - IR and the Investment Process (2)

We¿re often asked if we sell stock and the answer is, ¿No.¿ But we need to understand the process ¿ the mechanics of trading, different ways of investing as well as understanding capital markets, capitalization structures, the exchanges, the difference between buyside, sellside, bankers and brokers.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  702 - The Practice of IR (2)

Every day is different. An entire day can be spent making and returning calls after an announcement. Another day can be spent meeting with different department heads and conducting research. Learn the nuts and bolts of IR in this course.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  703 - Communications for IR (2)

There are many ways to communicate with investors¿phone, email, electronic, print. You will learn how to use different media to get your point across. You will also learn communications techniques when dealing with different events such as earnings, MandA, executive issues, crises, and other issues.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  704 - Corporate Governance and IR (2)

Corporate Governance is a hot topic. This course introduces you to working with legal departments in order to stay out of trouble. You will review cases where ethics and morality come into play. You will also learn how to work with the Board of Directors to ensure your company is transparent and compliant.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  705 - Writing for IR (2)

Analysts and investors are deluged with information. How do you write something they want to read, that has all the facts, and is compliant? You will learn how here.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  706 - Marketing Your Company (2)

Think of your stock as a product. Someone has to market it, and that person is you. We will look at understanding your constituents ¿ buyside, sellside, individual investors, and global institutions. Learn the essentials of marketing, including targeting and peer analysis, in the context of Investor Relations.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  707 - Disclosure/Regulatory Process (2)

10-Ks, 10-Qs, Reg FD¿so many acronyms. This course will demystify SEC documents and regulations, and ensure you know which to file to stay out of trouble. You will also have an overview of the court cases that have impacted IR, reporting requirements for the public markets, and your obligations as an IRO.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  708 - Investor Relations Capstone (2)

In this capstone course, you will take all the knowledge and apply it to a final project. The final project will be a formal IR plan for your company.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  709 - Investor Relations Internship (0)

This course allows students to receive credit for hands on experience working in an Investor Relations department of a company. The internship course is best if taken in the student¿s last semester as a compliment to the ECON 708 IR Capstone course.
Restricted to Investor Relations majors

ECON  710 - Microeconomics for Finance (2 - 3)


Restricted to Business Administration, Financial Analysis, and Financial Analysis majors

ECON  712 - Financial Markets (2 - 3)

An overview of the characteristics of financial markets including their structure and organization. We examine common models for pricing bonds and equities. We introduce the role of financial statements and accounting rules into the valuation process. The role of government regulation and its effects on financial innovation are analyzed.
Restricted to Risk Management, Business Administration, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Investor Relations majors

ECON  714 - Corporate Finance (2)


Restricted to Financial Analysis, Business Administration, Financial Analysis, and Investor Relations majors

ECON  716 - Macroeconomics for Finance (2)

The course examines the structure of macroeconomic relationships and the role of government in the economy. It begins with an overview of long run economic growth and its determinants. Short run macroeconomic fluctuations, investment and government policies are then investigated. The course concludes with an overview of international linkages between economies including the role of foreign exchange markets.
Restricted to Risk Management, Business Administration, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Investor Relations majors

ECON  720 - Equity Valuation (2)


Restricted to Risk Management, Business Administration, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Investor Relations majors

ECON  722 - Fixed Income Valuation (2)

A thorough and in-depth study of the structural features of debt markets. Term structure analysis of interest rates and bond valuation. Assessing sources of risk for debt portfolios, including the role of duration and convexity in evaluating the effects of interest rate changes. Credit analysis for corporate bonds.
Restricted to Financial Analysis, Business Administration, Financial Analysis, and Investor Relations majors

ECON  724 - Derivatives I (2)

An overview of derivative markets and instruments including options markets, futures markets, and swap markets.
Restricted to Risk Management, Business Administration, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Investor Relations majors

ECON  726 - Adv Financial Statement Analy (2)


Restricted to Business Administration, Financial Analysis, and Financial Analysis majors

ECON  728 - Finance and Ethics I (1)

Applicable laws and regulations including professional standards of practice, ethical conduct and professional obligations. Topics include conflicts of interest, insider trading, and an overview of presentation standards for portfolio results.
Restricted to Business Administration, Financial Analysis, and Financial Analysis majors

ECON  730 - Behavioral Finance and Risk Mgmt (2)

This course examines how limited information, limited attention and limited rationality impact financial markets. After a review of ‘heuristics and bias’ literature, we discuss trading strategies in markets whose structure give rise to momentum, bubbles and segmented markets with limited arbitrage.
Restricted to Risk Management, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Business Administration majors

ECON  732 - Derivatives II (2)

Analysis of fixed-income derivatives including custom interest rate agreements and analysis of interest rate and currency swaps. Analysis of equity options and warrants, hedging and hedging strategies.
Restricted to Risk Management, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Business Administration majors

ECON  734 - International Finance (2)

International financial systems and foreign exchange rate regimes. Foreign exchange market calculations and arbitrage relationships. Exchange rate forecasting methods. Study of currency strategies for international portfolio management. International CAPM models of securities pricing.
Restricted to Risk Management, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Business Administration majors

ECON  736 - Econometrics (2)

Probability models for portfolio risk and Value at Risk models. Simple Regression Models with hypothesis tests, goodness of fit, and testing for problems with the data or the model. Multiple regression models with applications to CAPM and portfolio management.
Restricted to Risk Management, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Business Administration majors

ECON  738 - Fixed Income Valuation II (2)

Valuation of advanced fixed income securities including collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs), other securitized assets, and collateralized debt obligations (CDOs). Emphasis is on using probability models in the valuation process.
Restricted to Risk Management, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Business Administration majors

ECON  740 - Capital Market Theory (2)


Restricted to Risk Management, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Business Administration majors

ECON  742 - Alternative Investments (2)

The course will cover a history of alternative investments/strategies including private equity, venture capital, distressed debt, hedge funds, real estate, commodities and leveraged buy-outs. The primary goals of the course are to provide students with an understanding of alternative investments/strategies, their uses in a diversified portfolio, ways to access the investments and appropriateness for different investor types.
Restricted to Risk Management, Business Administration, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Investor Relations majors

ECON  744 - Financial Econometrics (2)


Restricted to Business Administration, Financial Analysis, and Financial Analysis majors

ECON  746 - Portfolio Management (2)

Efficient financial markets theory. Asset pricing theories and models. Portfolio management policies for individual investors, mutual funds, and institutional investors. Asset allocation and general portfolio construction. Fixed income vs. equity portfolio management strategies. Risk measurement and management.
Restricted to Risk Management, Financial Analysis, Financial Analysis, and Business Administration majors

ECON  748 - Finance and Ethics II (1)


Restricted to Business Administration, Financial Analysis, and Financial Analysis majors

ECON  750 - Quant Analy in Risk Management (2)

This course provides the foundation for quantitative risk models. The course emphasizes important probability distributions for returns, statistical measures of risk and return, the estimation and use of factor models for analyzing risk. The course introduces the concept of Value at Risk (VaR) models as a unified approach to evaluating risk across a variety of financial assets.
Restricted to Risk Management majors

ECON  752 - Financial Markets and VaR (2)

This course examines the different types of risk that arise across a variety of different assets due to the characteristics of the assets and the structure of the markets they trade in. Advanced Value at Risk models that capture the non-linear nature of certain derivatives and market structures are developed. Scenario analysis is examined as a way to evaluate “one-off” risks as well as a way to stress test VaR models and their assumptions in extreme scenarios.
Restricted to Risk Management majors

ECON  754 - Market Risk for Fixed Income (2)

This course develops models for market risk in fixed income assets including mortgage-backed securities. The role of advanced derivatives, such as special purpose vehicles and collateralized debt obligations, in hedging these risks is explored.
Restricted to Risk Management majors

ECON  755 - Credit Risk Management (2)

This course investigates the role of credit risk in fixed income portfolios. Models of default and recovery rates, counterparty risk in derivative contracts, and products such as credit default swaps are developed to assess and manage credit risk.

ECON  756 - Operational and Investment RM (2)

This course emphasizes the development and implementation of risk management systems to measure and mitigate corporate financial risk exposures. The focus is the correlations across market, credit and operational risks and the allocation of risk capital across the firm. The importance of regulatory requirements (Basel II and Ill) in this process is emphasized.
Restricted to Risk Management majors

ECON  760 - Risk Measurement Modeling (0 - 2)

Develops advanced applications of the risk models developed in earlier courses. Applications include developing stress tests for VaR that meet Basel II and III standard scenarios, KMV models for credit risk modeling, risk management for CD’s and case studies in model risk.
Restricted to Risk Management majors

ECON  762 - MatLab for Risk Modeling (2)


Restricted to Risk Management majors

ENVM  680 - Special Topics (2 - 4)

A variety of specialty courses are provided to meet students' professional needs and address current environmental issues.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  680 - Laboratory (0)

ENVM  688 - Thesis Research (2)

Development of research problem and literature searches of research area.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  689 - Thesis Design (2)

Prerequisite: ENVM 688. Planning and methodologies of research design.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  690 - Research Methods (2)

Research Methods will introduce you to the nature and conduct of research in an environmental science and management context. You will learn the important processes of formulating a research question, developing a testable hypothesis, and justifying the proposed research based on a critical analysis of relevant peer-reviewed literature. You will also gain understanding of multiple research methods, qualitative and quantitative, the peer review and response process as it works in scientific context, as well as ethical considerations in research. This course will hone your skills in critical analysis, writing, and presentations, all essential for any environmental professional. This course will also facilitate your undertaking of the Master’s Project.

ENVM  691 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

Students complete a focused research project under the supervision of a faculty member. A completed report must be filed.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  698 - Master's Project (1 - 4)

This course is the capstone portion of the curriculum and is designed to give the student an opportunity to develop an in-depth study of a specific area within the broader discipline of Environmental Management. The project includes a detailed synthesis of the literature on a question of interest, as well as a professional presentation on this topic.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  699 - Thesis Completion (1 - 3)

Prerequisite: ENVM 688. Completion and presentation of thesis research.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  601 - Environmental Chemistry (2)

This course serves as an introduction to and covers broad aspects of environmental science and environmental studies. For all cases, the resulting environmental impacts are studied in detail. Specifically, this course examines the risks associated with growth in a developing world; environmental impact of population growth on natural resources; mineral and resource extraction; water resource uses; and renewable and non-renewable sources for power generation. Emphasis is placed on a holistic approach to environmental science using laboratory exercises, environmental surveys, and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Cross-listed With: ENVA 110.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  605 - Environmental Ethics (2)

A survey of the ethical issues facing the global/environmental community. Review of the foundations of ethical and environmental thought, and application of these perspectives to a wide range of topics. Topics include environmental justice, corporate responsibility, the shaping of a global community, valuing non-human species and biodiversity.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  606 - Environmental Philosophy and Ethics (2)

A critical analysis of values and traditions of environmental thought. The philosophy of environmental policy issues and ethical systems related to environmental thought.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  607 - Environmental Policy: Design and Implementation (2)

When is a discharge limit better than a concentration limit? Why use a risk-based standard rather than a technology standard? How do ideas of pollution prevention and market incentives get incorporated into policy? Why are some policies more expensive or more strongly enforced than others? We will explore these and other questions by examining the technical, political, economic, legal, and social bases for designing and implementing environmental policies. This course will provide students with a solid understanding of the broad features of existing US and California environmental policies¿their achievements and shortcomings¿and challenge students to think about the kinds of future policies needed to address environmental concerns.

ENVM  608 - Introduction to Environmental Politics and Policies (2)

A brief introduction to the institutions and forces which combine to make and implement environmental policy in the United States. An important underlying theme of the course is the role that democracy has, for better or worse, on policy making.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  610 - Market-Based Environmental Policy (2)

Prerequisite: ENVM 614 or permission of instructor. This course surveys environmental management policies that use the incentive structure of our market economy. We start with a survey of traditional direct environmental policies and then juxtapose them with incentive or market-based policies, such as taxes, subsidies and tradable emissions permits.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  611 - Ecoscience (2)

Examines basic principles of environmental science and evaluates large-scale human impacts to the global ecosystem.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  613 - Environmental Law (2)

A survey of the requirements of state and federal laws dealing with impacts on the natural environment and human health. Legal theory and case applications are reviewed.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  614 - Environmental Economics I (2)

Survey of the principles of economics as they apply to environmental management. The principles of cost-benefit analysis are applied to evaluating the impacts of sustained growth and development.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  620 - Applied Ecology (2)

An introduction to basic ecological concepts through their application to environmental management problems. The course will evaluate a series of case studies and scientific literature covering ecosystem management, watersheds, habitat restoration, endangered species, and other topics.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  621 - Restoration Ecology (2)

Prerequisite: ENVM 611. An overview of concepts and practices in restoration ecology. Emphasis will be on the application of ecological principles to restoration design, implementation, and monitoring.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  622 - Restoration Ecology Lab (2)

Prerequisite: ENVM 620. This laboratory course is a companion to ENVM 621 and will emphasize field and laboratory analyses of restoration projects, involving one lab meeting per week.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  624 - Environmental Planning (2)

This course provides an overview of the principles and practices of environmental planning at the federal, state and local level. Course work focuses on planning theory, case studies, and applicable analytical methods.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  626 - Wetland Ecology (2)

An introduction to wetland ecosystems, including hydrology, soils, vegetation, and animals. The course will include a survey of wetland types from vernal pools to tidal salt marshes and a review of wetland policy and management.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  627 - Wetland Ecology Lab (2)

This laboratory course is a companion to ENVS 626 and will emphasize field and laboratory analyses of wetland ecosystems. Students will learn sampling techniques and data analysis for wetland hydrology, soils and plants.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  628 - Riparian Ecology (2)

An overview of the ecology and management of riparian ecosystems. The course will cover the basic ecological processes that drive the formation and restoration of riparian areas; ecological services provided by riparian areas; and relevant regulatory requirements and issues.

ENVM  630 - Hydrogeology (2)

Hydrogeology introduces students to ground water flow and related environmental applications. There is an emphasis on gaining intuitive insight through quantitative understanding and practiced examples. Some particular topics include Darcy's Law, field assessment techniques, and ground water resource management.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  631 - Water Quality Assessment and Management (2)

This course covers broad aspects of water quality in fresh water environments. The principle goal of this course is to provide students with the necessary understanding of water resources, uses, impacts on quality, and regulations so that they may manage water use policies by considering planned uses and interpretation of water quality data.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  633 - Air Quality Assessment and Management (2)

This course aims to introduce students to air quality management and some of the challenges involved. The course looks at the framework for air quality management, including current challenges, regulations, and meteorological and topographic impacts. It then examines various air pollution control strategies for managing air pollution.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  634 - Environmental Permitting (2)

The environmental permitting process requires the understanding of how the laws and regulations evolved. This course will examine the permitting process with the different environmental media. The interaction between industry, the public, and government agencies will be addresses as well. By taking this course, the student will obtain a firm understanding of how our current regulations were developed, and how permitting and enforcement provide for the adherence to these regulations.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  635 - Modelingand Environmental Planning (2)

Through reading, lecture, discussion, and individual projects, this course evaluates the types of models used for environmental planning and policy-making and introduces general principles for using and critiquing models. Students will develop modeling skills for uncertainty analyses, including sensitivity analysis. 
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  636 - Resource Management (2)

Provides an overview of the mechanisms for incorporating resource assessment data into resource management decisions within the regulatory framework.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  637 - Accelerated Introduction to GIS for Environmental Science (2)

This course serves as an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It is designed to provide students with basic concepts, principles and applications of GIS and their use in the decision-making process pertaining to natural resource management. Students will perform practical exercises using ESRI's ArcGIS software, the industry standard in GIS applications.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  641 - Environmental Health and Safety Management (2)

This course will provide the student with an understanding of the complex array of interacting, overlapping and sometimes conflicting laws, regulations, safety programs and compliance issues as they are translated into practical application within the work environment. Emphasis is placed on identifying regulatory programs, their major elements for implementation, as well as the compliance issues typically encountered.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  643 - Environmental Health (2)

Environmental health is the study of how physical, biological and chemical pollutants affect the environment and, in turn, human health. In many ways, concern about the health impacts of chemicals released into the environmental was the original driver behind the environmental movement in this country and remains a critical consideration in many aspects of environmental management. Despite wide-spread concern about the effects of exposure, chemicals are pervasive. There are over 600 distinct (and mostly unidentified) compounds in a cup of coffee. Should we be worried? Furthermore, chemicals are not the only type of pollution. We will discuss biological pollution, including invasive species and pathogens. The reemergence of old diseases and the emergence of new ones is a major concern, given global change. Another major focus of this course will be endocrine disruptors. We will compare emerging endocrine disruptors to the classic case of tributyl tin and discuss whether pesticides such as atrazine should be managed similarly to tributyl tin. We will also look at wastewater treatment plants as a potential source of environmental estrogens, and evaluate their impacts through a trip to a wastewater treatment plant.

ENVM  644 - Environmental Toxicology (2)

This course investigates the impacts pollutants have on the structure and function of ecosystems and human health. The conceptual framework of environmental toxicology will be used as a basis for probing various aspects of environmental health. Some of the fundamentals to be covered include environmental chemodynamics, abiotic- and bio-transformations, and distribution (toxicokinetics), and intoxication mechanisms and the expression of toxic action (toxicodynamics).
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  645 - Environmental Health and Epidemiology (2)

The focus of the course is on the study of chemical, bacteriological and viral agents found in the environment that affect human populations. Students will gain applied knowledge of the basis of environmental health and epidemiology in a unified way.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  646 - Resource Assessment (2)

Provides an overview of the mechanisms for incorporating resource assessment data into resource management decisions within the regulatory framework.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  647 - Environmental Risk Mgmt (2 - 3)

Examines the use of risk analysis to make decisions in the face of uncertain adverse events. Beginning with a brief overview of social theories of risk, the course will cover project-based risk management, environmental risk considerations in policy making, and risk communication.

ENVM  648 - Environmental Risk Assessment (2)

Examines the use of risk analysis to make decisions in the face of uncertain adverse events. Beginning with a brief overview of social theories of risk, the course will cover project-based risk management, environmental risk considerations in policy making, and risk communication.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  649 - Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Quantitative Methods (2)

Covers the principles and methods used in evaluating human health risks from environmental hazards, including quantitative and qualitative aspects of hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  650 - Industrial Ecology and Sustainability (2)

Covers the relevant statistical and quantitative methods for calculating risks associated with engineered and other human activities and natural adverse events.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  651 - Energy Resources and Environment (2)

This course examines present and potential future energy trends. Energy usage and its impact on the environment are emphasized, as well as economic, technical, and political issues.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  653 - Management of Chemical and Hazardous Waste Materials (2)

Practical aspects of hazardous material and waste management in industry and other components of society, and resource recovery of hazardous waste streams.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  654 - Environmental Engineering I: Pollutant Fate and Transport in Surface Water and Air (2)

Engineering principles are used to examine and understand pollutant transport in surface water and the atmosphere.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  655 - Environmental Engineering II: Contaminant Transport in Ground Water (2)

Prerequisite: ENVM 654. Engineering principles and techniques from ENVM 654 are expanded and used to examine and understand pollutant transport in groundwater.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  656 - Engineering Aspects of Hazardous Waste Management (2)

Physical, chemical, and biological control technologies of solid and hazardous waste generation, transport and siting.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  661 - Environmental Accounting (2)

This course is an introduction to both financial and managerial accounting concepts as currently practiced in American business. The emphasis is on how environmental issues are reflected in the annual report and in internal decision-making.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  671 - Climate Change: Global Processes and Ecological Perspectives (2)

Prerequisite: ENVM 611. Overview of atmospheric and oceanic processes that regulate climate, including methods used to reconstruct past climates, and consideration of earth's dynamic environmental history relative to past and potential climate change impacts on the biosphere.
Restricted to Graduate level

ENVM  672 - Climate Change Mitigation (2)

Recognizing that human activity is altering the earth¿s climate, this course focuses on climate change mitigation¿options for changing human activities and reducing emissions of greenhouse gasses to avert negative climate change impacts. Working seminar-style, we will examine efforts to develop and implement climate policies at multiple levels: international agreements (e.g., United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Kyoto Protocol, current COP agreements, alternative agreements), regional policies (e.g., European Union), and US national and state policies (especially California). We will also discuss non-governmental and private sectors efforts on climate change mitigation. To understand the structure and effectiveness of different agreements, we will examine major sources of greenhouse gas emissions and ways of reducing them, ranging from automobile fuel economy standards to carbon caps and trading mechanisms. Course readings, the latest climate news, and current research will inform our discussion.

ESL  601 - Graduate Writing/Speaking Practicum (3 - 4)

Focus on academic writing and speaking skills needed by graduate students. Cross-listed With: ESL 030/601.
Restricted to Graduate level

ESL  699 - Directed Study - Matriculated (1 - 4)


Restricted to Graduate level

INTD  698 - Directed Study (1 - 4)

MAIS  601 - International Studies:Themes, Theories and Perspectives (4)

This foundational seminar provides an interdisciplinary survey of major approaches, theories, issues, debates, and methodological tools in the field of International Studies.
Restricted to Graduate level; International Studies majors

MAIS  602 - History and Politics of Global Issues (4)

This seminar examines the majors events, actors, and global processes of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries with emphasis on political and diplomatic history.
Restricted to Graduate level; International Studies majors

MAIS  603 - Human Rights and International Law (4)

A seminar that examines the major issues and controversies in international human rights, including their history and development, cultural and ideological distinctions; their role in international law, international relations theory, and foreign policy; their relevance to governmental and non-governmental institutions; and their relationship to the causes and consequences of terrorism.
Restricted to Graduate level; International Studies majors

MAIS  611 - Globalization, Development and the Environment (4)

This seminar explores the phenomenon of globalization, its impact on economic development and environmental resources, and transnational resistance movements.
Restricted to Graduate level; International Studies majors

MAIS  612 - Politics of Conflict and Peace (4)

This seminar explores the political, economic, social and environmental factors associated with transnational conflicts and assesses different approaches to conflict resolution.
Restricted to Graduate level; International Studies majors

MAIS  613 - Research and Thesis Writing (4)

Each student completes a course in a specified world region of interest: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, or the Middle East.

MAIS  614 - International Studies Master's Research Project or Thesis (4)

Students receive guidance and supervision in completing their own research projects. In the final semester of the program, students present their research to faculty members.
Restricted to Graduate level

MAIS  690 - Special Topics (4)

MAIS  698 - Directed Reading (1 - 4)

MFA  600 - The First Person: Autobiographical Writing (1 - 3)

A six-week intensive that explores how writers across the genres of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry transform personal experiences and perspectives into a work of art by finding the right form for the idea. Exploring work in all three genres, the course analyzes how form serves meaning in literary works and in students’ own writing. Required first course for all students. Offered in the summer preceding the first school year.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  612 - Writing Workshop I (3)

The first of four workshops in long fiction, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students share their writing and critique the writing of other students working in their genre. Offered in the Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  622 - Writing Workshop II (3)

The second of four workshops in long fiction, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students share their writing and critique the writing of other students working in their genre. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  632 - Writing Workshop III (3)

The third of four workshops in long fiction, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students share their writing and critique the writing of other students working in their genre. Offered in the Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  642 - Writing Workshop IV (3)

The fourth of four workshops in long fiction, short fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students share their writing and critique the writing of other students working in their genre. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  650 - Word for Word: The Texture of Language (3)

Examines the inventive use of diction, syntax, punctuation, and cadence by writers in all genres. Students study the impact of language use on literary meaning and apply new linguistic strategies to their own writing. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  651 - Developments in the Novel (3)

Emphasizes a variety of traditions in long fiction. Historical developments may include the picaresque, social or psychological realism, stream of consciousness, the nouveau roman, and postmodernism. By studying works of long fiction, students discover the forms and craft elements best suited to what they want to express. Offered in the Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  653 - Research for Writers (3)

This course is a practical introduction to research techniques and strategies for writers of literary prose. Designed for nonfiction and fiction writers, its fundamental objective is to teach students how to conduct print and first-person research and to understand exactly how such research will benefit their writing. Writers of historical fiction, novels, memoirs, nonfiction narratives, and essays will find the strategies covered in this course germane to their work.

MFA  654 - American Poetry and Poetics (3)

The American tradition in poetry is explored, from Whitman to the present, with a focus on the historical development of poetic thought. The course follows shifting ideologies and social contexts, and examines the way literary schools and counter-influences charge each other, helping to create a new American poetry for the modern era. Students read both the poetry and poetics of selected authors, and work toward a final paper exploring their own poetics. Offered in the Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  655 - The Architecture of Prose (3)

A study of narrative structure, examining authors' strategies for building arcs of conflict, sustaining tension, pacing sequences of action, and achieving a sense of closure. By examining a range of literary models, students learn to plot the architecture of their own full-length manuscripts. Readings include works that adhere to a traditional narrative arc as well as those that use the arc as a point of departure. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  661 - Evolution of the Short Story (3)

Concentrates on varieties of the short story as exemplified by masters of the form. Readings are drawn from a wide range of short fiction in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature. Students read these literary models to gain an understanding of the form, and to apply what they learn to their own craft. Offered in the Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  662 - Contemporary Experiments in Fiction (3)

A study of experimental and radical approaches to fictional prose, encouraging students to take risks in their own writing. The emphasis is on writers who work against rather than within convention, and how they make meaning out of their departures from convention. Assigned readings make use of multiple perspectives, discontinuous narratives, and disrupted chronologies. Readings are drawn from writers around the world. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  664 - Poetry International (3)

This course examines major developments in modern world poetry by looking at a range of literary traditions and historical contexts of non-English-speaking poets. Though most work is read in translation, reference to original languages is encouraged. Students work on translating from chosen languages, and the class examines both the problems and the excitement of reading beyond one's borders. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  670 - Intention and Design in Prose (3)

This course examines how a writer¹s plans for prose narratives develop from idea to sketch to final draft. Close examinations of finished literary works in fiction and nonfiction are augmented by the writer¹s letters, essays, notebooks, preliminary drafts, and other aesthetic statements. Students investigate how sensibility is expressed by craft, with an emphasis on the process of composition and revision.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  671 - Techniques of Long Fiction (3)

What do we mean when we speak of the modern novel? This course engages students in close readings of several twentieth-century novels, examining how the shape of each novel works in conjunction with its meaning. Topics for discussion include the reliability of narrators, the ambiguity of endings, and the dominance or dissolution of plot. Offered in the Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  672 - The Craft of Short Fiction (3)

Focus is on the structures of short stories and novellas, looking closely at certain writers' approaches to narrative conflict, point of view, imagery, voice, and story length. The course helps students to appreciate the restraints imposed and the liberties conferred by forms of short fiction. Offered in the Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  674 - Prosody: The Meaning of Poetic Form (3)

An in-depth study of poetic elements, with an eye to the history and evolution of poetic forms. The class will look at the organizing principles of syllable, stanza, and line; of stress, meter, rhyme, and a variety of countings, as well as contemporary explorations of fragmentation, interruption, chance, and silence. Readings will be drawn from the ancients as well as from postmodern contemporaries, and will demonstrate a range of structural elements, both classical and radical. Offered in the Fall.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  675 - Teaching Writing (3)

A study of the methods, theory, and practice of teaching creative writing. Topics for discussion range from the philosophy of teaching to more specific issues such as designing a course, choosing class materials, responding to student writing, and meeting course objectives. The basic elements of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry writing are studied for the purpose of teaching across genres.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  679 - Thesis I/II (3)

Students work with an individual Major Project Instructor to formulate, plan, and execute the Major Project. Consultation with a Program Advisor is required. Offered in the Summer.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  680 - Style in Fiction (3)

This course explores the unique qualities that comprise an original style, and the relationship between form and content. Students conduct in-depth readings of novels and short stories in order to identify and employ the tactics used by prose stylists in fiction. Attention is also paid to the multicultural influences which affect a writer's stylistic choices. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  681 - Blurred Boundaries: Writing Beyond Genre (3)

MFA  683 - The Art of the Essay (3)

This course focuses on the history and development of the essay as a creative form. Included are a variety of modes: personal essays, portraits, lyric meditations, cultural investigations, and persuasive manifestos. Students learn to apply the structure and techniques of description, exposition, reflection, narration, and argument to their own short essays. Readings range from classical to contemporary and may include book-length collections.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  684 - Narrating Nonfiction (3)

This course focuses on a range of strategies for building longer nonfiction narratives: scene and dramatic structure, reflection and analysis, chronology and character, and the role of the narrator. Readings emphasize contemporary complete works, including memoir, narrative journalism, and other book-length forms.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  686 - Poetics (3)

The study of Visionary Poetries, focusing on Romantic, Mystical, and Ecstatic traditions from the Biblical era to the contemporary period. Students will examine texts and literary philosophy that encourage transcendental loss-of-self as a foundation of poetic practice, and adapt strategies for their own writing. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  687 - Point of View and Characterization (3)

An investigation of how literary fiction attains depth, and how complex layers of meaning converge in a single novel or novella. This course encompasses works noted for their psychological, social, intellectual, and spiritual import. Students undertake the study of this fiction to help them develop and advance thematic strains in their own writing. Readings include works in translation as well as those written in English. Offered in the Spring.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  688 - Finding Form: Novellas and Story Cycles (3)

This course is a study of two ¿in-between¿ forms in fiction: the story cycle (or ¿collection of linked stories¿ or ¿novel in stories¿) and the novella (or ¿long story¿ or ¿short novel¿). It offers models and strategies for writers interested in how plans for a novel might be compressed, conceptually and actually, into the novella, and for writers ready to multiply their short stories into a larger cycle. Means for finding the appropriate form for given material are developed, with attention paid to the evolving needs of character, setting, imagery, and theme.

MFA  689 - Thesis I (3)

Students work with individual Major Project Advisors to formulate, plan, and begin to execute the Major Project. Consultation with the director of the program is required. Offered in the Summer.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  690 - Special Topics (3)

These courses emphasize particular aspects of literary craft. In Intention and Composition, students examine the ways in which writers' conscious plans for their work are conceived in diaries, letters, and interviews, and how these intentions are realized in the final product. In The Architecture of Prose, emphasis is placed on strategies for developing complexity as well as breadth in full-length works of prose. Topics vary from year to year.
Restricted to Graduate level

MFA  691 - Constructing the World:Time/Sp (3)

MFA  698 - Directed Reading (1 - 3)

Written permission of the instructor, department chair, and dean is required. Offered intermittently.

MFA  699 - Thesis II (3)

Students work with individual Major Project Advisors to complete the Major Project. Consultation with the director of the program is required. Offered in the Summer.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  601 - Proseminar in Applied American Politics (3)

This seminar surveys the behavioral and institutional dynamics of American politics and public policy with an emphasis on the historical development of the American state, American political culture, and the role of civic engagement and political participation in politics and government.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  602 - Writing for Public Affairs Professionals (3)

This core course introduces writing styles and develops skills required for political professionals. The course includes components on press releases, speeches, talking points, policy memos, policy briefs, position papers, opinion editorials and grant applications. This is a writing intensive course.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  603 - Quantitative Methods in Public Affairs (3)

This core course explores the use of quantitative information and research in politics and public policy. Topics include general principles of quantitative methodology, causal reasoning, probability, statistical association, and hypothesis testing. Students will be exposed to appropriate statistical and database software and the types of data suitable for political analysis and on practical usage of these methods, including polling, voter targeting, and demographic segmentation.

MOPA  604 - Pub Affrs and Applied Demcr Thry (3)

This course provides an introduction to the range of ideas about the common good and democracy in the United States. Understanding the varied traditions within American political life illuminates why particular questions and issues consistently prove to be sites of conflict. The course also explores how these different traditions have been institutionalized in government practices, public attitudes and political participation.

MOPA  611 - Campaign Organization and Management (3)

Explores choices made by campaigns in staffing and managing a campaign and devising and executing a strategic campaign plan. Course topics include fundraising, field organizing, voter targeting, volunteer recruitment, polling and focus group methodologies, media messaging, and get-out-the-vote strategies.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  612 - Non-Profits and Public Policy (3)

Nonprofits and Public Policy explores the role of nonprofit organizations in the formation and implementation of public policy in the United States. Topics include an introductory review of public policy process, lobbying and advocacy, building organizational capacity to participate in public policy, government regulation of nonprofit organizations, developing advocacy campaigns, public policy analysis, ballot initiatives, ethics in public interest lobbying, grantmaking for public policy and challenges to nonprofit advocacy.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  614 - Strategic Communications (3)

This class develops skills for planning and executing successful strategic communications campaigns. Students will learn the fundamentals of developing and executing communicative strategies aimed at influencing—even shaping—the public sphere. Utilizing skill-based seminars, the course will delve into durable, constructive engagement strategies related to conflict negotiation and facilitation, crisis management (aversion and response), and media relations. Develops skills in various forms of communications.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  622 - Applied Political Psychology (3)

This course is designed to give students a practical understanding of how the media and political worlds interact on a day-to-day basis. Through projects based on real-world scenarios and discussion, students will develop a sense of what is required of a media strategist as well as research-driven concepts in political psychology that determine the success or failure of media strategies.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  623 - Urban Politics - San Francisco (3)

San Francisco’s political history is characterized and shaped by economic boom and decline. This course will examine the politics of economic development in San Francisco, with a particular focus on housing and the social consequences of economic growth in order to explore the broader dynamics of political conflict in the city, including the history of political organizing around neighborhood and district issues, and the difficult choices faced by those in public agencies or elected office.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  624 - Lobbying and Governmental Relations (3)

Explores the principles of, and skills required in, effective governmental relations and advocacy. Particular focus on lobbying, coalition building, messaging, American federalism and the practice of intergovernmental governmental between branches and layers of governmental institutions.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  625 - Grassroots Advocacy and Mobilization (3)

This course combines theories of political mobilizing with applications from grassroots organizing. Examines mobilization in the context of electoral and extra-institutional campaigns, and combines conceptual and theoretical notions of effective mobilization with practical skills in power mapping, organization-building, and leadership development.

MOPA  626 - Issue Advocacy (3)

This course is designed to help students learn the skills of collaboration, project planning and issue advocacy campaign execution. In this project-based course students work as a team to create an online presence for a selected policy issue and design a coordinated message strategy to create public awareness and advance the public policy agenda.

MOPA  627 - Urban Public Policy (3)

An introduction to policymaking in American cities, focusing on the central public policy challenges facing urban areas in the United States from a global perspective. Explores relationships between private economy and public policies in American cities; causes of urban decline and uneven development; and urban redevelopment and human capital policies. Includes development politics, land use, housing, transportation, and the political and institutional settings for policy making. Introduces concepts, theories, and techniques of policy, planning, and administration.

MOPA  628 - Campaign Theory and Practice (3)

This class will focus on the fundamental determinants of American elections and the margins upon which political professionals focus to influence election outcomes. Topics include public opinion, campaign messaging, and media effects. The course is taught by a number of high profile professionals with substantial media, political, and scholarly experience at the highest levels of politics.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  632 - Master's Capstone (3)

MOPA  641 - Leadership for the Common Good (3)

This participatory seminar course provides a theoretical grounding for public affairs professionals. The course is designed to integrate internship experiences with study, thought, discussion and reflection on personal, public, and professional ethics, leadership, and deliberative democracy. The seminar will include presentations by guest speakers drawn from the political and academic communities.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  642 - Masters Capstone Project (3)

Masters degree candidates will propose, design, and implement a substantial and professional-caliber project designed to integrate concepts, skills, and methods learned in their coursework into a written paper. Topics should be designed in conjunction with the internship experience and provide evidence to that the degree candidate has mastered the skills and knowledge learned in the coursework and can apply them to the analysis of a practical political situation.
Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  690 - Special Topics (3)


Restricted to Graduate level

MOPA  698 - Directed Reading (1 - 3)

MOPA  699 - Directed Study (3)

The written permission of the instructor and dean is required. Offered every semester.

MSAN  501 - Computation for Analytics (1)

An intense review of the elementary aspects of computer programming using both R and Python, and an introduction to a variety of numerical and computational problems. Topics include functions, recursion, loops, list comprehensions, reading and writing files, importing web sites, generating random numbers, the method of inverse transformations, acceptance/rejection sampling, gradient descent, bootstrapping techniques, matrix and vector operations, and graphics.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  502 - Review of Linear Algebra (1)

An intense review of linear algebra. Topics include matrix operations, special matrices, linear systems of equations, the inverse matrix, and determinants; vectors, subspaces, linear independence, basis and dimension, row space, column space, rank, and the rank-nullity theorem; eigenvectors, eigenvalues, computational methods for finding eigenvectors and eigenvalues, and diagonalization of matrices; the LU decomposition and singular value decomposition.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  503 - Introduction to Data-Driven Business Strategies (1)

An introduction to the history of “big data” and four ideas driving the revolution in data analytics: volume, velocity, variety, and veracity. Students will read current newspaper and journal articles, listen to guest speakers, and complete case studies. After finishing this gateway course, students should understand how businesses, governments, and not-for-profit institutions are creating stakeholder value by more effectively capturing, curating, storing, searching, sharing, analyzing, and visualizing data.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  504 - Review of Probability and Statistics (1)

An intense review of elementary probability and statistics. Topics include random variables, probability mass functions, density functions, the cumulative distribution function, moments, maximum likelihood estimation, and the method of moments; one- and two-sample hypothesis tests and confidence intervals involving proportions, means, and correlation coefficients; the axioms of Kolmogorov, independence, the law of total probability, and Bayes’ Theorem; and multivariate distributions, indicator random variables, and conditional expectation.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  601 - Linear Regression Analysis (2)

This course is an intensive introduction to linear models, with a focus on both principles and practice. Examples from finance, business, marketing and economics are emphasized. Large data sets are used frequently. Topics include simple and multiple linear regression; weighted, generalized, and outlier-resistant least squares regression; interaction terms; transformations; regression diagnostics and addressing violations of regression assumptions; variable selection techniques like backward elimination and forward selection, and logit/probit models. Statistical packages include R and SAS.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  603 - Business Strategies for Big Data (2)

In this course, students will read case studies and hear from guest speakers about challenges and opportunities generated by the advent of “big data.” Students will make group presentations and write critical response papers related to these case studies. Students will consider some of the traditional business frameworks (e.g., SWOT analysis) for evaluating the strategic opportunities available to a company in the “big data” space.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  604 - Time Series Analysis for Business and Finance (2)

A survey of the theory and application of time series models, with a particular emphasis on financial and business applications (e.g., exchange rates, sales data, Value-at-Risk, etc.). Tools for model identification, estimation, and assessment of are developed in depth. Smoothing methods and trend/seasonal decomposition methods are covered as well, including moving average, exponential, Holt-Winters, and Lowess smoothing techniques. Finally, volatility clustering is modeled through ARCH, GARCH, EGARCH, and GARCH-in-mean specifications. Statistical packages include R and SAS.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  605 - Practicum I (1)

Provides both skills and experience in working with clients and opportunities to practice the professional skills required by business. The course features frequent presentations by program partners about real analytical problems and how they are addressed. The course features significant one-on-one mentoring and integration of topics presented in program’s courses.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  610 - Business Communications for Analytics (2)

In this course, students will learn essential concepts related to business communication and, in particular, the communication of technical material. Students will learn how to competently create, organize, and support ideas in their business presentations. They will deliver both planned and extemporaneous public presentations on topics related to data analysis, business, and economics. This course will particularly emphasize the creation of presentation slides and other supporting materials, the correct use of data visualization techniques, and learning how to listen to and critically evaluate presentations made by other students.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  611 - Intensive Project (2)


Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  621 - Machine Learning (2)

Algorithms to classify unknown data and make predictions. Support Vector Machines, kNN, Naive Bayes, association rules (a priori algorithm), decision trees, feature selection, classifier accuracy measures, Neural networks.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  622 - Data and Information Visualization (2)

This course will address basic information and data visualization techniques, as well as design principles. Students nwill primarily use R with the ggplot2 and shiny packages to prototype visualizations. Students will obtain practical experience with the presentation of complex visual data, including multivariate data, geospatial data, textual data, and networks and data.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  623 - Multivariate Statistical Analysis (2)

This course trains students in the use of multivariate statistical methods other than multiple linear regression, which is covered in MSAN 601. Applications to finance, social science, and marketing data are emphasized (e.g., dimension reduction for Treasury yield curves and consumer microdata). Topics include factor analysis, linear and nonlinear discriminant analysis, ANOVA and MANOVA, regression with longitudinal data, repeated measures ANOVA, and both hierarchical and k-means cluster analysis. Statistical packages include R and SAS.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  624 - Marketing Analytics (2)

In this course, students will learn how companies harness their digital marketing data to drive insights that convert into better customer experiences. Topics may include survival analysis, longitudinal data analysis, heat maps, geographic information systems, fraud detection, and market basket analysis. Areas of application may include customer targeting, election management, and ecommerce.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  625 - Practicum II (1 - 2)

Students are placed with a client as part of a semester-long project with weekly deliverables and meetings. Continued mentoring and development of professional business skills are also provided.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  630 - Text Mining (2)

Deriving information such as sentiment from unstructured text like tweets or web documents. Distance measures for documents and email messages. Application of clustering and classification algorithms to high-dimension feature spaces from text documents.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  631 - Analytics for Social Networks (2)

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and methods underlying the field of social network analysis including network centrality, cohesive subgroups, structural and role equivalence, visualization and hypothesis testing. Emphasis is on students learning from analyzing data and answering empirical questions using routines written in R.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  632 - Practicum III (1)

Continuation of Practicum. Students also receive “soft skills” training in creating their CV, interviewing and networking, and study of the venture capital and startup process.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  690 - Introduction to Programming in SAS (2)

In this course, students receive a brief, intense, and focused review of programming in SAS Enterprise Guide. This review will augment the SAS training that students receive in other analytics courses, yet specifically prepare students to take the SAS Base Programming examination.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  691 - Distributed Databases (1)

Students create a distributed MongoDB cluster study partitioning strategies such as sharding and horizontal partitioning. Topics include SQL and NoSQL queries and data insertion.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  692 - Data acquisition (1)

Analysts spend the majority of their time just collecting data and contorting it into an appropriate or convenient form for analysis. In this course, students write programs to scrape data from websites such as Yahoo finance and you use REST APIs to extract data from Twitter. Topics also include log file filtering, table merging, data cleaning, and data reorganization.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  693 - Exploratory Data Analysis (1)

In this introductory course, students will learn to perform basic data exploration techniques in both R and Python, as well as manipulate unstructured text in these two environments. Students will learn elementary techniques for visualizing and exploring patterns in data while practicing basic presentation skills. Furthermore, students will understand basic text classification techniques, implement algorithms for sentiment analysis, and evaluate and compare classification algorithms.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  694 - Distributed Computing (1)

Big data does not fit on a single machine and analysts must resort to clusters of machines cooperating to compute results. This course introduces students to map-reduce systems such as Hadoop and domain specific languages such as PIG. Students learn to re-express programs as map-reduce jobs and present them to environment such as Amazon's "Elastic Map-Reduce."
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  695 - Web Analytics (1)

The study of website traffic analysis for the purpose of understanding how visitors use a site or services. Topics include Google Analytics, A/B testing, and the analysis of incoming traffic characteristics such as client browser, language, computer attributes, and geolocation.
Restricted to Graduate level

MSAN  696 - Interview Skills (1)

Students learn how to prepare for an interview, successfully answer questions in interviews, and how to present themselves. Labs include interviews and answering technical questions quickly and accurately.
Restricted to Graduate level

MUSE  600 - Museums Study:History and Theory (4)

This foundational seminar provides an interdisciplinary survey of major approaches, theories, issues, and debates in the field of Museum Studies.
Restricted to Graduate level

MUSE  601 - Cultural and Financial Mngmnt (4)

This seminar provides tools for managing and running cultural institutions in the 21st century, including units on financial management, budgeting, fundraising, the visitor experience, human resources and strategic planning
Restricted to Graduate level

MUSE  602 - Museums and Social Justice (4)

MUSE  603 - Collections Mgmt/Preservation (4)

MUSE  607 - Museums and the Law Practicum (4)

Students explore the application of legal principles to museum practices through case studies and discussions. Areas covered include accessioning and de-accessioning policies, stolen work and cultural patrimony issues, tax and intellectual property concerns and the legal impact of technology and new fundraising strategies on museums.
Restricted to Graduate level

MUSE  608 - Museums/Technology Practicum (4)

MUSE  690 - Special Topics (1 - 4)

One-time offerings of special interest courses in various visual art areas.
Restricted to Graduate level

RHET  690 - Special Topcs (1 - 4)

One-time offerings of special interest courses in various visual art areas.

SM  601 - Managing Sport in a Dynamic Environment (3)

Evaluation of the impact of late capitalism on the production, promotion, regulation, distribution, and consumption of sport goods, services, and experiences. Focus on the new economy of themed entertainment, the changing geography of human capital, the landscape of postindustrial urban spaces, consolidation in the international marketplace, the mass customization of information, the value of branded spectacle, the impact of networked local/global technologies, and the formation of lifestyle identities. The role of ethics in culture and the marketplace.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  602 - Leadership and Critical Thinking in Sport Management (3)

Development of critical thinking skills necessary for success in the professional workplace. Specific examples in the sport industry and a survey of the sport marketplace will be examined. Among the skills to be analyzed and developed: effective communication; decision making; work environment analysis; political awareness; goal setting and risk taking. Exploratory research regarding opportunities in the sport industry. Case studies from professional and collegiate sports, fitness and sport marketing industries will also be included. The role of ethics in leadership.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  603 - Sport Law (2)

Foundations of the legal system and legal research. State, federal, and organizational regulation specific to sport. Focus on contract law, tort liability and negligence, constitutional law and discrimination, antitrust law, agency law, labor law, and collective bargaining. Skills focus on contract development, dispute resolution, management of risk. The role of ethics in law.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  604 - Sport Economics and Finance (3)

Analysis of supply and demand, market equilibrium, price and quantity as they pertain to sport. Market structure of sport leagues and study of competitive balance, revenue sharing, and salary caps. Techniques of economic impact and feasibility studies, valuation of sport assets, and financial analysis. Reasons for and methods of government sport venue financing. The role of ethics in sport economics and finance.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  605 - Sport Business Research Methods (3)

Principles and techniques of business research including development of research objectives, theories, hypotheses, review of existing research, methodologies, and data analysis. The course will also cover survey design, descriptive techniques, primary and secondary data collection, statistical analysis, hpothesis testing, report writiing, and the role of ethics in business research.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  606 - Strategic Management and Human Resources in Sport (3)

Strategic management and human resources. Understanding the value chain, competitive forces that affect a firm, factors that affect each force, strategic choices including low-cost leader and differentiated products, methods to achieve each strategic choice. Also, understanding groups and teams, negotiation, resource allocation, governance, recruitment of employees, training and development, employee motivation and compensation. The role of ethics in management and human resources.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  607 - Accounting and Budgeting in Sport (3)

Financial statement analysis and business plan development. Principles of budgeting including types, designs, for-profit, and non-profit. Applied budgeting for events, facilities, professional, university, and recreation. Cost-profit-volume analysis and breakeven analysis. Pro and collegiate sports accounting techniques including transfer pricing and depreciation. The role of ethics in accounting.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  608 - Internship in Sport Mgmt (4)

Professional experience through practicum or internship in sport industry. Positions in professional sports, intercollegiate sports, health and fitness clubs, arenas and stadia, sport marketing and management firms, and other sport entities. Directed and evaluated by a faculty member with supervision of an on-site professional. Students complete an analysis paper, and oral summary presentation.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  610 - Business Development and Sales in Sport (3)

This course offers a comprehensive understanding of business development and the sales process in the sport industry. Beginning with a fundamental overview of business development and sales theory and strategy, the course then provides sport specific insight into negotiation in the sport sponsorship process as well as ticket sales department structure, techniques, and strategies.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  612 - Sport Marketing (3)

Foundations of consumer behavior and sport marketing planning. Design and implementation of marketing plans. The integration of product, pricing, promotion, distribution, sales, sponsorship, advertising, and brand in the marketing of sport goods and services. Analysis of leagues, teams, events, properties, corporations, and manufacturers. The role of ethics in marketing.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  614 - Master's Project (4)

Students propose, develop, and write a Master's Project demonstrating research skills and understanding of sport management. The goal of the master's project, whether a research paper or professional document (e.g., business or financial plan, market research report) is to apply the cumulative curricular experiences to the professional objectives of the student.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  615 - Applied Sport Business Research (2)

Application of research procedures for student project. Analysis of data for description and determination of causality using statistical techniques software. Market research and validation procedures. Interpretation of results.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  630 - Global Sport Management Immersion Week (2)

Provides a sport-cultural immersion program in another country to learn about the global perspectives in sport management. Topics include: international sporting events, state-of-the art sport venues, sport business practices, sport policies, sport media and broadcasting rights, and sport management education.

SM  631 - Entrepreneurial Brand Building (2)

Focus on key principles and techniques necessary for building a business around a brand in the sports industry, based upon the experiences of successful sports industry entrepreneurs. Students will develop a business plan for an enterprise offering a sports-related brand.

SM  632 - Sponsorship Activation (2)

Focus on how to activate and evaluate sports sponsorships. Why do companies choose to sponsor in the first place? Which companies activate the best? How do these companies connect with consumers and leave a lasting impression? Do they see measurable returns?

SM  633 - Social Media in Sports (2)

Focus on Social Media in sports and how teams, athletes, organizations utilize social media to communicate, leverage, sell and monetize. We will examine strategies, best practices, case studies and tools used today to accomplish these goals.

SM  634 - Strategic Communications and PR (2)

Focus on strategic public relations and media relations initiatives and activities in professional and intercollegiate sports and related sports businesses. The course is structured as an interactive, hands-on experience with emphasis on practical application.

SM  635 - Sport, Society, and Culture (2)

How is sport linked to other institutions of society? What role does sport play in transmitting values to youth? Is sport really a microcosm of society? Sport will be used as a vehicle for understanding culture patterns and social problems.

SM  636 - Marketing a Professional Team (2)

Learn about all of the aspects of marketing a professional sports franchise including marketing to fans, sponsors, suite holders, using direct media, social media, CRM, pricing, promotion, product, public relations.

SM  637 - Event Management and Marketing (2)

A critical review of planning and evaluation theory applied to the practice of sport event management. Selected topics include critical planning techniques, the planning process, logistical requirements, risk management, contingency plans, facilitation skills, and event bids.

SM  690 - Special Topics in Sport Management (2)

Three elective courses such as the following: fitness management, facilities management, public relations in sport, sales management and techniques, entrepreneurship, event management, applied market research or consulting project, sponsorship creation, management and valuation, college athletic administration, brand management.
Restricted to Graduate level; Sport Management majors

SM  698 - Dir Reading/Research (1 - 3)


Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  600 - Sci and Method of Theology (4)

A study of the nature of the theological task, its branches, and its methods; examination of faith, revelation, tradition, hermeneutics, and religious language. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  601 - Principles and Methods of Biblical Interpretation (4)

A critical mastering of the scientific pursuit of exegesis and its application to Old and New Testament texts. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  631 - The Development of Dogma: Christology (4)

Traces the development of Christological doctrine from the apostolic age to the present; emphasis on the Patristic Period and on modern theology. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  643 - The Christian Church Through the Ages (4)

A survey of the history of the Church, with focus on men and women, movements and moments of major significance. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  644 - Church and Sacraments (4)

A graduate level study of sacraments as worship, faith celebrations of the Christian community, ritual actions. Historical and contemporary treatment of baptism, confirmation, Eucharist, reconciliation, marriage. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  650 - Methods and Issues in Moral Theology (4)

Catholic-Christian approaches to contemporary moral problems such as life-respect, religious dissent, and conscience formation. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  668 - Christian Mystical Classics (4)

A study of Christian spiritual classics of a mystical nature. The investigation will lead the student to appreciate those manifestations of spiritual experience which the mystics have in common and those that differentiate them. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  669 - Religions in Dialogue (4)

A study of contemporary faith, art, and culture as it interacts with world traditions and each student's unique religious position. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  695 - Special Topics (4)

Coverage of topics of special and/or current interest. Offered intermittently.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  696 - Directed Reading (1 - 6)

Written permission of the instructor and dean is required. Offered every semester.
Restricted to Graduate level

THRS  697 - Graduate Comp Seminar (4)

A personal systematic synthesis of all the courses taken by the student and a practical application of this synthesis to the student's particular area of emphasis.
Restricted to Graduate level

UA  601 - History of Urbanism (3)

Urbanization is defining the planet, crafting our landscapes, and shaping the political economies of social life. In this course we focus on the American city, considering the historical challenges of urban growth, the role of political power, and the importance of race and nature in shaping metropolitan space and defining the potential for social justice. Through studies of a range of urban contexts, this course explores the contours of urban decline and resurrection, grounding current debates in historical context.

UA  614 - Glob, Soc Justice and the City (3)

This class is an introduction to the critical issues in contemporary urban analysis. It explores the origins of globalization and its contemporary manifestations, including trade and investment policies, growing multinational corporate power, decreased relevance of political and institutional borders, reduced government regulation and the impact on local communities. Social, environmental and economic impacts of globalization are considered, as well as the origin and development of the concept of sustainability, and movements for social justice. The course incorporates perspectives from multiple disciplines: geography, economics, planning and sociology, in particular.

UA  615 - Critical Sustainabilities (3)

This course critically analyzes policy frameworks, political discourses, and development practices that seek to promote urban sustainability. Using historical and contemporary sustainability case studies, the course unpacks the changing logics of sustainability and offers an overview of key actors and trends. Drawing from scholarship in urban planning, geography and related fields, we will look at the impact of sustainability programs on a range of communities, asking: What is to be sustained -- and for whom?

UA  690 - Special Topics (3)


Restricted to Graduate level

UA  698 - Directed Reading (1 - 4)

URBS  602 - Issues in Am Urban Publ Policy (3)

In this service-learning course, students will discuss and grapple with the issues and responsibilities of collecting and creating oral histories, nonfiction narratives and profiles. Proceeding from the premise that ordinary people have within them extraordinary stories, students will study the craft of the interview and the oral history, and discuss inherent issues of documentation, exploitation, confidentiality, authorship and more. In class, students will read published examples of oral histories, practice interview techniques and discuss supplementary research methods as they collect, transcribe, edit and revise “untold stories” in a variety of forms. This class is also a designated Service Learning (SL) class. Each student will dedicate a minimum of 25 hours during the semester to service.