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Schedule

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Friday, April 26

9-10:30am
Opening Conference Session: Bodies and Prison, Intersectionality and Transformation

Workshop Description
Dr. Clarence B. JonesIn the first half of this workshop, we will be joined by USF Performing Arts Faculty Amie Espen-Dowling, Ivan Corado-Vega, and Reggie Daniels. These three individuals are all involved in the Well Contested Sites project, which uses a metaphorical, movement-based film to explore the effect of incarceration on individuals and suggests that the imagination can thrive even while the body is behind bars. In the second part of the workshop Corado-Vega and Daniels will join long-time, world renowned social justice activist Clarence B. Jones on a panel moderated by USF Vice-Provost Mary Wardell-Ghirarduzzi. Their discussion will focus on the intersection of social justice activism in terms of the seemingly distinct tracks of the Environment, Gender and Sexual Identities, Immigration, Race and Ethnicity, and International Conflict.

Presenters
Ivan Corado-Vega, manalive Violence Intervention Facilitator for Insight Prison Project & High School Services Director for Boys & Girls Clubs of San Francisco - Mission Clubhouse
Reggie Daniels, USF BA '11, MA '12, Resolve to Stop the Violence Project
Professor Amie Espen-Dowling, USF Faculty
Dr. Clarence B. Jones, USF Faculty
Dr. Mary Wardell-Ghirarduzzi, USF Vice Provost for Diversity Engagement and Community Outreach

Additional Information
http://vimeo.com/52877758
http://www.facebook.com/WellContestedSites

10:45am-12:15pm
Harnessing the Power of Digital Tools for Your Campaign

Workshop Description
From storytelling to communications to distribution, digital tools and social media can be valuable for grassroots organizing. How can students best harness the power of these tools for their campaigns? We’ll start with basic campaign strategy and translate it into online organizing, with a special focus on the campaigns platform Causes.com. Students will leave with a deeper understanding of the elements of a successful campaign as well as creative new ideas for digital outreach. The presenters, Jade Batstone and Emily Bookstein, are Campaigns and Community management interns at Causes.com.

Presenters
Jade Batstone, Campaigns and Community Management Intern, Causes.com, USF BA '12
Emily Bookstein, Campaigns and Community Management Intern, Causes.com

Additional Information
This workshop is especially helpful for organizers with current campaigns! Please bring a laptop.

10:45am-12:15pm
Diversifying the Environmental Movement


Workshop Description
The mainstream U.S. environmental movement has been criticized for its narrow conceptions of "environment" that speak to white middle-class notions of pristine nature. In this workshop explore what an environmental movement might look like that speaks to a more diverse population. How are issues such as inner city asthma rates actually "environmental" issues? How are war and conflict "environmental" issues? Can a broader, more inclusive environmental movement be built around the environmental justice movement? Are "sustainability" or "resilience" more useful concepts for building an inclusive movement that respects the interrelationship of environmental protection, peace, equity and justice?

Presenter
Professor Stephen Zavestoski, USF Faculty, Environmental Studies

10:45am-12:15pm
The State of Grassroots Organizing for Racial & Economic Justice in the US - A Report from the Field

Workshop Description
The Ear to the Ground project interviewed more than 158 social justice organizers and leaders in 30 communities across the country in 2012 -- activists on the frontlines of struggles around racial, economic and gender justice --- about this moment in history, the state of contemporary movements and what should be done. Join us for an interactive report-back on the results of this project.

Presenter
NTanya Lee, USF Faculty, Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good

10:45am-12:15pm
Militarization, the Prison System, and Authority of Opinion in Israel/Palestine     

Presenters
Rachel Nilson, Abraham's Vision VP '11-'12
Nadya Tanous, Abraham's Vision VP '11-'12

1:15-2:45pm
Immigration and Performance Activism

Workshop Description
This workshop will share ways by which performance activism has played a critical role in the immigration rights struggle. Presentation will include learning tools from the "Teatro Jornalero!," an immigrant workers theater in San Francisco, by its co-founders, as well as spaces for "hands on" participation.

Presenters
Professor Roberto Gutierrez Varea, USF Faculty, Performing Arts and Social Justice; Activist
Francisco Herrera, Musican and Activist; Director, Caminante Cultural Worker

Additional Information
hemisphericinstitute.org/hemi/
www.caminantecultural.com

1:15-2:45pm
Transforming the Impossible

Presenter
Professor Huda Abu Arqoub, USF Faculty, Center for Global Education; Abraham's Vision; Center for Transformative Education

1:15-2:45pm
USF Fossil Fuels Divestment Campaign: Organizing and Training (Part One)

Workshop Description
Join students organizing to launch a campaign for the divestment of USF's endowment from fossil fuel companies in this workshop will introduce you to the social justice dimensions of climate change, and more specifically to the implications of institutional complicity with corporations whose business model is premised on taking fossil fuels out of the earth and putting them into the atmosphere where they will lead climate and social disruption. This session will extend into the 3pm session as Deirdre Smith, West Coast Fossil Free Organizer for 350.org, leads the workshop in how to organize a campus fossil fuel divestment campaign.

Presenters
Ashlyn Ruga
USF Environmental Studies (ENVA) Capstone students
Deirdre Smith, 350.org Divestment Campaign Organizer

1:15-2:45pm
Global Activism in an Age of Poverty Porn

Workshop Description
Mama Hope's founding Director, Nyla Rodgers, will be leading a multi-media presentation about the evolution of development and the impact of the 'West'. USF alumni, Brianna Russell, and the Mama Hope team will lead a hands-on group activity focused on how students can alter the perception of foreign aid, African people and development. The goal is to help students identify the pitfalls of using the victim-villain-savior complex when working towards creating equality in a global society. In this workshop students will be educated on how to use the tools of the 21st century effectively as a global citizen without causing more problems to those directly being impacted by the international community.

Presenters
Nyla Rodgers, Founding Director, Mama Hope
Brianna Russell, Communications Director, Mama Hope, USF MAIS '12

Additional Information
Mama Hope is a non-profit specializing in development projects in Africa. Mama Hope works in close partnership with local African organizations to connect them with the resources required to transform their own communities. All projects are managed for and by partner communities themselves to ensure sustainability. So far Mama Hope has funded the completion of schools, health clinics, children's centers, clean water systems and food security projects.

1:15-2:45pm
The Parallels of the Persecuted

Presenters
Tala Dayyat, USF BA '14
Marissa Diaz, USF BA '14

3-4:30pm
Youth Organizing and the Struggle for Immigrant Rights

Workshop Description
This panel will be a conversation between Professor Hodoyan and several youth activists regarding how they became involved in their community, specifically on issues related to Immigrant Rights.

Presenters
Professor Karina Hodoyan, USF Faculty, Director, Chican@ and Latin@ Studies (CELASA)
TBD

3-4:30pm
The Right to the City: Race, Class and Public Space

Workshop Description
Our cities face continual challenges: development & redevelopment, swift migrations in and out, growing economic inequality, the tug between public and private interests, racial/ethnic tensions, economic booms and busts, and the pressures of climate change and other global forces. Using the San Francisco Bay Area as our case study, this workshop explores the contours of urban decline and resurrection, engaging with the intersecting policy debates and histories that make the Bay Area simultaneously dynamic and dangerous. Ultimately we’ll be asking: Who has the right to live, work, and play in cities – and what’s at stake in how we answer this question? Who has the right to the city?

Presenter
Professor Rachel Brahinsky, USF Faculty, MA Program in Urban Affairs

3-4:30pm
USF Fossil Fuels Divestment Campaign: Organizing and Training (Part Two)

Workshop Description
See workshop description for Part One of workshop with same title (above).

Presenters
Ashlyn Ruga
USF Environmental Studies (ENVA) Capstone students
Deirdre Smith, 350.org Divestment Campaign Organizer

3-4:30pm
The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Activism, and Slam Poetry

Workshop Description
The primary purpose of our Israel-Palestine conflict workshop is to have our audience understand this particular conflict as one of conflicting narratives. Through interactive activities, participants will explore their identities and passions while simultaneously learning about the conflict. This workshop is designed to allow participants the space to realize that one of the root causes of conflict is, in fact, competing narratives. The general idea of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can be understood through different means such as poetry, and relating it to scenarios on our everyday life.

Presenters
Jessica Hernandez, USF BA '13
Sarah Masoud, USF BA '14

3-4:30pm
Immigration Reforms in the U.S after WWII

Workshop Description
In this workshop I will examine two major immigration reforms implemented in the U.S after World War II. The first major reform was in 1965 during the Civil Rights movement, which abolished the racial quota previously imposed since 1924. However, this reform mainly focused on the family unification aspect of minorities and failed to deal with rising labor demands. The second major reform was implemented in 1986 under the Reagan administration. Although this reform provided a pathway to citizenship for about three million undocumented immigrants, it mainly focused on the militarization of the U.S-Mexico border. The main goal of this workshop is to examine the failures of previous reforms and what current immigration reform needs to address.

Presenter
Jung Gyun "Frank" Seo, USF MA '13

Saturday, April 27

9-10:30am
Opening Conference Session:
The Human Right to Grow

Presenter
Mark GonzalesMark Gonzales is a thought leader in using storytelling as a global health strategy. His ability to cultivate imagination, teach methodology, & curate stories across thematic lines has awarded him invitations to over fifteen countries, with previous clients that include TED(x) talks, Stanford University, Wehdat refugee camp, State Library of Queensland (Australia), the United Nations, & HBO's Def Poetry. He is often found poetically integrating narrative and medicine via twitter: @WageBeauty.

10:45am-12:15pm
Shylock, Identity, and Performing Prejudice

Workshop Description
Using a speech about identity, equality, mercy and vengeance spoken by Shylock, a Jewish character from Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice", this workshop will use literature and writing workshops to dig deeply into how those themes occur in every day conversations in social justice activism. We will explore how the differences in established identities can lead to the performance of prejudice and what it means to step back and look at all of what is involved in the creation of unjust circumstances.

Presenters
Ashley Smiley, USF BA '13

Additional Information
Participants are encouraged to bring something to write on and write with as this workshop will include writing.

10:45am-12:15pm
Countering Islamophobia & Combating Surveillance and Profiling

Workshop Description
This session will make connections between Islamophobia and the surveillance and profiling issues facing American Muslims today. From biased law enforcement trainings, to surveillance of religious and political activities and "voluntary" interviews imposed on American Muslims by the FBI, the civil rights of this community continue to be eroded. The presenter will highlight progress that has been made in challenging these erosions, both on a federal and local level with an eye towards the work of the Coalition for a Safe San Francisco in passing legislation mandating transparency in counter terrorism work occurring in San Francisco.

Presenter
Zahra Billoo, Executive Director, CAIR-SFBA

10:45am-12:15pm
USF Activism: Change Here from Here

Workshop Description
Social justice activism is an integral part of life at the University of San Francisco. But often our attempts to change the world are outwardly directed and overlook the need to "walk the talk" right here on our own campus. Join a group of students engaged in an attempt to prepare a guidebook for campus activism to learn about strategies for creating change at USF. In what ways do USF policies or practices perpetuate social injustice? What are the obstacles–institutional, cultural, or otherwise–to changing these policies and practices? Plan on leaving this workshop with answers to these questions.

Presenters
Morgan Fitzgibbons, USF Faculty, Environmental Studies, Wigg Party Co-Founder
Students from Fitzgibbons’ USF Activism class

10:45am-12:15pm
Transforming Narratives, Transforming Conflicts: How Personal and Cultural Stories Affect Intercultural Struggles

Workshop Description
How do personal and cultural narratives perpetuate intercultural conflicts? How are we shaped by the stories we're told and the stories we tell? In this workshop we will explore our personal narratives by sharing and reflecting on our stories. We'll attempt to understand the roles that cultural narratives play in our lives and on the greater global stage, and we'll discuss how our beliefs about genders, ethnicities, histories and nationalities have been shaped by the stories we experience on a daily basis.

Presenter
Amit Deutsch, Abraham's Vision VP '09-'10

1:15-2:45pm
Performance and the Creative Transformation of Conflict

Workshop Description
This workshop will focus on understanding the role of performance and ritual in addressing violent conflict in local and international contexts. Since ancient times, theater and ritual have been valuable tools in creating a language to "speak the unspeakable" for those most affected by violence, from wars to structural violence contexts such as racism, homophobia, femicide, etc. This workshop will also explore tools relating to how performance can help create a "safe space" to support victims and for reaching out to the enemy.

Presenters
Professor Roberto Gutierrez Varea, USF Faculty, Performing Arts; Human Rights Committee; Theater without Borders; freeDimensional

Additional Information
brandeis.edu/ethics/peacebuildingarts/actingtogether/
theatrewithoutborders.com
freedimensional.org

1:15-2:45pm
Real Talk: How to Speak from the Heart and Not Write Propaganda

Workshop Description
Learn how modern media really works from two people who've seen it from the inside. We'll air our dirty laundry and help you not sell out.

Presenters
Anna Zeman, Social Media Manager, Say Media, USF BA '10, Abraham’s Vision VP ’10-‘11
Jon Mitchell, Founder & EIC, Daily Portal

1:15-2:45pm
Creating Social and Environmental Justice through a Sustainable Campus

Workshop Description
What would a sustainable campus look like? Is it enough to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? Or should a sustainable campus also address social inequalities like differential pay for male and female employees? What types of campus organizations would be needed to work toward sustainability rooted in social and environmental justice? Participate in this workshop to explore these questions and hear the proposals for campus sustainability organizing from students in Professor Kuperus' "Environmental Justice" class.

Presenters
Students from Professor Gerard Kuperus' Environmental Justice class

1:15-2:45pm
Combating Environmental Racism: Indigenous Struggles Over Oil Extraction, Water, and Tourism

Workshop Description
In this panel, Dr. Mattie Harper (UCSC) and Professor Christopher Loperena (USF) will discuss the ways in which indigenous peoples are organizing to combat the catastrophic effects of extractive industries on their territories. The panel will address the transnational dimensions of indigenous social movements, from the Idle No More Movement in North America to the struggles of indigenous peoples in Honduras.

Presenters
Professor Chris Loperena, USF Faculty, MAIS and BAIS
Dr. Mattie Harper, UCSC Postdoctoral Fellow, Anthropology

1:15-2:45pm
Dialogue, Deliberation, and Discourse: Is Talking Activism or Normalization?

Workshop Description
Conflicts are all around us, between roommates and between nations. Generally, we solve conflicts in two seemingly distinct ways: action and discussion. Some argue, however, that discussion actually is a form of action—we are actively doing something when we talk. Others disagree, citing discussion to be solely the precursor or postcursor to action. Still others demand that discussion can actually hinder action, normalizing unequal relations as legitimate. This workshop will address these debates head-on by creating a collective space for us to challenge one another, personally reflect, and come to our own conclusions on how we might value transforming the conflicts we are most deeply passionate about.

Presenters
Roi Bachmutsky, Abraham’s Vision VP ’11-‘12
Rachel Nilson, Abraham's Vision VP '11-'12
Nadya Tanous, Abraham's Vision VP '11-'12
TBD

3-4:30pm
Going Beyond Israel and Palestine: Identities and International Conflict -- Toward Transformation          

Presenters
Professor Huda Abu Arqoub, USF Faculty, Center for Global Education; Abraham's Vision; Center for Transformative Education

3-4:30pm
Better with the Lights on

Workshop Description
This is an interactive and educational workshop surrounding the issue of sexual education (or lack thereof) in the Middle East. Today, sexual taboos are what oppress and affect the majority of demographic trends in the region, specifically in regard to STDs, pregnancy/birth rates, rape culture, legislation surrounding the issue, and more

Presenters
Tala Dayyat, USF BA ‘14
Nureen Khadr, USF, BA ‘16

Additional Information
This workshop will be built around an activity similar to the game "Taboo", not only keeping participants engaged but also to illustrate how lack of communication on the issues of sex and sexuality are a major factor in curbing growth in the region.

3-4:30pm
Urban Gardens and Social Justice: A USF/NoPa Urban Garden Tour

Workshop Description
Students involved in USF's campus garden and Environmental Studies seniors working on the New Liberation Garden Project will offer a tour of these two gardens. Prepare to engage in some light garden work while discussing the potential of urban gardens, and urban agriculture more broadly, to address social justice challenges of food production, urban planning, education, community engagement, and other issues.

Presenters
Environmental Studies seniors in Capstone Seminar in Environmental Studies (ENVA 450)