Faculty

Tel:

Tel:422-4135
lagifford@usfca.edu

Lindsay Gifford

Assistant Professor

Lindsay Gifford holds a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Anthropology through UCLA. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology at Boston University in 2009. Her research focuses broadly on the public sphere in the Middle East, with her current project looking into spatio-temporal patterns of violence in Baghdad since the inception of the 2003 US-led war and Iraqi refugee perceptions of and strategies toward those patterns internationally.

Tel:415-422-6902
bgoldman@usfca.edu

William Goldman

Assistant Professor

Tel:(415) 422-5412
hjhoag@usfca.edu

Heather Hoag

Associate Professor

Heather Hoag, Ph.D., Associate Professor (History, Boston University, 2003) specializes in African environmental history with an emphasis in river history, hydropower development, technology, and development planning. Her teaching interests include African history (with a specialization in the colonial period), history of South Africa, environmental history, and food history.

Tel:(415) 422-4133
bjlawless@usfca.edu

Brandi Lawless

Assistant Professor

Brandi Lawless (Ph. D., Intercultural Communication, University of New Mexico) teaches Qualitative Methods, Communication and Culture, and Communication and Everyday Life. Her focus is on identity, race, and social class. Her work explores how ideologies are reproduced through everyday performances of self and how this leads to status-based hierarchies and social injustice.

Tel:(415) 422-6914
cloperena@usfca.edu

Christopher Loperena

Assistant Professor and Co-Director

Christopher Loperena is an assistant professor of International Studies. He received his Ph.D. in the African Diaspora Program in Social Anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin, where he also earned an M.A. in Latin American Studies. His teaching and research interests include black and indigenous social movements in Latin America, race and gender, citizenship, environment and development, and anthropological research methods. Specifically, Dr. Loperena's scholarship examines Garifuna struggles over land and cultural resources against the backdrop of neoliberal tourism development on the Caribbean coast of Honduras. He has collaborated on numerous studies with the Organización Fraternal Negra Hondureña (OFRANEH) and the Caribbean and Central America Research Council (CCARC). He was the Cesar Chávez Fellow in Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies (2011-12) at Dartmouth College before assuming his position at the University of San Francisco. Dr. Loperena has also received fellowships and research support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Inter-American Foundation. He is currently preparing a book manuscript based on his dissertation field research.   Chris also serves as the Co-Director of the Master of Arts in International Studies (MAIS) Program.

Tel:(415) 422-5895
macdonaldt@usfca.edu

Thomas MacDonald

Associate Professor

Tom MacDonald received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. Dr. MacDonald's research focuses on designing computer simulations of problems of pollution migration and using the results to engineer systems to contain pollutants and prevent further spreading. He has also published his research on the neural network application for bioremediation. Recently he has co-authored papers dealing with environmental risk and the precautionary principle.

Tel:(415) 422-4379
kdmcbride@usfca.edu

Keally McBride

Professor

Dr. Keally McBride received her graduate degrees at University of California at Berkeley with a focus in political theory. She has published two books, Collective Dreams: Political Imagination and Community, and Punishment and Political Order. Her current research is on political theories of decolonization; investigating how ideas of liberation can change our views on global politics and also our understanding of power and social change.

Tel:(415) 422-6080
roddys@usfca.edu

Stephen Roddy

Professor

Associate Professor of Modern and Classical Languages, received his Ph.D. in East Asian Studies from Princeton University, and specializes in the fiction and other prose genres of 18th and 19th century China and Japan.

Tel:(415) 422-5624
santos@usfca.edu

Cecília Santos

Associate Professor

Cecília MacDowell Santos received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. She teaches courses on gender and development, globalization, sociology of law, and Brazilian culture and society. Her research focuses on legal mobilization within and across national borders, violence, memory, and women's and human rights. She is interested in investigating how legal mobilization relates to politics and shapes the recognition of violence and subjects of rights on the basis of gender, race, class, and/or sexual orientation. This was examined in her book, Women's Police Stations: Gender, Violence, and Justice in São Paulo, and guides her current projects on transnational legal mobilization and human rights in Brazil and in Portugal.

Tel:415-422-4498

Yaniv Stopnitzky

Assistant Professor

Dr. Yaniv Stopnitzky received his Ph.D. from Yale University. His areas of specialization include environmental and development economics, with a focus on applied microeconometrics.

Tel:(415) 422-5058
awibben@usfca.edu

Annick Wibben

Associate Professor

Annick T.R. Wibben received her Ph.D. in International Politics from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, UK and teaches for the Politics Department and the International Studies program at USF.In her research, she specializes in (critical) security studies, international theory, and feminist international relations. Her book, Feminist Security Studies: A Narrative Approach, was published in 2011 and her edited book Researching War: Feminist Methods, Ethics & Politics is forthcoming with Routledge later this year. See also her academia.edu profile for updated information. Note: Prof. Wibben is on sabbatical until August 2016.

Tel:(415) 422-5863
wydick@usfca.edu

Bruce Wydick

Professor

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. Areas of specialization: Use of econometric, experimental, and game-theoretic tools to analyze the impact of development projects and policies, especially in the areas of microfinance, education, and health.  Recent work examines the impact of microfinance, child sponsorship, and animal donation programs.

Tel:(415) 422-4377
trzaman@usfca.edu

Taymiya Zaman

Associate Professor

Taymiya R. Zaman received her B.A. (2001) in Philosophy from Smith College and her Ph.D. in History (2007) from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She joined the University of San Francisco in 2007. Her area of research expertise is Mughal India and her current research interests include historical memory in South Asia, the interconnectedness of life writing and history, and the transition from subjects to citizens in the Islamicate world. She has designed the History Department's "Islamic World" emphasis and teaches courses on the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires and the making of modern South Asia and the Middle East. She also writes narrative non-fiction and fiction.   

Tel:415-422-4734
jzarobell@usfca.edu

John Zarobell

Assistant Professor

John Zarobell is Assistant Professor of International Studies and Program Chair of European Studies at the University of San Francisco. Formerly, he held the positions of assistant curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and associate curator at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Tel:(415) 422-6193
dzartner@usfca.edu

Dana Zartner

Associate Professor and Chair, International Studies Department; Adjunct Professor, USF School of Law

Dana Zartner is an Associate Professor and Chair of  the International Studies Department, as well as an Adjunct Professor at USF’s School of Law. Professor Zartner specializes in international and comparative law, and her research specifically looks at the role of legal culture and different legal traditions in shaping legal processes, as well as the relationship between domestic and international law in the areas of human rights and the environment. Her book Courts, Codes, and Custom: Legal Tradition and State Policy Toward International Human Rights and Environmental Law was published by Oxford University Press (2014). 

Tel:(415) 422-6981
zunes@usfca.edu

Stephen Zunes

Professor

Stephen Zunes received his PhD. from Cornell University, his M.A. from Temple University, and his B.A. from Oberlin College. His teaching and research interests include U.S. foreign policy, Middle Eastern politics, strategic nonviolent action, international conflict, and globalization. He offers courses for the Politics department,  the B.A. and M.A. programs in International Studies, the Peace & Justice Studies program, and the Middle Eastern Studies program, for which he serves as program director.