Faculty

Tel:(415) 422-6349
eliasr@usfca.edu

Robert Elias

Professor

Robert Elias has taught in the Politics Department at USF since 1989. He founded the USF Legal Studies and the Peace & Justice Studies programs. He coordinates the Legal Studies, Criminal Justice Studies, and the 4+3 Law programs, teaches in the Honors Humanities and BA/MA in International Studies programs, and is the Editor of Peace Review: An International Journal of Social Justice.

Tel:(415) 422-4132
lgascon2@usfca.edu

Danny Gascón

Assistant Professor

Danny Gascón received his MA and BA in Criminal Justice at California State University, San Bernardino, and earned his Ph.D. in Criminology, Law & Society at the University of California, Irvine. His research interests lie at the intersection of urban criminology, law and society, and race and ethnic relations, and is principally concerned with critical approaches to the study of urban policing, punishment and inequality, and gang and youth culture. Danny currently teaches Criminology, Juvenile Justice, Policing, and the Sociology of Law. 

Tel:(415) 422-4379
kdmcbride@usfca.edu

Keally McBride

Associate Professor

Dr. Keally McBride received her graduate degrees at University of California at Berkeley with a focus in political theory. She has published two books, Collective Dreams: Political Imagination and Community, and Punishment and Political Order. Her current research is on political theories of decolonization; investigating how ideas of liberation can change our views on global politics and also our understanding of power and social change.

Tel:(415) 422-5116
paris@usfca.edu

Jeffrey Paris

Associate Professor

Jeffrey Paris joined the USF faculty in 2001, and has taught over twenty different courses in topics ranging from Existential and Postmodern Philosophy to Imprisonment to Science Fiction.

Tel:(415) 422-5414
kdrichman@usfca.edu

Kimberly Richman

Associate Professor

Kimberly Richman received her Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include law and society, crime and deviance, family law, gender and sexuality, and reintegrative programming for prison inmates. She is the author of the book Courting Change (NYU Press) and multiple articles and book chapters. She is also President of the non-profit Alliance for C.H.A.N.G.E.

Tel:(415) 422-5624
santos@usfca.edu

Cecília Santos

Associate Professor

Cecília MacDowell Santos received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. She teaches courses on gender and development, globalization, sociology of law, and Brazilian culture and society. Her research focuses on legal mobilization within and across national borders, violence, memory, and women's and human rights. She is interested in investigating how legal mobilization relates to politics and shapes the recognition of violence and subjects of rights on the basis of gender, race, class, and/or sexual orientation. This was examined in her book, Women's Police Stations: Gender, Violence, and Justice in São Paulo, and guides her current projects on transnational legal mobilization and human rights in Brazil and in Portugal.

Tel:415-422-5063
taylorj@usfca.edu

James Taylor

Chair, Professor

James Lance Taylor received his graduate degrees at the University of Southern California (USC). His teaching and research scholarly interests are in religion and politics in the United States, race and ethnic politics, African American political history, social movements, political ideology, law and public policy, and the U.S. Presidency. He is author of the book Black Nationalism in the United States: From Malcolm X to Barack Obama.

Tel:415-422-6861
weinerb@usfca.edu

Brian Weiner

Associate Professor

Brian Weiner received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. He specializes in political theory (from the ancients to contemporary theory), American political theory, and public law. Weiner was the recipient of the 2003-2004 University Distinguished Teaching Award. His book, Sins of the Parents: The Politics of National Apologies in the United States, was published by Temple University Press in 2005. The book examines the political and legal issues raised by recent attempts by the U.S. government to redress past wrongs.